WVAS Local News

Another Inmate Stabbed to Death

22 hours ago

   Another state inmate has been killed in violence at an Alabama prison. A Department of Corrections statement says 36-year-old DeMarko  Carlisle was stabbed to death during an altercation at Elmore Correctional Facility on Sunday. The agency has a suspect, but officials aren't releasing that prisoner's name. They say the motive isn't known. Carlisle was serving a life sentence after being convicted of robbery in Jefferson County in 1999. Carlisle is the second inmate killed at Elmore prison in 10 days. Grant Mickens was stabbed to death in the prison on Feb. 16.

The public is invited to the annual Jewish Food Festival; it will be held in Montgomery on Sunday.  Festival goers will be able to sample an assortment of Jewish food and shop in the "Treasure Market."  Rabbi Elliot Stevens of the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or says events like the festival serve as a community outreach tool.  The free event will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Kahl Montgomery Temple Beth Or.  

   The crash report involving a Montgomery Police officer has been made available to the media. WVAS News received a copy of the report from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency. The February 17 crash happened at the corner of Woodley Road and Spring Valley. An unmarked police car collided with another car, critically injuring the officer, identified as Carlos Taylor and also injuring the other driver, now identified as Mae Francis Williams of Montgomery.

Montgomery Proclaims March 2 Claudette Colvin Day

Feb 22, 2017

   Many people think of Rosa Parks as the woman who sparked the Montgomery bus boycott by refusing to give up her seat to a white passenger on a city bus in 1955. But 15 year old Claudette Colvin had actually done the same thing months earlier. Last night, Montgomery Mayor Todd Strange issued a proclamation declaring March 2 as Claudette Colvin Day in the city. District 3 councilman Tracy Larkin says it’s good to see the civil rights pioneer getting the recognition she deserves.

Governor to Create Grocery Tax Task Force

Feb 21, 2017

   Governor Robert Bentley has scheduled an afternoon press conference to announce the formation of a Grocery Tax Task Force. Bentley had said in his State of the State address this month that he wanted to examine removing the state sales tax from groceries. Democratic Representative John Knight of Montgomery has brought many bills over the years to accomplish that. He says Alabama should have removed the sales tax from food a long time ago. Knight was a guest on the WVAS 90.7 Perspectives program last week.

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"Flesh is a dead format," writes Mark O'Connell in To Be a Machine, his new nonfiction book about the contemporary transhumanist movement. It's an alarming statement, but don't kill the messenger: As he's eager to explain early in the book, the author is not a transhumanist himself.

In 1890, Sir Thomas Lipton arrived on the island of Ceylon, now Sri Lanka, to purchase a plot of land that would become the first tea estate in his global tea empire. These days, in the Ambadandegama Valley located just a few miles from Lipton's original estate, another experiment in tea production is unfolding.

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Tressie McMillan Cottom studies for-profit colleges as a sociologist at Virginia Commonwealth University. She's analyzed large data sets, scrutinized financial filings, interviewed students and staff. But she has also helped enroll students at two different for-profits herself.

They're not named, but known only as "Beauty College" and "Technical College," in her new book, Lower Ed.

NPR Ed has covered both the rise, and some of the travails, of this form of education. We called up Cottom to hear her thoughts. Here's an edited version of our conversation.

It will certainly feel like a State of the Union on Tuesday night: The president will make a major speech to Congress. A bit more than half the room will applaud resoundingly while a bit less than half sit on their hands in that familiar and awkward display of partisanship.

Republicans are looking to President Trump to use his address to Congress Tuesday evening to define the party's path forward on how to deliver on the long-promised pledge to repeal and replace Obamacare.

The White House has, so far, ceded the decision-making to congressional leaders who are trying to unify competing moderate and conservative lawmaker demands behind a plan that can pass with narrow majorities in both chambers.

Some large health insurance companies have suffered losses under the Affordable Care Act, leading to a few high-profile exits from the health exchanges.

President Trump and his advisers have begun putting some red meat on the bones of the president's "America First" agenda.

Trump is expected to talk more about that when he addresses a joint session of Congress on Tuesday night. As with Brexit and other nationalist movements, Trump sees his election as part of a broader rejection of globalization.

"Erasing national borders does not make people safer or more prosperous," Trump told supporters in Melbourne, Fla., this month. "It undermines democracy and trades away prosperity. We're giving it away."

In the southern French city of Toulon, 39-year-old presidential candidate Emmanuel Macron is greeted by cheering crowds as he makes his way onstage at a rally. The former investment banker, who served briefly as President Francois Hollande's economy minister, has never been elected to political office. Yet he stands a good chance of becoming the next French president.

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