Science

12:03pm

Fri April 4, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Deconstructing The Philosophies Of 'RoboCop'

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:10 pm

Joel Kinnaman (left) as Alex Murphy and Gary Oldman as Dr. Dennett Norton in Robocop.
Kerry Hayes Columbia Pictures

I went to see the new RoboCop the other day with my colleague Hubert Dreyfus. As it happens, the movie features a character named Hubert Dreyfus. The character in the movie isn't based on Professor Dreyfus; it is an homage to him.

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9:28am

Fri April 4, 2014
TED Radio Hour

Does Money Make You Mean?

As a person's levels of wealth increase, their feelings of compassion and empathy go down, and...their ideology of self-interest increases. --Paul Piff
Margot Duane Courtesy of TED

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Money Paradox.

About Paul Piff's TEDTalk

Social psychologist Paul Piff describes how wealth changes behavior and how almost anyone's behavior can change when they're made to feel rich.

About Paul Piff

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9:28am

Fri April 4, 2014
TED Radio Hour

Could Your Language Affect Your Ability To Save Money?

Why is it that we allow subtle nudges of our language to affect our decision making? --Keith Chen
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Money Paradox.

About Keith Chen's TEDTalk

Behavioral economist Keith Chen says languages that don't have a future tense strongly correlate with higher savings.

About Keith Chen

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9:28am

Fri April 4, 2014
TED Radio Hour

Are We Wired To Be Bad With Money?

Why is it that we keep doing dumb things in the face of bad consequences? — Laurie Santos
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode The Money Paradox.

About Laurie Santos's TEDTalk

Psychologist Laurie Santos studies human irrationality by observing how primates make decisions — including some not-so-savvy money choices their human relatives often make.

About Laurie Santos

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7:14pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Shots - Health News

Shooting Unfairly Links Violence With Mental Illness — Again

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 9:05 am

Lt. Gen. Mark Milley speaks to reporters April 2 regarding the second shooting in five years on the Fort Hood Army post in Texas.
Drew Anthony Smith Getty Images

With the Army's disclosure that Army Spc. Ivan Lopez was being evaluated for post-traumatic stress disorder before he went on a shooting rampage Wednesday, there were once again questions about whether the Army could have prevented the violence at Fort Hood.

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6:27pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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2:14pm

Thu April 3, 2014
The Salt

Farmers Need To Get 'Climate Smart' To Prep For What's Ahead

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:39 pm

Farmers participate in a CGIAR climate training workshop on how to interpret seasonal rainfall forecasts in Kaffrine, Senegal.
Courtesy of J. Hansen/CGIAR Climate

The planet's top experts on global warming released their latest predictions this week for how rising temperatures will change our lives, and in particular, what they mean for the production of food.

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1:45pm

Thu April 3, 2014
The Two-Way

Smithsonian's Air And Space Museum To Get $30 Million Spiffier

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

Where's the moon rock? Curators say national treasures are often overlooked in the museum's current display, which hasn't changed much since 1976.
National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

Throngs of museum-goers mill through the grand entrance hall of the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., every day, gawking at such treasures as the Apollo 11 capsule that carried Neil Armstrong's crew to the moon and back, as well as Charles Lindbergh's Spirit of St. Louis airplane.

But the famous Milestones of Flight exhibit hasn't significantly changed since the museum opened in 1976.

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12:59pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Krulwich Wonders...

'Oh, Hello,' Says Andrew, As He Suddenly Grabs You By The Leg Or Neck

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 2:22 pm

Andrew Ucles YouTube

Some people like a nice walk, some a gentle run, others a cup of tea. But not Andrew Ucles. There is nothing relaxed about Andrew. You can find him chasing after wild animals on his videos, grabbing them with his bare hands and then, while they squiggle, scratch and lunge, he tells them, "Settle, settle," shows them to the camera, brags a little and lets them go.

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12:57pm

Thu April 3, 2014
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Joys And Ethics Of Insect Eating

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 2:57 pm

iStockphoto

A week ago today, I ate my first crickets.

It was a first step into entomophagy, the practice of insect eating. I wrote about this topic here at 13.7 in January but had never before tried it myself (excluding accidental ingestion of the insect parts often found in peanut butter, chocolate, vegetables and other foods).

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