Science

12:03pm

Fri October 12, 2012
NPR Story

Feds To Debate Marijuana As Medicine

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 1:45 pm

Transcript

IRA FLATOW, HOST:

Next Tuesday, marijuana will have its day in court because the United States Court of Appeals is set to hear arguments about the drug's therapeutic and medicinal effects. But some doctors, like one of my next guests, disagrees with the government's ban on medical use of marijuana, pointing to the drug's ability to suppress nausea, stimulate the appetite, relieve pain, improve sleep, even fight cancer cells, in test tubes at least.

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12:03pm

Fri October 12, 2012
NPR Story

The Secret To Making Ultrastrong 'Gorilla Glass'

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 1:45 pm

Corning's Gorilla Glass isn't totally unbreakable, as anyone who's dropped a smartphone knows. But it's twice as durable as regular glass--at half the thickness. How do they do it? Dave Velasquez, director of marketing and commercial operations for Gorilla Glass, talks about the innovations that make this ultrastrong, ultralight glass possible.

11:53am

Fri October 12, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Sun Goes Down. Up Comes A Mystery

minutephysics YouTube

Here's a question you probably didn't know was a question: Why is the sky dark at night?

My daughter asked me this about 10 years ago. We were looking up at the night sky, and she said, "There's lots of stars up there." And I said, "Yes."

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10:30am

Fri October 12, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Are The Mind And Life Natural?

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 4:12 pm

Do we really understand what's happening here?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Science has produced no standard account of the origins of life.

We have a superb understanding of how we get biological variety from simple, living starting points. We can thank Darwin for that. And we know that life in its simplest forms is built up out of inorganic stuff. But we don't have any account of how life springs forth from the supposed primordial soup. This is an explanatory gap we have no idea how to bridge.

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3:25am

Fri October 12, 2012
The Salt

Making 'The Science Of Good Cooking' Look Easy

Originally published on Fri October 12, 2012 5:36 am

Want a better-tasting gazpacho? Don't toss out the tomato seeds.
Carl Tremblay Photography America's Test Kitchen

Ever wondered why you're not supposed to bake with cold eggs or whether marinating really tenderizes meat? Read on.

America's Test Kitchen host Chris Kimball "whisks away" some cooking myths as he talks with Morning Edition host Renee Montagne about the book he wrote, The Science of Good Cooking, with fellow Cook's Illustrated magazine editors. Being the science and cooking geeks that we are, we tuned in.

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5:41pm

Thu October 11, 2012
Strange News

Study Connects Chocolate Eating To Nobel Prizes

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 8:00 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

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3:47pm

Thu October 11, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

How Cellphones Helped Researchers Track Malaria In Kenya

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 3:58 pm

More than 90 percent of Kenyans use mobile phones, giving scientists a powerful tool to track how diseases spread.
Simon Maina AFP/Getty Images

Cellphones are popping up all over in health care these days. They're monitoring our blood sugar, tracking the flu season and even mapping the junk food we eat at night.

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12:58pm

Thu October 11, 2012
The Salt

100 Years Ago, Maillard Taught Us Why Our Food Tastes Better Cooked

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 2:36 pm

A tower of profiteroles like this one, known as croquembouche, was created in France to celebrate Maillard, the man credited with identifying a key reaction in food science.
Gavin Tapp via Flickr

A few hundred scientists gathered in the small French city of Nancy recently to present scientific papers related to a chemical reaction. Now that may seem a bit humdrum and hardly worth mentioning in The Salt, but in this case, it isn't.

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12:35pm

Thu October 11, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

Bioethicists Call For Privacy Protections For Personal Genomes

Would you like a genome with that?
iStockphoto.com

When a stranger can gain access to someone's entire genetic code by picking up a used coffee cup, it presents a whole new thicket of concerns about privacy and security.

Actually, we're already there, though we're still in the early stages of what's shaping up, after all the years of hype, as a genuine revolution. Just take a look at Rob Stein's recent series on the $1,000 genome to see how far we've come and where we're headed.

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10:19am

Thu October 11, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

On Human Compassion: Encountering The Dalai Lama's Scientific Mind

Originally published on Thu October 11, 2012 11:09 am

The Dalai Lama
Stephen Salpukas Courtesy College of William & Mary

Yesterday I sat in the presence of a spiritual leader and felt the power of a mind that practices contemplative Buddhism and embraces modern science.

His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Buddhist monk and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, spoke Wednesday to a crowd of 8,000 students, faculty, staff and members of the community at an arena at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. His central message, about the transformational strength of human compassion, was straightforward yet profound.

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