WVAS Local News

Marshals Warn of Jury Duty Scam

10 hours ago

   The U-S Marshals Service for the Middle District of Alabama has issued a reminder about an ongoing jury-duty phone scam. People are warned to be vigilant against scammers posing as a U-S Marshal, Deputy Marshal or other law enforcement officials. The scheme basically involves someone posing as a law enforcement representative calling people to advise that they have missed federal jury duty. The scammer then says arrest can be avoided by paying a fine immediately. At that point information is provided on how the fine can be paid.

Alabama Beginning to Dry Out Again

Apr 25, 2017

   Last fall a major drought affected much of Alabama for several months before enough rain fell to alleviate the dry conditions. Unfortunately the state seems to be on a path to parched acreage once again. According to the most recent U-S Drought Monitor, more than 93 percent of the state is considered abnormally dry. Of that percentage, almost 43 percent is classified as being in moderate drought. So far, only 2.6 percent meets the criteria for severe drought. The monitor also estimates that Alabama has received about half the rain it normally does over the last 30 days.

Crime victims are calling for personal information such as addresses and telephone numbers to be removed from Alabama's court records website. They say that information should remain private in order to keep them safe from their perpetrators. A review of Alacourt.com by The Associated Press found the full names, home addresses, telephone numbers and other information of rape victims as well as children who have been molested.

Officer-Involved Shooting in Macon County

Apr 20, 2017

An officer was involved in a shooting in Macon County yesterday. A release from the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency indicates that a Macon County Sheriff’s Department official fired a weapon at a suspect on U-S Highway 80 near Tuskegee. It happened not far from the Brownsville Community. The circumstances of the shooting were not given. Authorities say the suspect was taken to Columbus Medical Center with gunshot wounds, but the extent of those injuries wasn’t disclosed. The State Bureau of Investigation is handling the case.

 Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore lost his effort to regain his job today as the Alabama Supreme Court upheld his suspension for urging defiance of the federal courts' landmark rulings allowing gays and lesbians to marry. Moore's fate was in the hands of specially appointed judges who were selected at random after his colleagues on the state's highest court recused themselves, and these judges upheld both the findings that Moore violated judicial ethics with his actions and his suspension for the remainder of his term.

Anti Violence Town Hall/Block Party

90.7 Perspectives is Taking It to the Streets, AGAIN!

90.7 Perspectives and the award winning WVAS-FM news team, will hold an Anti-Violence/Town Hall Block Party on April 26 at Sidney Lanier High School

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In 1838, Jesuit priests sold a group of 272 men, women, and children - slaves - to pay off Georgetown University's debts. The slaves were sent from Maryland to Louisiana. In part one of this two part episode, we told the story of how the residents of a small town discovered where they'd come from. Now in part two, we ask what, if anything, Georgetown owes the descendants of those slaves.

President Trump has been tweeting about a federal court ruling that temporarily blocked his plan to suspend funding for "sanctuary cities."

These are cities — among them New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago and San Francisco — that have limited their cooperation with federal immigration authorities. For example, they may refuse to detain people who are in the U.S. illegally on behalf of the federal agents.

Now, the Trump tweets:

With just two days left to stop a partial shutdown of the federal government, the Trump administration on Wednesday removed another major sticking point in the spending bill negotiations.

The White House told lawmakers it will not cut off federal subsidies that help low-income Americans pay for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, at least for now, an administration official and congressional sources confirm to NPR.

Democrats sought to have the federal payment — known as a cost-sharing reduction, or CSR — included in the spending package.

It has been just under a month since dissatisfaction with Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro erupted into massive protests — but if Wednesday's street skirmishes in Caracas are any indication, the unrest is unlikely to end soon.

Nearly 30 people have been killed in the demonstration since the end of March, when the pro-Maduro Supreme Court tried to nullify an opposition-dominated legislature — but then quickly backpedaled.

The Handmaid's Tale by Margaret Atwood is one of a handful of dystopian novels that have seen a boost in sales since the 2016 election. The book tells the story of what happens when a theocratic dictatorship takes over the government and gets rid of women's rights.

Back in the 1960s, a woman doctor in Japan created a powerful drug to help mothers who hemorrhage after childbirth.

The medicine is inexpensive to make. Safe to use. And stops bleeding quickly by helping keep naturally forming blood clots intact.

The drug's inventor, Utako Okamoto, hoped the drug called tranexamic acid would be used to help save moms' lives.

Every year about 100,000 women around the world die of blood loss soon after a baby is born. It's the biggest cause of maternal death worldwide.

Every other weekend, I pack a suitcase: a sketchbook, laptop, homework, clothes and my navy blue U.S. passport. That's my ticket to see my dad, who has been living alone in Tijuana, Mexico, for the past six years.

Apá, as I call him, was deported when I was 11 years old and my family's life has never been the same. Separation defines our routine — the stress, the traffic, the hellos and the goodbyes.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Take a good, long look at his come-hither eyes. That craggy snout. Those horns that whisper such subtle dignity. Before you swoon, just answer us this one question: Wouldn't you swipe right?

The Ol Pejeta Conservancy certainly hopes so. That's why the wildlife conservancy in Kenya has done something a little unusual for the rhino called Sudan: They've posted his dating profile on Tinder.

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