Science

5:36am

Fri July 17, 2015
Space

On The Cold, Dead Fringes Of The Solar System, Pluto Looks Shockingly Lively

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 12:36 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:38pm

Thu July 16, 2015
Children's Health

Nice Kids Finish First: Study Finds Social Skills Can Predict Future Success

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 12:41 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:26pm

Thu July 16, 2015
Goats and Soda

How Air Pollution May Have Caused Catastrophic Flooding In China

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 6:45 am

On July 9, 2013, heavy floodwaters swept through Beichuan in southwest China's Sichuan province.
AFP/Getty Images

Air pollution isn't just bad for your health. It can have dramatic effects on weather and climate. In fact, a team of scientists believes that air pollution from industries and traffic could have caused the extreme floods that devastated southwest China in 2013.

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12:34pm

Thu July 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

Screaming For Science: The Secrets Of Crying Babies And Car Alarms

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 5:08 pm

It's almost impossible to ignore a screaming baby. (Click here if you doubt that.) And now scientists think they know why.

"Screams occupy their own little patch of the soundscape that doesn't seem to be used for other things," says David Poeppel, a professor of psychology and neuroscience at New York University and director of the Department of Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute in Frankfurt.

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12:27pm

Thu July 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

Webcast: Sports And Health In America

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 3:05 pm

Pamela Moore/iStockphoto/Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health

The vast majority of kids in America play sports.

But while about three-quarters of adults played sports when they were younger, only 1 in 4 still plays sports today. Among them, men are more than twice as likely as women to play.

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10:24am

Thu July 16, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Powered By Plants On The Ultramarathon Trail

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 2:46 pm

Ultramarathoner Scott Jurek.
Ted S. Warren AP

The Appalachian Trail (AT) runs from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mount Katahdin in Maine, crossing 14 states for a total of 2,189 miles. This past Sunday, ultramarathon runner Scott Jurek completed a thru-hike of the AT in record-breaking time: 46 days, 8 hours and 7 minutes.

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5:02am

Thu July 16, 2015
The Two-Way

'Buckyballs' Solve Century-Old Mystery About Interstellar Space

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 11:03 am

Harry Kroto, pictured in 1996, displays a model of the geodesic-shaped carbon molecules that he helped discover.
Michael Scates AP

Researchers in Switzerland say they've solved a nearly 100-year-old astronomical mystery by discovering what's in the wispy cloud of gas that floats in the space between the stars.

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5:02am

Thu July 16, 2015
Shots - Health News

Why We Play Sports: Winning Motivates, But Can Backfire, Too

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 5:08 pm

Lorenzo Gritti for NPR

Playing sports has always been important to 31-year-old Erik Johanson, a city planner in Philadelphia. Johanson thrived in baseball and ice hockey as a kid, he says — "one of the best players on the team in high school."

Today, Johanson is married and expecting his first child but is still passionate about ice hockey — and about winning. He plays on a highly competitive team of guys who got together after college and still play weekly in an adult league; they hope to take the crown this year.

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3:42pm

Wed July 15, 2015
The Two-Way

Strange Worlds At The Edge Of Our Solar System Finally Come Into Focus

New details of Pluto's largest moon, Charon, are revealed in this image from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager.
NASA

Scientists have unveiled the best photos of Pluto and its moons that humanity is likely to see for at least a generation. These images were taken Tuesday by NASA's New Horizons space probe as it hurtled past Pluto at more than 30,000 miles per hour.

Since its discovery in 1930, Pluto has revealed itself to be an oddball world. It's smaller than our own moon, and it orbits at an angle relative to the plane of the solar system. Because of its size and distance, even the Hubble Space Telescope could only make it out as a brown smudge, billions of miles away.

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2:40pm

Wed July 15, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Pluto Encounter Is A Legacy Of Our Generation

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 3:17 pm

NASA/JHUAPL/SWRI

It finally happened. On Tuesday, the space probe New Horizons passed by a mere 7,800 miles from Pluto, the closest encounter ever with a world that is, on average, 3.7 billion miles from Earth.

It took nine years for the very fast probe to get there, something that our 13.7 blogger Adam Frank estimated would take some 6,923 years by car "give or take a few decades."

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