Science

2:18pm

Fri August 7, 2015
Shots - Health News

Eye Shapes Of The Animal World Hint At Differences In Our Lifestyles

Originally published on Wed August 12, 2015 1:52 pm

Can you guess which eyes belong to what animal? Top row, from left: cuttlefish, lion, goat. Bottom row, from left: domestic cat, horse, gecko.
Top row: iStockphoto; bottom row: Flickr

Take a close look at a house cat's eyes and you'll see pupils that look like vertical slits. But a tiger has round pupils — like humans do. And the eyes of other animals, like goats and horses, have slits that are horizontal.

Scientists have now done the first comprehensive study of these three kinds of pupils. The shape of the animal's pupil, it turns out, is closely related to the animal's size and whether it's a predator or prey.

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1:37pm

Fri August 7, 2015
Shots - Health News

Men Looking To Get Ripped Are At Risk Of Abusing Legal Supplements

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 3:38 pm

Turning to over-the-counter supplements to get ripped can contribute to physical and psychological issues.
iStockphoto

Men who work out may be using legal over-the-counter supplements to the point that it's harming their emotional or physiological health, according to a recent study.

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1:02pm

Fri August 7, 2015
The Two-Way

#NPRreads: Cecil's Zimbabwe And UCLA Tracks A Superbug

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 6:06 pm

#NPRreads is a weekly feature on Twitter and on The Two-Way. The premise is simple: Correspondents, editors and producers throughout our newsroom share pieces that have kept them reading. They share tidbits using the #NPRreads hashtag — and on Fridays, we highlight some of the best stories.

This week, we bring you three items.

From NPR's South America correspondent, Lourdes Garcia-Navarro:

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11:22am

Fri August 7, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

A New Way To Look At Emotions

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 3:22 pm

iStockphoto

When I was a kid, I noticed that sometimes fear and anticipation felt the same way.

I'd get butterflies, a kind of queasiness in the stomach. To figure out what I was feeling, I came to realize, what was needed was not introspection, but attention to the context.

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10:47am

Fri August 7, 2015
The Salt

Disgust Diet: Can You Train Your Brain To Recoil At High-Calorie Foods?

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 3:04 pm

Sure, seeing a cockroach on your fries would turn you off eating them. But what about seeing a photo of a cockroach flash by before you see a photo of fries?
Flickr

Some days, the french fries are just irresistible. You know it's not the best thing to put in your body, but did that salad really stand a chance after the smell of fried garlic, Parmesan and thyme on crisp potato wedges wafted over to you?

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10:03pm

Thu August 6, 2015
Goats and Soda

Can You Protect Your Tummy From Traveler's Diarrhea?

Originally published on Fri August 7, 2015 4:33 pm

Leif Parsons for NPR

It goes by many names: Delhi belly. Montezuma's revenge. The Aztec two-step. But doctors use one not-so-glamorous term: traveler's diarrhea.

If you're visiting a place this summer with less than ideal sewage disposal — maybe a resort in Mexico or a village in Rajasthan — chances are your GI tract will give you trouble at least once ... maybe twice ... maybe continuously.

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1:45pm

Thu August 6, 2015
The Salt

Cut Your Bagel The Mathematically Correct Way

Originally published on Mon August 10, 2015 5:57 pm

Courtesy of Amy Pearl

When I interviewed mathematician Eugenia Cheng for an upcoming episode of The Sporkful podcast, she sliced a bagel along a Mobius strip.

A Mobius strip, in case you're not familiar, is a surface with only one side. You can make one by taking a strip of paper, twisting one end halfway around, and taping it to the other end. Like this:

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5:00am

Thu August 6, 2015
Science

It Took A Musician's Ear To Decode The Complex Song In Whale Calls

Originally published on Wed August 19, 2015 4:25 pm

Humpback whales don't just sing songs — they compose with the whales around them, singing a song that evolves over time. Scientists didn't know that until they started recording whale sounds in the 1960s and spent years listening. The evolution of this "culture of listening" among researchers is the focus of Morning Edition's weekly summer series, Close Listening: Decoding Nature Through Sound.

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4:22am

Thu August 6, 2015
Science

Why Did The U.S. Choose Hiroshima?

Originally published on Thu August 6, 2015 9:45 am

U.S. strategists wanted to flatten an entire city with a single atomic bomb: Hiroshima was the right size.
AP

The name Hiroshima is so tied to the atomic bomb that it's hard to imagine there were other possible targets.

But in early 1945, the U.S. was still months away from building its first bomb and certainly didn't know what to hit.

"Should it be a city? Should it be a military installation? Should you be just displaying the bomb, without killing anybody?" These are questions that were yet to be decided, says Alex Wellerstein, a historian at the Stevens Institute of Technology.

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12:20am

Thu August 6, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Are Whales And Dolphins Cultural Beings?

Originally published on Thu August 6, 2015 6:36 pm

Two sperm whales, members of a social unit named "The Group of Seven," begin a dive together in the deep waters close to Dominica, West Indies.
Courtesy of Luke Rendell/Whitehead Lab Dominica Sperm Whale Project

The idea that our oceans teem with cultural animals — and have for millions of years — is the central conclusion of a new book by two whale scientists. And it's a convincing one.

Whales and dolphins, as they forage for food and interact with each other in their social units, may learn specific ways of doing things from their mothers or their pod mates.

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