Science

4:26pm

Thu June 18, 2015
Religion

Both Catholics, Non-Catholics Applaud Pope For Bold Remarks On Climate Change

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 8:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:26pm

Thu June 18, 2015
Environment

Pope Francis Calls For Urgent Action On Climate Change In Encyclical

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 8:58 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

3:23pm

Thu June 18, 2015
The Salt

In Search Of Edible Weeds: Adventures In Urban Foraging By App

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 7:11 am

Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) flower found on the sidewalk in Meridian Hill Park, Washington, D.C. It's edible, but isn't on "Wildman" Steve Brill's list of seven.
Ina Yang NPR

The next time you're out pulling weeds in the garden or stepping over a dandelion sticking out from the cracks of the sidewalk, consider where these wild greens could go: your salad bowl.

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3:12pm

Thu June 18, 2015
The Two-Way

NASA: Europa Spacecraft Goes Into Development Phase

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 8:21 pm

An image of Europa released by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., in 1996 by the Galileo spacecraft. NASA says a new probe dedicated to studying the Jovian moon, is going into the development phase.
NASA/JPL AP

NASA has moved a step closer to sending a probe to one of Jupiter's "Galilean" moons, Europa, which is believed to contain a vast liquid ocean that could harbor life underneath an icy surface crust.

In an announcement on Wednesday, the space agency said its mission concept for a Europa probe had completed its first major review and was now entering the development phase.

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2:34pm

Thu June 18, 2015
Shots - Health News

DNA Confirms Kennewick Man's Genetic Ties To Native Americans

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 9:07 pm

This clay facial reconstruction of Kennewick Man, who died about 8,500 years ago in what's now southeast Washington, was based on forensic scientists' study of the morphological features of his skull.
Brittney Tatchell/Smithsonian Institution

New genetic evidence suggests that Kennewick Man, an 8,500-year-old skeleton found in Washington state, is related to members of a nearby Native American tribe.

The DNA may help resolve a long-running scientific mystery, while at the same time reigniting a debate over who should have custody of the remains.

Kennewick Man was discovered accidentally in the mud flat along the Columbia River in 1996. He's caused a ruckus ever since.

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11:51am

Thu June 18, 2015
Shots - Health News

Surprise! Some Job-Based Health Plans Don't Cover Hospitalization

Hospital bills can be as painful as the injury that lands you there β€” especially if insurance doesn't cover the costs.
iStockphoto

Marlene Allen thought she had decent medical coverage after she fell in December and broke her wrist. She had come in from walking the dogs. It was wet. The fracture needed surgery and screws and a plate.

Weeks later, she learned her job-based health plan would cover nothing. Not the initial doctor visit, not the outpatient surgery, not the anesthesiology. She had $19,000 in bills.

"Make sure you find out what kind of plan it is" when employers offer coverage, advises Allen, who lives in northern Minnesota. "I thought health insurance was health insurance."

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9:15am

Thu June 18, 2015
The Two-Way

Pope Francis: Climate Change A 'Principal Challenge' For Humanity

Originally published on Thu June 18, 2015 10:59 am

Cardinals follow a news conference to present Pope Francis' encyclical "Laudato Si," or "Praise Be," at the Vatican on Thursday. The far-reaching papal letter addressed climate change and the poor.
Andrew Medichini AP

Pope Francis today issued a sweeping 184-page papal letter, writing that climate change is a global problem with far reaching environmental and social consequences β€” especially for the poor. He blamed apathy and greed and called on developing countries to limit the use of nonrenewable energy and to assist poorer nations.

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7:03am

Thu June 18, 2015
Shots - Health News

When Should Surgeons Stop Operating?

Originally published on Fri June 19, 2015 11:44 am

A program based at Sinai Hospital in Baltimore offers a two-day series of assessments for older surgeons, evaluating "physical and cognitive" function.
iStockphoto

Increased fatigue, forgetfulness, and reduced eyesight β€” these are some of the declines that can come with aging.

Certain professions keep a close watch for these sorts of changes, in hopes of protecting the public. And some jobs even have a firm age cutoff: Airline pilots are required to retire at 65, for example, and some firefighters must step down by 57. But there are no nationwide age-related cutoffs, required assessments or guidelines to make sure doctors can do their jobs safely.

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6:03pm

Wed June 17, 2015
The Two-Way

Worms Know What's Up β€” And Now Scientists Know Why

Researchers say that inside the head of the worm C. elegans, an antenna-like structure at the tip of the AFD neuron (highlighted in green) is the first identified sensor for Earth's magnetic field.
AndrΓ©s Vidal-Gadea

In what researchers say is a first, they've discovered the neuron in worms that detects Earth's magnetic field. Animals have been known to sense the magnetic field; a new study identifies the microscopic, antenna-shaped sensor that helps worms orient themselves underground.

The sensory neuron that the worm C. elegans uses to migrate up or down through the soil could be similar to what many other animals use, according to the team of scientists and engineers at The University of Texas at Austin.

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5:46pm

Wed June 17, 2015
Environment

Gambler-Turned-Conservationist Devotes Fortune To Florida Nature Preserve

Originally published on Wed June 17, 2015 7:22 pm

M.C. Davis, former gambler and businessman, stands in his 54,000-acre preserve, Nokuse Plantation, in the Florida Panhandle. It's the largest privately owned conservation area in the southeastern United States.
Matt Ozug NPR

You might think you know what frogs sound like β€” until, that is, you hear the symphony of amphibians that fills the muggy night air at Nokuse Plantation, a nature preserve in the Florida Panhandle.

There, about 100 miles east of Pensacola, a man named M.C. Davis has done something extraordinary: He has bought up tens of thousands of acres in the Florida sandhills and turned them into a unique, private preserve.

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