WVAS Local News

The public is invited to the annual Jewish Food Festival; it will be held in Montgomery on Sunday.  Festival goers will be able to sample an assortment of Jewish food and shop in the "Treasure Market."  Rabbi Elliot Stevens of the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or says events like the festival serve as a community outreach tool.  The free event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or.  

   The crash report involving a Montgomery Police officer has been made available to the media. WVAS News received a copy of the report from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency. The February 17 crash happened at the corner of Woodley Road and Spring Valley. An unmarked police car collided with another car, critically injuring the officer, identified as Carlos Taylor and also injuring the other driver, now identified as Mae Francis Williams of Montgomery.

Montgomery Proclaims March 2 Claudette Colvin Day

Feb 22, 2017

   Many people think of Rosa Parks as the woman who sparked the Montgomery bus boycott by refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in 1955. But 15 year old Claudette Colvin had actually done the same thing months earlier. Last night, Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange issued a proclamation declaring March 2 as Claudette Colvin Day in the city. District 3 councilman Tracy Larkin says it’s good to see the civil rights pioneer getting the recognition she deserves.

Governor to Create Grocery Tax Task Force

Feb 21, 2017

   Governor Robert Bentley has scheduled an afternoon press conference to announce the formation of a Grocery Tax Task Force. Bentley had said in his State of the State address this month that he wanted to examine removing the state sales tax from groceries. Democratic Representative John Knight of Montgomery has brought many bills over the years to accomplish that. He says Alabama should have removed the sales tax from food a long time ago. Knight was a guest on the WVAS 90.7 Perspectives program last week.

Alabama Sets Record High for Exports

Feb 20, 2017

Exports from Alabama-made products totaled nearly $20.6 billion last years, according to the governor's office. The number is a record high for exports in the state. The previous record was $19.6 billion in 2012. Alabama Department of Commerce's Office of International Trade says exports of Alabama-made transportation products include automobiles, aircraft parts, chemicals and metals. They were shipped to 189 countries last year. Commerce Department data states that Canada, China, Germany, Mexico and the United Kingdom were top markets for Alabama-made products. 

Donate Your Old Car. Support WVAS!

The mission of WVAS is to support Alabama State University’s statewide mission for outreach and public service by providing an outlet for the presentation of enrichment programs of an academic, cultur

President Trump announced Saturday afternoon that he would break from a decades-old tradition and skip the annual White House Correspondents' Association Dinner scheduled for April 29.

"I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year. Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!" Trump tweeted.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Tom Perez Elected As New DNC Chair

4 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

South Africa Xenophobic Attacks

4 hours ago

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Consider this your semi-regular reminder that, well, space is pretty neat.

If you're in the southern hemisphere and you happen to look up Sunday morning — or, for everyone else, if you happen to have Internet access — you may have the chance to see an annular solar eclipse. Unlike a total solar eclipse, this one will leave just a sliver of sunlight shining at the rim of the moon's shadow as passes between Earth and the sun.

When Lucille Horn was born in 1920, the odds of her managing to live out the year were long. A premature infant, Horn was just 2 pounds — small enough to be held in her father's hand. Her twin had died at birth, and at that point it looked for all the world as if she would soon, too.

Instead, with the help of an enterprising doctor and a rather odd sideshow at New York's Coney Island, Horn would go on to live another 96 years. She died on Feb. 11, according to Hungerford & Clark Funeral Home, nearly a century after nearly every expert told her parents she would.

Pages