WVAS Local News

Marshals Warn of Jury Duty Scam

Apr 26, 2017

   The U-S Marshals Service for the Middle District of Alabama has issued a reminder about an ongoing jury-duty phone scam. People are warned to be vigilant against scammers posing as a U-S Marshal, Deputy Marshal or other law enforcement officials. The scheme basically involves someone posing as a law enforcement representative calling people to advise that they have missed federal jury duty. The scammer then says arrest can be avoided by paying a fine immediately. At that point information is provided on how the fine can be paid.

Alabama Beginning to Dry Out Again

Apr 25, 2017

   Last fall a major drought affected much of Alabama for several months before enough rain fell to alleviate the dry conditions. Unfortunately the state seems to be on a path to parched acreage once again. According to the most recent U-S Drought Monitor, more than 93 percent of the state is considered abnormally dry. Of that percentage, almost 43 percent is classified as being in moderate drought. So far, only 2.6 percent meets the criteria for severe drought. The monitor also estimates that Alabama has received about half the rain it normally does over the last 30 days.

Crime victims are calling for personal information such as addresses and telephone numbers to be removed from Alabama's court records website. They say that information should remain private in order to keep them safe from their perpetrators. A review of Alacourt.com by The Associated Press found the full names, home addresses, telephone numbers and other information of rape victims as well as children who have been molested.

Officer-Involved Shooting in Macon County

Apr 20, 2017

An officer was involved in a shooting in Macon County yesterday. A release from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency indicates that a Macon County Sheriff’s Department official fired a weapon at a suspect on U-S Highway 80 near Tuskegee. It happened not far from the Brownsville Community. The circumstances of the shooting were not given. Authorities say the suspect was taken to Columbus Medical Center with gunshot wounds, but the extent of those injuries wasn’t disclosed. The State Bureau of Investigation is handling the case.

Anti Violence Town Hall/Block Party

90.7 Perspectives is Taking It to the Streets, AGAIN!

90.7 Perspectives and the award winning WVAS-FM news team, will hold an Anti-Violence/Town Hall Block Party on April 26 at Sidney Lanier High School

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When Chris Ategeka was a boy of 7 in Uganda, his parents died of HIV/AIDS. And his brother, not yet 5, died of malaria.

Today he's 32. He's got a degree in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley (where he was the commencement speaker for the college of engineering at his graduation in 2011). With his entrepreneurial spirit, he could have followed classmates to Silicon Valley.

But he didn't.

In his TED Fellows talk in Vancouver this week, he explained how his personal history set him on a different path.

We're always excited for the beginning of summer movie season. Despite the fact that it's almost guaranteed to contain some major disappointments and jarring disasters, we often find goofy fun, sharp writing and new stars blowing up (sometimes literally) our cinematic seasons.

Regina Carter On Piano Jazz

2 hours ago

Jazz violinist Regina Carter is one of today's most original and daring musicians. Classically trained, Carter grew up in Detroit, where she absorbed all the music that Motown had to offer. While in high school, Carter became inspired when she discovered jazz violinists such as Noel Pointer, Ray Nance and Eddie South.

The U.S. economy grew at just a 0.7 percent annual rate in the first quarter of this year, according to the latest report on the gross domestic product from the Commerce Department. That's below market expectations and indicates the economy grew at the slowest pace in three years.

Weak auto sales and lower home-heating bills dragged down consumer spending, offsetting a pickup in investment led by housing and oil drilling. Employment costs rose 0.8 percent in the first quarter.

President Trump says that while he would like to resolve the issue of North Korea's nuclear program diplomatically, it will be hard — and there is a potential for a major clash with the Asian nation, Trump said in an interview with Reuters.

"There's a chance that we could end up having a major, major conflict with North Korea, absolutely," the president told the news agency.

"We'd love to solve things diplomatically but it's very difficult," Trump said.

A female terrorism suspect is in the hospital in Britain after being shot during a police raid Thursday, and officials say they believe they've "contained the threats" posed by the woman and others. The raid came on the same day a man was arrested for carrying weapons near the U.K. Parliament.

The two developments are unrelated, Scotland Yard's senior national counterterrorism coordinator Neil Basu said in a briefing Friday morning, one day after what he called it "an extraordinary day in London." Police had stopped an active terrorism plot, he told reporters.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

"Marcus Gavius Apicius purchased me on a day hot enough to fry sausage on the market stones."

So begins the tale of Thrasius, the fictional narrator of Feast of Sorrow. Released this week, the novel is based on the real life of ancient Roman noble Marcus Gavius Apicius, who is thought to have inspired and contributed to the world's oldest surviving cookbook, a ten-volume collection titled Apicius.

What makes a high-quality learning program effective not just for the child but the whole family? What else, besides a well-run pre-K, is essential to help families break out of intergenerational poverty?

An article in The New York Times last month highlighted the concern of museum curators and event planners over finding ways to make works of art accessible to the viewing public.

The director of Harvard's Peabody Museum has turned to brain science for clues to the way art manages — or, as is often the case, fails to manage — to ignite the imagination and pleasure centers of the viewing public.

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