Sports

7:51am

Sun September 15, 2013
NPR Story

The Olympics Has A Big Problem

Originally published on Wed September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Time now for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF THEME MUSIC)

MARTIN: NPR's Mike Pesca was in Buenos Aires last week for the International Olympic Committee's big announcement of who will host the 2020 Olympics. It's Tokyo, by the way. While he was there, it really set in for him that the Olympics has a problem. He thinks he knows a way to fix it. He joins us now. Hey, Mike.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: I just talked to smart, informed people. I didn't really come up with it...

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5:47pm

Sat September 14, 2013
Sports

For Rich NFL Players, Do Fines Matter?

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 6:15 pm

The NFL has fined Detroit Lions defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh $100,000 for an illegal low block behind an opponent's knee. Suh, twice voted the league's "dirtiest player" by fellow players in a Sporting News poll, is appealing the fine, the largest ever for on-the-field conduct. The question for Suh and fellow athletes is whether fines change behavior.

7:47am

Sat September 14, 2013
Sports

Nine American League Teams In Playoff Running

Originally published on Sat September 14, 2013 11:28 am

Which team looks poised for the best last-minute kick? NPR's Scott Simon talks to Howard Bryant of ESPN about the scramble for a spot in the baseball's American League playoffs.

11:09am

Fri September 13, 2013
NPR Story

Oklahoma State Slammed By Sports Illustrated

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now it's time for our weekly visit to the barbershop where the guys talk about what's in the news and what's on their minds. Sitting in the chairs for a shape-up this week are writer Jimi Izrael, with us from Cleveland. Here in our Washington, D.C. studios, sports writer and journalism professor Kevin Blackistone, Corey Dade, contributing editor for The Root, and NPR editor Ammad Omar decided to stick around. What do you know?

AMMAD OMAR, BYLINE: Hey, why not?

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11:09am

Fri September 13, 2013
NPR Story

Is The NFL Weakening Defense Of Redskins' Name?

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 2:30 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for Backtalk, that's where we hear from you. Editor Ammad Omar is back with us once again. What's going on today, Ammad?

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10:58am

Fri September 13, 2013
Code Switch

'Money' And 'Canelo' Punch It Out For Black And Latino Fans

Originally published on Fri September 13, 2013 5:51 pm

Floyd Mayweather and Saul "Canelo" Alvarez are at the center of one of the biggest sports events of the year, but you wouldn't know it by looking at mainstream sports media.
Anna John Stiff Jab

Ex-jock talking heads aside, the nation's sports pages remain overwhelmingly white. That's probably why you're only vaguely aware that for many of us, tomorrow night is the one of the biggest sporting events of the year.

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2:30pm

Thu September 12, 2013
Sports

Pioneer Billie Jean King Moved The Baseline For Women's Tennis

Originally published on Thu September 12, 2013 5:03 pm

Billie Jean King, seen here in 1977, learned to play tennis on the public courts near her Long Beach, Calif., home.
Kathy Willens AP/Press Association Images

Women's tennis champion Billie Jean King is best remembered for her 1973 exhibition match, known as "The Battle of the Sexes," with self-proclaimed male chauvinist Bobby Riggs. But King also had a remarkable career, both as a tennis player and as a trailblazer for women: She won a record 20 Wimbledon titles, six of them for singles, and she led an uprising of underpaid female players to demand fairer treatment and compensation in professional tennis.

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1:36pm

Wed September 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Oklahoma State Promises Own Probe Of Alleged Football Abuses

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 4:05 pm

Oklahoma State players celebrate after a score during an Aug. 31 game against Mississippi State.
Bob Levey Getty Images

On this third day of Sports Illustrated's five-part series that exposes what the magazine says are sweeping problems in Oklahoma State University's football program — including money being paid to players, tutors doing players' schoolwork and women from a "hostess program" having sex with recruits — the school's president is vowing to investigate it thoroughly.

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3:25am

Wed September 11, 2013
Sweetness And Light

Diana Nyad's Accomplishment Makes America's Cup Look All Wet

Originally published on Wed September 11, 2013 7:54 am

Long-distance swimmer Diana Nyad swims toward shore in Key West, Fla., on Sept. 2, the first person to swim from Cuba to Florida without the help of a shark cage. She arrived at the beach about 53 hours after beginning her swim in Havana.
J Pat Carter AP

For sportswriters the fattest target has always been the America's Cup. It's too easy. It's like all those political writers who make fun of vice presidents and think they're being original. Sportswriters have been going har-de-har-har about the America's Cup even long before one of their wags said it was like watching paint dry. Or like watching grass grow. One or the other. Maybe both.

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6:05pm

Tue September 10, 2013
Sports

NASCAR Nastiness Results In Sport's Biggest Fine Ever

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Finally this hour, NASCAR nastiness. This past Saturday, one team appeared to pull out all the stops to rig a big race. One driver spun out his car, and another took an unnecessary pit stop. Both moves helped advance their teammate to the playoffs. NASCAR fined their team - Michael Waltrip Racing - $300,000, and suspended their general manager indefinitely.

Now, this is the biggest fine in NASCAR history, according to Nate Ryan. He's a senior motorsports reporter for USA Today Sports. He joins us from Charlotte, N.C. Hey there, Nate.

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