Science

12:17pm

Mon July 29, 2013
The Salt

Farm To Fido: Dog Food Goes Local

Originally published on Wed July 31, 2013 9:53 am

Producers of farm-to-dog-bowl food say the concept is more about locavorism and sustainability than about pampering pooches.
Heather Rousseau NPR

The email read: "We signed a contract for farm-to-bowl dog food product development today, I kid you not :)"

The note was from a friend, Wendy Stuart, who consults on food access and sustainability issues. Even so, our first reaction was: Really?

It's easy to dismiss the concept as the culinary equivalent of a diamond dog collar or a Versace pet bowl.

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10:02am

Mon July 29, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The 'Prisoner's Dilemma' Tests Women In And Out Of Jail

iStockphoto.com

3:00am

Mon July 29, 2013
Energy

Massive Solar Plant A Stepping Stone For Future Projects

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:33 pm

The Ivanpah solar project in California's Mojave Desert will be the largest solar power plant of its kind in the world.
Josh Cassidy KQED

The largest solar power plant of its kind is about to turn on in California's Mojave Desert.

The Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System will power about 140,000 homes and will be a boon to the state's renewable energy goals, but it was no slam dunk. Now, California is trying to bring conservationists and energy companies together to create a smoother path for future projects.

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4:58pm

Sun July 28, 2013
Science

The Rise Of Bloodsucking Insects You Can't Just Swat Away

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 6:24 pm

Steamy days, sultry nights and swarming bugs all make up the thrum of life in the heart of summer. But more and more, our summers are assaulted by the bloodsucking kind of bugs, namely mosquitoes and ticks.

More than a nuisance, new species can impact our health and indicate larger environmental trends.

Beautiful And Adaptable

One relative newcomer prowling the scene is the Asian tiger mosquito. Named for its unique markings, it is black with white stripes.

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4:58pm

Sun July 28, 2013
Environment

Conservationists Call For Quiet: The Ocean Is Too Loud!

Originally published on Sun July 28, 2013 6:24 pm

The beaked whale is one of the most vulnerable of all whale species to underwater noise pollution.
Robin Baird/Cascadia Research

Just about everything that we do in the water makes noise. When we ship goods from country to country, when we explore for oil and gas and minerals, when the military trains with explosives or intense sonar systems — the noise travels.

But these man-made noises are making it impossible for sea creatures to communicate with themselves, something that is integral to their survival. Michael Jasny, the director of the Marine Mammal Protection Project for the Natural Resources Defense Council, says we have to quiet down.

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4:36pm

Sun July 28, 2013
Science

'Batman' Style: How We Can See With Sound, Too

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 11:30 am

Echolocation is second nature to animals such as bats and dolphins. Can humans also find their way using sound as a tool?
Ian Waldie Getty Images

Birds do it. Bats do it. Now even educated people do it. Echolocation is the process used by certain animals to identify what lies ahead of them, by emitting sounds that bounce off objects.

Now a team of researchers has created an algorithm that could give the rest of us a chance to see with sound.

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7:07pm

Fri July 26, 2013
Shots - Health News

50 Years On, Research On Sex Can Still Be A Lightning Rod

Johnson with her fellow researcher and sometimes husband, William Masters. The pair helped legitimize the study of human sexuality.
AP

The world has changed a lot since a divorced mother of two teamed up with a St. Louis gynecologist to study the physiology of sex.

Masters and Johnson's first book, Human Sexual Response, made Virginia Johnson and William Masters household names in the 1960s. More than any other scientists before them, they approached sex as a biological process to be observed, measured and analyzed.

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5:15pm

Fri July 26, 2013
Shots - Health News

Hating On Fat People Just Makes Them Fatter

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 5:48 pm

The roots of obesity are complex and include genetics and other factors beyond individual choice, research shows.
iStockphoto.com

Don't try to pretend your gibes and judgments of the overweight people in your life are for their own good. Florida researchers have evidence that discriminating against fat people only makes them fatter.

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2:16pm

Fri July 26, 2013
Shots - Health News

Cyclo-What? A Nasty Stomach Bug Spreads In The Midwest

Originally published on Sat July 27, 2013 11:45 am

Cyclospora is a tough parasite that can survive for weeks outside the human body.
CDC

It seems like the Midwest is a hotbed for medical mysteries these days.

Earlier this week, scientists traced a brand-new virus to ticks in Missouri. Now disease detectives are hot on the trail of another puzzling pathogen in the heartland.

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12:08pm

Fri July 26, 2013
Animals

'Moth-ers' Shine a Light on Nighttime Beauties

Think moths are nothing more than drab, little brown fliers stalking your wool sweaters? The folks behind National Moth Week, happening now, want to change that perception. Rutgers University moth expert Elena Tartaglia describes the diversity of moths and the role that they play in nature, and gives some tips on how to become a "moth-er."

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