Science

11:38am

Wed December 5, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Recreating The Universe In The Lab

ESO's ALMA project. Another way is to watch what happens when tiny particles are smashed together in "labs" such as the LHC at CERN." href="/post/recreating-universe-lab" class="noexit lightbox">
One way we make sense of the cosmos is to study what's in it, objects like this brown dwarf (artist's impression) observed by the ESO's ALMA project. Another way is to watch what happens when tiny particles are smashed together in "labs" such as the LHC at CERN.
M. Kornmesser ALMA/ESO/NAOJ/NRAO

The study of cosmology, the branch of the physical sciences that investigates the universe and its properties, presents quite a practical challenge: contrary to most other sciences, where different samples can be probed and analyzed directly, it's impossible to experiment with different universes in the lab.

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10:26am

Wed December 5, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

Strange Looking Tombstone Tells Of Moving Ice, Ancient Climates And A Restless Mind

Originally published on Wed December 5, 2012 12:39 pm

Encyclopaedia Britannica UIG via Getty Images

With glaciers melting and crumbling all over the world, let me tell you the story of the man who first imagined ice ages, the man buried under this stone in Cambridge, Mass. It's an odd gravestone; a rough, clumpy hunk of granite that doesn't look at all like the other markers at Mt. Auburn Cemetery.

That's because it isn't. It's an erratic. A single stone found sitting downhill from a glacier in Switzerland that was lifted, packed, shipped to all the way to Massachusetts to honor this man.

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4:15pm

Tue December 4, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Welcoming Climate Skeptics Back To Science

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 5:47 pm

A wake-up call? The Rockaways area in New York after Sandy.
Brigitte Dusseau AFP/Getty Images

It was a revolution in the deepest sense of the word. A new science, quantum mechanics, was sweeping across physics. Its advocates were piling up impressive explanations for new phenomena while its detractors stood on the sidelines complaining bitterly that none of it made sense. Surveying the progress and the carnage one of the new science's founders, Max Planck, penned these now famous words:

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2:18pm

Tue December 4, 2012
Mental Health

The Challenges Of Treating Personality Disorders

Originally published on Tue December 4, 2012 3:33 pm

Personality disorders represent some of the most challenging and mysterious problems in the field of mental health. People suffering from antisocial personality disorder or obsessive compulsive personality disorder are often misdiagnosed. The effects on the sufferers and their families can be wrenching.

11:47am

Tue December 4, 2012
Krulwich Wonders...

New Superhero, 3,200 Years Old, Turns Air Into Wood Superfast

Robert Krulwich NPR

This is for you, Martina Navratilova, for you, Nolan Ryan, for you, Methuselah, for you, Jimmy Carter, and for all of you reading this if you're on the "wrong" side of 50 but still pumping. This week, we've got ourselves a role model, a poster boy for robust old age.

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5:03pm

Mon December 3, 2012
Space

NASA Scientists 'Very Careful' With New Mars Data

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 6:22 pm

This photo, taken by NASA's Curiosity rover, shows Mars' Gale Crater, where the rover has taken samples for chemical analysis. Scientists believe that at some point in the very distant past, there was a riverbed here.
AP

NASA is finally receiving data on Martian soil samples from Curiosity, its rover currently traversing the red planet. The results from the soil samples hint at something exciting, but rover scientists are making very sure not to raise expectations.

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11:05am

Mon December 3, 2012
The Salt

Caught: Lobster Cannibals Captured On Film Along Maine Coast

Originally published on Thu December 6, 2012 9:08 am

Maine scientists catch an adult lobster eating baby lobster for dinner.
Courtesy of Noah Oppenheim.

Step back, lobsters coming through!

This summer lobsters exploded in number along the Maine coast. There were so many crustaceans crawling along the ocean floor – and into fishermen's traps – that lobster prices plummeted. Many fishermen tied up their boats, and a price war even broke out between Canadian and Maine seafood distributors.

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10:41am

Mon December 3, 2012
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Learning Facts Through Fiction: An Imagined Encounter

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 12:31 pm

A Monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus) in Costa Rica
Yuri Cortez AFP/Getty Images

Alan turned off his Kindle, slightly nostalgic for the satisfying slap of a hardcover firmly closed and stowed as a souvenir of some imagined world. Things could change so quickly.

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3:23am

Mon December 3, 2012
Monkey See

Neil deGrasse Tyson Helps His New 'Bud' Superman Get A Glimpse Of Home

Originally published on Mon December 3, 2012 8:29 am

From Action Comics 14, Neil deGrasse Tyson greets Superman to help him with a problem.
DC Comics

On Monday's Morning Edition, Hayden Planetarium director and pop-culture go-to science guy Neil deGrasse Tyson tells NPR's David Greene the story of how he came to lend a hand to Superman.

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3:30pm

Sun December 2, 2012
Space

Signs Of Life On Mars? Not Exactly

Originally published on Sun December 2, 2012 5:06 pm

NASA's Mars rover Curiosity cut a wheel scuff mark into a wind-formed ripple at the "Rocknest" site to give researchers a better opportunity to examine the particle-size distribution of the material forming the ripple.
NASA/JPL-Caltech

The director of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory said last week that preliminary data showed the possibility that the agency's Mars Science Laboratory – the six-wheeled rover that landed on Mars in August — had found signs of carbon-containing molecules.

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