Science

6:14pm

Mon April 7, 2014
The Salt

Can Fish Farms Thrive In The USA?

Originally published on

Live tilapia are loaded into a truck bound for New York.
Dan Charles NPR

Why hasn't fish farming taken off in the United States?

It's certainly not for lack of demand for the fish. Slowly but surely, seafood that's grown in aquaculture is taking over the seafood section at your supermarket, and the vast majority is imported. The shrimp and tilapia typically come from warm-water ponds in southeast Asia and Latin America. Farmed salmon come from big net pens in the coastal waters of Norway or Chile.

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2:25pm

Mon April 7, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Sizing Up Your Children Is A Tricky Business

iStockphoto

When I had a second baby earlier this year, my three-year-old suddenly seemed enormous. "Check out the size of those feet!" I marveled. She seemed so heavy, so tall, so substantial.

She even seemed more capable, more robust. Images of airborne cookware and toppling bookshelves faded. The staircase didn't seem quite so treacherous. Instead, I trusted in her basic competence to scale the kitchen stools without incident and to keep (most) sharp-and-pointy things beyond the envelope of her person.

It wasn't just me: my husband reported the same experience.

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1:22pm

Sun April 6, 2014
Shots - Health News

Simple Blood Test To Spot Early Lung Cancer Getting Closer

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:32 pm

An artist's illustration shows lung cancer cells lurking among healthy air sacs.
David Mack Science Source

One of these days, there could well be a simple blood test that can help diagnose and track cancers. We aren't there yet, but a burst of research in this area shows we are getting a lot closer.

In the latest of these studies, scientists have used blood samples to identify people with lung cancer.

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6:38am

Sun April 6, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Is Anti-Gravity Possible? Brian Greene's WSU Has The Answer

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 9:16 am

Master science communicator Brian Greene shares the spotlight with Muppet scientist Dr. Bunsen Honeydew ahead of the 2008 World Science Festival in New York City.
Scott Gries Getty Images

4:26pm

Sat April 5, 2014
The Two-Way

An Astronaut Asks: What Does This Cloud Look Like?

Originally published on Sun April 6, 2014 9:54 am

Do you see what I see? That's the question Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield asks about this image he took from the International Space Station.
Cmdr_Hadfield

The image comes from Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield, who gained fans last year when he he tweeted photos from the International Space Station, along with his refreshingly wide-eyed excitement at being in orbit.

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5:40am

Sat April 5, 2014
Environment

Feds Hope $5 Billion Settlement A Lesson For Polluters

Originally published on Sat April 5, 2014 11:26 am

A sign at the old Kerr-McGee uranium mill site in Grants, N.M., warns of radioactive material. This week, the Justice Department announced a $5 billion settlement against the mining company to pay for the cleanup of toxic sites the company left across the U.S. over a period of more than eight decades.
Susan Montoya Bryan AP

This week, the federal government announced a record-breaking $5 billion settlement in a remarkable environmental case. The toxic legacy of the company involved, Kerr-McGee, stretches back 85 years and includes scores of sites across the country.

Kerr-McGee ran uranium mines in the Navajo Nation, wood-treating businesses across the Midwest and East Coast, and a perchlorate plant on a tributary of Lake Mead, the nation's largest reservoir — and it was messy.

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5:39am

Sat April 5, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

The Power Of Poop: A Whale Story

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:46 pm

Robert Krulwich NPR

This, I would think, should be self-evident: Generally speaking, big creatures eat smaller creatures that, in turn, eat even smaller creatures, like this ...

And just as obviously, one would expect the food chain to be pyramid-shaped: a few big creatures at the top eating more middle-sized creatures in the middle, that eat many, many, many little creatures at the bottom, like so:

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1:14pm

Fri April 4, 2014
Shots - Health News

Could A 'Barbie' Get Real? What A Healthy Fashion Doll Looks Like

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 3:35 pm

Look familiar? Artist Nickolay Lamm designed a doll to look like the average 19-year-old walking — or running — on the street.
Courtesy of Lammily

For decades, the Barbie doll has been slammed by parents for promoting an unhealthy female body image. Playing with a Barbie doll for just a few minutes may cause girls to limit their career ambitions, psychologists reported last month.

So why do we keep offering girls bone-thin dolls like Barbie and the popular Monster High crew, asks artist Nickolay Lamm?

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12:29pm

Fri April 4, 2014
The Two-Way

Scientists Say A Lake Superior Lurks On Saturn's Moon Enceladus

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 3:02 pm

A photo released by NASA in 2006 shows the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus as seen from the Cassini spacecraft.
AP

Water, water, everywhere ...

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12:03pm

Fri April 4, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Deconstructing The Philosophies Of 'RoboCop'

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:10 pm

Joel Kinnaman (left) as Alex Murphy and Gary Oldman as Dr. Dennett Norton in Robocop.
Kerry Hayes Columbia Pictures

I went to see the new RoboCop the other day with my colleague Hubert Dreyfus. As it happens, the movie features a character named Hubert Dreyfus. The character in the movie isn't based on Professor Dreyfus; it is an homage to him.

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