Science

9:56am

Fri May 17, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

What Did I Do Last Summer? Oh, I Discovered How To Make Babies Without Sex. And You?

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 11:26 am

Robert Krulwich NPR

Ah, if only all summers could be like June, July and August 1740 — when three young guys (and a 6-year-old and a 3-year-old) did a science experiment that startled the world. In those days, you could do biology without a fancy diploma. More people could play.

Read more

9:55am

Fri May 17, 2013
TED Radio Hour

When Is the Right Time To Give?

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 5:26 pm

Mark Bezos at TED University in 2011.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Mark Bezos' TEDTalk

Volunteer firefighter Mark Bezos tells a story of an act of heroism that didn't go quite as expected — but that taught him a big lesson: Don't wait to be a hero. Give now.

About Mark Bezos

Read more

9:55am

Fri May 17, 2013
TED Radio Hour

How Can You Give A Community Better Health?

Originally published on Fri December 20, 2013 9:37 am

Ron Finley, renegade gardener, says food is both the problem and the solution.
James Duncan Davidson TED

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Giving It Away.

About Ron Finley's TEDTalk

Ron Finley plants vegetable gardens in South Central LA — in abandoned lots, traffic medians, along the curbs. Why? For fun, for defiance, for beauty and to offer some alternative to fast food in a community where "the drive-thrus are killing more people than the drive-bys."

About Ron Finley

Read more

4:14pm

Thu May 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

A Small Shock To The System May Help Brain With Math

Originally published on Fri May 17, 2013 10:59 am

Ever get stuck on these?
iStockphoto.com

Stimulating the brain with a very small electrical current through the forehead could boost a student's ability to learn and remember basic mathematics, a provocative experiment suggests.

The work, published online Thursday by the journal Current Biology, could help those who struggle with mental arithmetic. But the study was small and the long-term effect wasn't profound.

Read more

2:37pm

Thu May 16, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Facing Cancer, With A Robot Surgeon By My Side

Many arms, one robot: the business end of the da Vinci system is seen in this media handout image from the manufacturer.
Mark Clifford Courtesy of Intuitive Surgical, Inc.

Eight days from now, I'll meet my robot surgeon for the first time. His name is da Vinci, and he'll be at work inside my body for about 4.5 hours. I can't wait.

On May 6, I was diagnosed with a rare form of endometrial cancer. The biopsy result came as a shock, because I have only a few mild symptoms, and they only began last month.

Read more

2:19pm

Thu May 16, 2013
Science

Looking Ahead With The Wonders Of Krulwich

In the latest installment of our "Looking Ahead" series, NPR science correspondent and Radiolab co-host Robert Krulwich talks about reporting on big ideas in imaginative ways, the old days at NPR and what he's wondering about today.

11:52am

Thu May 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

Human Scent Is Even Sweeter For Malaria Mosquitoes

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 1:13 pm

An Anopheles gambiae mosquito feasts on a human.
Jim Gathany CDC

People smell yummy to mosquitoes.

So yummy, in fact, that our scent is a big way the pesky insects track us down.

But just how much mosquitoes like Eau de Human may not be entirely up to the bugs.

Mosquitoes are more attracted to human odors when they're infected with the malaria parasite, scientists reported Wednesday in the journal PLOS ONE.

Read more

4:38am

Thu May 16, 2013
Health

Stem Cell Milestone Revives Intense Ethical Debate

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 5:56 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep.

We're going to look closely this morning at a dramatic advance in science.

GREENE: And also its far-reaching implications. The advance involves embryonic stem cell research.

INSKEEP: Which scientists see as a route to dramatic advances in medical treatment. Researchers have now figured out how to make embryonic stem cells that carry a specific individual's DNA.

Read more

3:04am

Thu May 16, 2013
Shots - Health News

Cloning, Stem Cells Long Mired In Legislative Gridlock

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 11:53 am

After President Obama overturned Bush-era policy restricting federal funding of embryonic stem cell research in 2009, Nebraska Right to Life led a protest of the research outside the University of Nebraska regents' meeting.
Nati Harnik AP

The news that U.S. scientists have successfully cloned a human embryo seems almost certain to rekindle a political fight that has raged, on and off, since the announcement of the creation of Dolly the sheep in 1997.

Read more

3:03am

Thu May 16, 2013
Research News

Water Trapped For 1.5 Billion Years Could Hold Ancient Life

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 9:25 am

This map, from the United States Geological Survey, shows the age of bedrock in different regions of North America. Scientists found ancient water in bedrock north of Lake Superior. This region, colored red, was formed more than 2.5 billion years ago.
United States Geological Survey

Scientists have discovered water that has been trapped in rock for more than a billion years. The water might contain microbes that evolved independently from the surface world, and it's a finding that gives new hope to the search for life on other planets.

The water samples came from holes drilled by gold miners near the small town of Timmins, Ontario, about 350 miles north of Toronto. Deep in the Canadian bedrock, miners drill holes and collect samples. Sometimes they hit pay dirt; sometimes they hit water, which seeps out from tiny crevices in the rock.

Read more

Pages