Science

6:07pm

Tue March 18, 2014
The Two-Way

Study: The Chicken Didn't Cross The Pacific To South America

A Filipino chicken vendor in Quezon City, east of Manila, Philippines. Researchers say Pacific island chicken are genetically similar to the variety found in the Philippines, but different from South American chicken.
Rolex Dela Pena EPA/Landov

An analysis of DNA from chicken bones collected in the South Pacific appears to dispel a long-held theory that the ubiquitous bird first arrived in South America aboard an ancient Polynesian seafarer's ocean-going outrigger.

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4:43pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

An Imaginary Town Becomes Real, Then Not. True Story

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 5:38 pm

Booklist American Library Association

This is the story of a totally made-up place that suddenly became real — and then, strangely, undid itself and became a fantasy again. Imagine Pinocchio becoming a real boy and then going back to being a puppet. That's what happened here — but this is a true story.

It's about a place in upstate New York called Agloe. You can see it here, circled in blue ...

... just up the road from Roscoe and Rockland.

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4:25pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Animals

Giant Lizards Rise In Fla. — And They've Got Quite An Appetite

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's fight against invasive species every day in Florida. Burmese pythons and Cuban tree frogs are some of the animals that moved in uninvited. There's also this giant lizard, the Argentine black and white tegu. Tegus are coming out of hibernation right now and they're hungry. They eat eggs of native animals that conservationists want to protect.

Here's Robin Sussingham of member station WUSF.

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4:25pm

Tue March 18, 2014
Humans

The Science And Poetry Behind A Semi-Famous Sleep Talker

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 4:50 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Listen to this.

DION MCGREGOR: The horse she grabbed came out and peeked. Only peeked and then winked.

SIEGEL: Would you say that this speaker is A, reading a poem, B, out of his mind or C, asleep.

MCGREGOR: How are those waves? Yes, those waves, dark waves, lowering clouds, horseshoe crabs. It was all very, very timorous.

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3:00pm

Tue March 18, 2014
The Salt

Thank Your Gut Bacteria For Making Chocolate Healthful

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:50 pm

Bacteria in your gut can break down the antioxidants in chocolate into smaller, anti-inflammatory compounds.
Meg Vogel NPR

Boy, it's a good time to be a dark-chocolate lover.

We've noted before the growing evidence that a daily dose of the bitter bean may help reduce blood pressure. There also seems to be a link between a regular chocolate habit and lower body weight.

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1:13pm

Tue March 18, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Do We Know What Life Is?

Polar bears are a great example of natural selection and evolution. But how did this ball get rolling?
Remko de Waal AFP/Getty Images

Neil deGrasse Tyson and the Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey team dropped the ball in the episode on life and evolution that just aired.

It's not that Tyson and his team said anything wrong. So what was missing?

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11:30am

Tue March 18, 2014
The Two-Way

WATCH: Physicist Gets 'Smoking Gun' Proof Of His Theory

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 5:58 pm

Andrei Linde receives the "smoking gun" proof of his inflation theory from fellow physicist Chao-Lin Kuo.
Stanford University

When the news of a lifetime finally arrived at their door, Stanford physicist Andrei Linde and his wife wondered aloud if one of them was expecting a delivery.

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4:44am

Tue March 18, 2014
Space

Ripples In Space Could Point To The Universe's Beginnings

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 5:24 am

Physicists say they've discovered a faint signal from just moments after the universe began. If confirmed, it could revolutionize our understanding of the cosmos. But not everyone is convinced.

4:44am

Tue March 18, 2014
Space

Space Thief Or Hero? One Man's Quest To Reawaken An Old Friend

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 7:56 pm

Early days: NASA's International Sun-Earth Explorer C (also known as ISEE-3 and ICE) was undergoing testing and evaluation inside the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber when this photo was snapped in 1976.
NASA

More than 30 years ago, Robert Farquhar stole a spacecraft.

Now he's trying to give it back.

The green satellite, covered with solar panels, is hurtling back toward the general vicinity of Earth, after nearly three decades of traveling in a large, looping orbit around the sun.

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4:30pm

Mon March 17, 2014
News

Out Of Antarctica, A 'Grand Slam' That Leads Back To The Big Bang

Originally published on Mon March 17, 2014 6:33 pm

Physicists using data from an Antarctica telescope say they've observed evidence of primordial gravity waves — in other words, echoes of the Big Bang. If real, this may be a big advance for physics.

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