Science

1:08pm

Fri July 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Delaware Gets A Rare Out-Of-State Visitor: A 7-Foot Manatee

A manatee spotted in the Chesapeake and Delaware (C&D) Canal on Thursday. It's very unusual for the Florida native to get so far north.
Delaware Division of Fish and Wildlife

A manatee was seen swimming in a northern canal that joins the Chesapeake Bay with the smaller and shallower Delaware Bay just days after the marine mammal was spotted in an estuary of the Potomac River.

The docile "sea cow," is normally found in the warm waters of Florida and is a rare sight so far north.

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12:10pm

Fri July 24, 2015
The Salt

The Gene For Sweet: Why We Don't All Taste Sugar The Same Way

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 7:00 pm

"It now pays to get a lot of pleasure out of a little bit of sugar," says Danielle Reed, a scientist at the Monell Chemical Senses Center.
Ryan Kellman NPR

Sugar gives the human brain much pleasure. But not everyone revels in cupcakes with an inch of frosting, or milkshakes blended with candy bars, though these crazily sugary treats are increasingly the norm.

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10:39am

Fri July 24, 2015
Shots - Health News

Well-Off Baby Boomers Know How To Binge Drink, Too

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 5:35 pm

Youngsters aren't the only ones who have an affinity for consuming a lot of alcohol in a short amount of time – in other words, harmful drinking. It turns out, the parents and grandparents of millennials know how to binge drink, too.

Adults over age 50 who are healthy, active, sociable and well-off are more at risk for harmful drinking than their peers, according to a study published in the BMJ on Thursday.

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7:08pm

Thu July 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Maine Fisherman Catches His Second Rare Lobster

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 8:23 pm

Fisherman Bill Coppersmith named the rare lobster "Captain Eli" after his grandson.
Robert F. Bukaty AP

Bill Coppersmith, a fisherman in Maine, might want to buy a lottery ticket. He's gotten pretty lucky lately. This week he caught a rare orange lobster while fishing with his sternman Brian Skillings, writes the Portland Press Herald.

The paper talked to Robert Bayer, executive director of The Lobster Institute at the University of Maine, who said that the actual odds of catching an orange lobster would just be a guess. But "it's one in several million, there's no doubt about that," he said.

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6:33pm

Thu July 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Live Samples Of Anthrax Were Sent Worldwide In May Due To Ineffective Procedure

The lab at Dugway Proving Ground in Utah failed to completely kill live samples of anthrax before sending it around the world.
Jim Urquhart AP

The Department of Defense says that the Army's Dugway Proving Ground in Utah failed to completely kill samples of anthrax in May before it shipped them to dozens of other labs around the world.

NPR's Geoff Brumfiel reports that the samples of anthrax the Pentagon thought were dead, were still alive:

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5:53pm

Thu July 23, 2015
Space

NASA Announces Discovery Of Earth-Like Planet Around Distant Star

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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5:51pm

Thu July 23, 2015
Health

What If Chemo Doesn't Help You Live Longer Or Better?

Originally published on Fri July 24, 2015 11:10 am

For best quality of life, many cancer patients who can't be cured might do best to forgo chemo and focus instead on pain relief and easing sleep and mood problems, a survey of caregivers suggests.
iStockphoto

Chemotherapy given to patients at the end of life often does more harm than good, according to a study that calls into question this common practice.

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5:51pm

Thu July 23, 2015
Space

Looking For Earth-Like Planets Provides Clues For Finding 'Life Like Ours'

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 6:14 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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1:35pm

Thu July 23, 2015
The Two-Way

Kepler Telescope Introduces Earth To A Very Distant Cousin

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 4:24 pm

Artist's concept compares Earth (left) to the new planet, called Kepler-452b, which is about 60 percent larger in diameter.
NASA/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

NASA's planet-hunting Kepler Telescope has spotted the first roughly Earth-sized world orbiting in the "Goldilocks zone" of another star – offering perhaps the best bet so far for life elsewhere in the universe.

A year on Kepler-452b, which is about 1,400 light years from us in the constellation Cygnus, is 385 days, meaning its orbit is just a bit farther away from its star than the Earth is from the sun. That places it squarely within what planetary scientists call the habitable zone, or "Goldilocks" zone — not too cold and not too hot.

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8:54am

Thu July 23, 2015
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Putting Spiders On Treadmills In Virtual-Reality Worlds

Originally published on Thu July 23, 2015 2:50 pm

iStockphoto

The methodology described in a recent study, a peer-reviewed paper on animal behavior — in which biologists Tina Peckmezian and Phillip W. Taylor of Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia, worked with 56 female jumping spiders — is fascinating.

Here's what the biologists did:

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