Science

11:53am

Fri May 24, 2013
NPR Story

Tackling New Tech In The Golden Years

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Smartphones, tablets and computers could help seniors stay connected to their communities and families. But a hefty price tag, steep learning curves, and designs meant for younger eyes and hands could keep some older adults from logging on. Guests discuss the best ways for seniors to tackle new technology, and how devices can be adapted to accommodate older users.

11:53am

Fri May 24, 2013
NPR Story

Tracking Killer Tornadoes

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

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11:53am

Fri May 24, 2013
NPR Story

Studies Question Potential Alzheimer's Treatment

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman, filling in for Ira Flatow today. Last year, researchers reported a breakthrough in treating Alzheimer's disease. They'd found a drug that appeared to reverse the symptoms of Alzheimer's in mice. The drug was already on the market, approved by the FDA to treat a type of skin cancer, meaning Alzheimer's patients could ask their doctors for a prescription, and some did.

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11:53am

Fri May 24, 2013
NPR Story

Reinventing Farming For A Changing Climate

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 2:58 pm

Transcript

FLORA LICHTMAN, HOST:

This is SCIENCE FRIDAY. I'm Flora Lichtman. You've likely heard of the legendary explorers Lewis and Clark, but maybe not of the U.S. Army explorer Stephen Harriman Long, an engineer who led a scientific expedition through the Great Plains 15 years after Lewis and Clark.

His expedition traveled through Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska. And what did his crew make of "America's Breadbasket"? A place wholly unfit for cultivation or agriculture, they said. On a map, the explorers labeled the Great Plains as the Great American Desert.

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9:58am

Fri May 24, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Can Anyone Learn To Be A Master Memorizer?

Originally published on Mon December 16, 2013 5:39 pm

Joshua Foer says that one past memory champion developed a technique to remember more than 4,000 binary digits in half an hour.
James Duncan Davidson

Part 3 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Joshua Foer's TEDTalk

Some people can memorize thousands of numbers, the names of dozens of strangers or the precise order of cards in a shuffled deck. Science writer and U.S. Memory Champion Joshua Foer shows how anyone can become a memory virtuoso, including him.

About Joshua Foer

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9:58am

Fri May 24, 2013
TED Radio Hour

Can Eyewitnesses Create Memories?

Originally published on Fri November 29, 2013 9:01 am

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser says, "all of our memories, put simply, are reconstructed memories."
TEDxUSC

Part 1 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Scott Fraser's TEDTalk

Forensic psychologist Scott Fraser studies how we remember crimes. He describes a deadly shooting and explains how eyewitnesses can create memories that they haven't seen. Why? Because the brain is always trying to fill in the blanks.

About Scott Fraser

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9:58am

Fri May 24, 2013
TED Radio Hour

How Do Experiences Become Memories?

Originally published on Mon January 27, 2014 4:37 pm

Daniel Kahneman says, "we tend to confuse memories with the real experience that gave rise to those memories."
James Duncan Davidson TED / James Duncan Davidson

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Memory Games.

About Daniel Kahneman's TEDTalk

Nobel laureate and founder of behavioral economics Daniel Kahneman goes through a series of examples of things we might remember, from vacations to colonoscopies. He explains how our "experiencing selves" and our "remembering selves" perceive happiness differently.

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8:45am

Fri May 24, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

Who's The Best Drinker? Dogs? Cats? Or Pigeons?

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:56 am

Newspix/Rex/Rex USA

Take a look at this.

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6:27pm

Thu May 23, 2013
Shots - Health News

Why You Have To Scratch That Itch

Originally published on Fri May 24, 2013 11:20 am

The origin of itch has confounded scientists for decades.
Oktay Ortakcioglu iStockphoto.com

Everybody itches. Sometimes itch serves as a useful warning signal — there's a bug on your back! But sometimes itch arises for no apparent reason, and can be a torment.

Think of the itchy skin disorder eczema, or the constant itching caused by some cancers. "A very high percentage of people who're on dialysis for chronic kidney disease develop severe itch that's very difficult to manage," says Dr. Ethan Lerner, an associate professor of dermatology at Harvard Medical School.

Scientists now say they've got a much better clue as to how itch happens.

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6:26pm

Thu May 23, 2013
The Salt

Inside A Tart Cherry Revival: 'Somebody Needs To Do This!'

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 11:29 am

At Michigan State University's Clarksville Research Station, researchers apply pollen by hand to tart cherry blossoms, in order to breed new varieties.
Dan Charles NPR

Some fruits, like apples, you can find anywhere. But others have gotten a little bit lost in today's global food business.

Take tart cherries, also known as sour cherries. Unlike sweet cherries, America's tart cherries are too fragile to ship very far, so most people never get to taste a fresh one.

They're typically frozen, then baked into that iconic American dessert, the cherry pie — and cherry pies aren't as popular as they used to be.

Yet the humble sour cherry is experiencing an unlikely renaissance — and the best may be yet to come.

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