Science

3:06am

Fri September 27, 2013
Research News

How Recycling Bias Affects What You Toss Where

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 6:07 am

iStockphoto.com

During an experiment, marketing professor Remi Trudel noticed a pattern in what his volunteers were recycling versus throwing in the garbage. He then went through his colleagues' trash and recycling bins at Boston University for more data.

He found the same pattern, says NPR's Shankar Vedantam: "Whole sheets of paper typically went in the recycling, but paper fragments went in the trash."

Same type of paper, different shapes, different bins.

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6:18pm

Thu September 26, 2013
The Two-Way

Scientists Find Sea Louse Has Tidal 'Body Clock'

The speckled sea louse.
Wikipedia Commons

One thing you can say about the diminutive speckled sea louse: it's always on time.

Scientists studying the tiny crustacean, a marine cousin of the wood-louse, found that it runs not one, but two internal clocks. Not only does the creature have a circadian rhythm, or so called "body clock" like most land-dwelling animals, including humans, but it also has a circatidal clock that follows the 12.4-hour cycle of the tide.

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4:51pm

Thu September 26, 2013
Environment

Drought Forces New Mexico Ranchers to Better Manage the Land

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 7:19 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

You're listening to ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News.

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12:39pm

Thu September 26, 2013
Shots - Health News

For A Price, Volunteers Endure Scientists' Flu Spritzes

Originally published on Thu September 26, 2013 3:01 pm

How much would a scientist have to pay you to get sick with the flu?
F.T. Werner iStockphoto.com

What would it take to persuade you to allow government researchers to squirt millions of live flu viruses up your nose?

A recently concluded project at the National Institutes of Health found, among other things, that $3,400 each was enough to attract plenty of volunteers.

"I am happy I could contribute in some way," says Kelli Beyer, 24, one of 46 healthy people who volunteered for the project. To get the money, the research subjects had to commit to several days of testing, then nine days in a hospital isolation ward once the virus was administered in a nasal spray.

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10:30am

Thu September 26, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

We Are All Part-Time Vegans Now

A salad of sunflower sprouts, grapefruit, and avocado waits to be served and eaten at a party in Washington, D.C.
Brendan Hoffman Getty Images for Girl Behind The Camera

Have you enjoyed a salad of greens and fresh veggies for lunch recently? Or a dinner of pasta (made without eggs), mixed with olives and tomatoes? If so, even if you ate cheese or meat or fish on other days, you're a part-time vegan.

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5:06am

Thu September 26, 2013
Animals

Ancient Fish Fossil Sheds Light On Modern Jaws

A newly discovered fossil of a fish in China changes what scientists know about the origins of jaws. It turns out, human jaws are remarkably similar to the jaw of this 419-million-year-old fish. That suggests jaws evolved much earlier than previously thought.

3:40pm

Wed September 25, 2013
The Two-Way

Ancient Fish With Strong Jawline Could Rewrite History Of Faces

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 4:18 pm

A reconstruction of Entelognathus primordialis, with the fossil find highlighted above.
Nature

As faces go, Entelognathus primordialis isn't much to look at, even for a fish.

But consider that the 419 million-year-old, armor-plated fish is the earliest known creature to have what humans might recognize as a face, according to research published Wednesday in Nature. That's mostly due to its bony, modern jaw.

As USA Today reports:

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12:27pm

Wed September 25, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Lessons From Beyond The Heliopause

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 2:13 pm

JPL-Caltech NASA

This month, for the first time in history, a probe built by humans left the confines of the solar system for the depths of interstellar space. NASA launched Voyager 1 in September 1977, when Jimmy Carter was president and I had just finished high school.

The era of interstellar travel, up to now the exclusive province of sci-fi, has officially begun.

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10:48am

Wed September 25, 2013
The Salt

Rooftop Farming Is Getting Off The Ground

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 3:03 pm

Stacey Kimmons and Audra Lewicki harvest lettuce at the Chicago Botanic Garden's 20,000-square-foot vegetable garden atop McCormick Place West in Chicago.
Courtesy of the Chicago Botanic Garden

From vacant lots to vertical "pinkhouses," urban farmers are scouring cities for spaces to grow food. But their options vary widely from place to place.

While farmers in post-industrial cities like Detroit and Cleveland are claiming unused land for cultivation, in New York and Chicago, land comes at a high premium. That's why farmers there are increasingly eyeing spaces that they might not have to wrestle from developers: rooftops that are already green.

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7:24am

Wed September 25, 2013
The Two-Way

Latest MacArthur Geniuses Include Sound Savior

Originally published on Wed September 25, 2013 11:59 am

Carl Haber, 2013 MacArthur fellow.
John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

This year's 24 recipients of MacArthur Foundation "genius grants" include a physicist whose work was inspired in part by an NPR report he heard a decade ago.

As Carl Haber of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory explains in a video posted by the foundation with Wednesday's awards announcements:

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