WVAS Local News

Alabama State University's annual Fall Career Fair hosted hundreds of people Thursday.  Organizers say more than 100 representatives were on hand offering information about full-time, part-time, co-op and internship positions. The annual career fair was held at ASU's Dunn-Oliver Acadome.  

 The Alabama House Judiciary Committee is meeting to discuss the ongoing impeachment investigation of Gov. Robert Bentley. The committee on Tuesday afternoon is to hear an update from special counsel Jack Sharman and discuss his proposed changes to the committee's rules of procedure. Committee members will vote on a number of proposed changes. One specifies that the governor's attorneys would not have the right to cross-examine any witnesses who testify before the committee.

The Alabama State University family is mourning the death of one of its students, 18-year-old Jerrett Mumford. In an official statement the university offers its prayers and condolences to the family of Mumford.  Officials say Mumford was killed on Sunday in a car accident in Georgia.  ASU President, Dr. Gwendolyn Boyd says “we extend our deepest sympathy to his family, friends and colleagues.  A student-led memorial service will be held Tuesday at 11 a.m. at Card Residence Hall, where Mumford resided on campus.  

Montgomery Police Investigate Weekend Homicide

Sep 26, 2016

   Montgomery Police have begun a homicide investigation into the death of a 19 year old male.  A department release states that around 11pm Saturday police and fire medics were called to the 600 block of Clinton Street on a report of a subject shot. The victim, Zhivago Hines of Montgomery, was located and taken to a local hospital where he later died. The circumstances surrounding the shooting are still being determined. Police say no arrests have been made.

Tuskegee Mayor Johnny Ford held a press conference Friday urging the citizens of Macon County to stand-up for their voting rights in wake of a possible shut-down.  Ford's press conference was held in response to the governor and state attorney general asking law enforcement officials to shut down the newly reopened electronic gambling operations including VictoryLand.  VictoryLand reopened on Sept. 13th.  The casino had been shut since 2013 when the state seized the casino's gambling machines.  

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During the presidential debate on Monday night, Hillary Clinton raised a 1973 federal lawsuit brought against Donald Trump and his company for alleged racial discrimination at Trump housing developments in New York.

One week after a House panel highlighted sexual harassment claims at Yosemite National Park and elsewhere in the National Park Service, the superintendent of Yosemite, Don Neubacher is stepping down, the agency says.

According to NPS regional spokesman Andrew Munoz, the agency "acted to move Don Neubacher from his role" leading the park to protect the integrity of its investigation into allegations of a hostile work environment at Yosemite.

A new study highlights differences between the races as they view the recent spate of deadly encounters between blacks and law enforcement.

Whether boosting or buffeting the careers of the Beatles, the Doors and the Stooges, Danny Fields was the man behind the curtain. He remains so in Danny Says, a candid yet unrevealing documentary named for a song the Ramones wrote about Fields.

The angry old gent at the heart of the Swedish film A Man Called Ove is the kind of man who puts on a suit and tie every time he tries to kill himself, which believe me is more than twice. He's also the kind of man you're likely to find in films submitted to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. So even though Ove, who's played with firmly compressed lips by Rolf Lassgard, is a royal pain in the butt, the suicides are played for gentle laughs and it's pretty clear from the get-go that things will pan out, in their deadpan Scandinavian way.

When it was announced that Oliver Stone would be making a film about Sept. 11, the news alone felt like a startling provocation: Hollywood's most political director, a man known for upending assumptions about America's history and institutions, would be commenting on the formative tragedy of the early 21st century. Perhaps Stone would indulge in the type of leftist conspiracy theory that informed his JFK or, at a minimum, seize the opportunity to critique the drastic changes in domestic and foreign policy precipitated by the attacks.

When did our expectations for Tim Burton movies sink so precipitously? We ought to be able to forgive the guy who made Ed Wood and Sleepy Hollow a Planet of the Apes now and then. Or even an Alice in Wonderland, so long as he keeps balancing mega-grossing mediocrities like that with heartfelt stuff like Frankenweenie, his delightful stop-motion ode to his dog. Any director who averages a studio feature every other year for three decades will have a stinker or two on his resume.

It's been nearly eight months since Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died unexpectedly, leaving the nation's highest court short-handed, and evenly divided on some of the most important legal issues of the day.

While Democrats had expected to exploit GOP stonewalling on a replacement, Republicans have played the issue shrewdly.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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