Science

7:41am

Sat August 10, 2013
Science

When Power Goes To Your Head, It May Shut Out Your Heart

Originally published on Sun August 11, 2013 9:52 am

Neuroscientists have found evidence to suggest feeling powerful dampens a part of our brain that helps with empathy.
Vladgrin istockphoto.com

Even the smallest dose of power can change a person. You've probably seen it. Someone gets a promotion or a bit of fame and then, suddenly, they're a little less friendly to the people beneath them.

So here's a question that may seem too simple: Why?

If you ask a psychologist, he or she may tell you that the powerful are simply too busy. They don't have the time to fully attend to their less powerful counterparts.

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12:40pm

Fri August 9, 2013
The Salt

Wine Waste Finds Sweet Afterlife In Baked Goods

Originally published on Sat August 10, 2013 11:26 am

At her bakery in Costa Mesa, Calif., Rachel Klemek sells cabernet brownies made with a flour substitute derived from grape pomace, a byproduct of winemaking packed with nutrients known as polyphenols.
Mariana Dale NPR

When winemakers crush the juice from grapes, what's left is a goopy pile of seeds, stems and skins called pomace. Until several years ago, these remains were more than likely destined for the dump.

"The pomace pile was one of the largest problems that the wine industry had with sustainability," says Paul Novak, general manager for WholeVine Products, a sister company to winemaker Kendall-Jackson in Northern California.

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12:20pm

Fri August 9, 2013

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Space

Comet Dust Brings a Spectacular Sky Show

The annual Perseid meteor shower, produced by remnants of the Swift-Tuttle comet, is back. Dean Regas, outreach astronomer at the Cincinnati Observatory, says the best time to see streaks will be in the early morning hours of August 12.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Education

Reading, Writing, 'Rithmetic...and Respect?

Some psychologists say teaching emotional literacy in school is key to better behavior — and better grades. Marc Brackett and Maurice Elias, two experts in social emotional learning, talk about how emotional literacy is woven into a standard curriculum, and how it can tackle problems like bullying and absenteeism.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Global Health

New Vaccine Beats Malaria in Early Trials

Reporting in Science, researchers write of an intravenous vaccine that offered complete protection against malaria in a small clinical trial — but only after five doses. Anthony Fauci, head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, discusses steps needed to turn this early success into a practical vaccine.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Environment

Climate Update: Warming Temperatures

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration released its annual "State of the Climate" assessment. Deke Arndt, an editor of the report, discusses warming temperatures and other climate trends from 2012. Plus, Sol Hsiang, who studies climate and violence, discusses his research connecting rising temperatures to increases in human conflict.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Food

Biting Into the First In Vitro Burger

Dutch scientists cooked up the first hamburger made from laboratory-grown meat. Researcher Nicholas Genovese, who is studying stem cell lines for in vitro meat, and journalist Josh Schonwald, who ate the burger, give us their review.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Technology

Flexible Insect Protein Inspires Super Rubber

Resilin is a protein found in insects that allows them to jump long distances and beat their wings quickly. The material stores and releases energy due to its unique structure. Biomedical engineer Kristi Kiick is researching how to use these pliable proteins for medical purposes.

12:00pm

Fri August 9, 2013
Science

Desktop Diaries: Tim White

"People get really interested in learning about where they came from. It's genealogy writ large," says paleoanthropologist Tim White about evolutionary history. When White isn't hunting for remains of our human ancestors in Africa, he's stationed in his museum-like office at the University of California, Berkeley, where he's director of the Human Evolution Research Center.

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