Science

2:04pm

Thu November 21, 2013
Shots - Health News

Reinventing The Condom With Easy-On Tabs And Beef Tendon

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 12:42 pm

One experimental condom has tabs on either side so it's easier to put on in the dark.
Courtesy of California Family Health Council

When you hear the term "next-generation condom," beef tendon probably isn't the first thing that pops into your mind.

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12:49pm

Thu November 21, 2013
World

Walking The World: 7 Years And Counting

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

Now to East Africa, where one man is currently on a journey of discovery.

(SOUNDBITE OF FOOTSTEPS)

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12:05pm

Thu November 21, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Ties That Bind Animals And Humans Alike

Originally published on Thu November 21, 2013 1:20 pm

Elephants at the Mashatu game reserve in Mapungubwe, Botswana.
Cameron Spencer Getty Images

Most of us — scientists and animal lovers alike — agree by now that chimpanzees and elephants, birds and bunnies, dolphins and dogs may all feel love and joy and grief.

When stories of animal emotion go viral, as recently happened with two inseparable dog brothers, one of whom acts as a seeing-eye dog for the other, we share them not because we're knocked out with surprise by what animals feel but because we're touched and uplifted.

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10:15am

Thu November 21, 2013
The Salt

Remember 'French Fries Cause Cancer'? Here's The Acrylamide Update

Originally published on Fri November 22, 2013 3:02 pm

French fries: There are probably other reasons besides acrylamide to avoid these tasty snacks.
iStockphoto

Back in 2002, french fry lovers around the world received a nasty bit of news: Those crunchy, fried strips of potato contained a known carcinogen. Now, all these years later, a new warning from the Food and Drug Administration has consumers once again puzzling over whether to fear the chemical acrylamide.

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5:04am

Thu November 21, 2013
The Salt

Organic Farmers Bash FDA Restrictions On Manure Use

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 3:34 pm

TK
Dan Charles/ NPR

Many organic farmers are hopping mad at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and their reason involves perhaps the most underappreciated part of agriculture: plant food, aka fertilizer. Specifically, the FDA, as part of its overhaul of food safety regulations, wants to limit the use of animal manure.

"We think of it as the best thing in the world," says organic farmer Jim Crawford, "and they think of it as toxic and nasty and disgusting."

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5:53pm

Wed November 20, 2013
World

At Climate Meeting, Tensions Rise Between Rich And Poor Nations

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:57 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

NPR's Richard Harris has covered the U.N. climate talks since the first treaty was negotiated in Rio de Janeiro in 1992. He's monitoring these new talks, and he joins us now to talk about this long-running argument over climate-related funding for the developing world. Richard, thanks for being here.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: My pleasure.

BLOCK: And we just heard Mr. Khan mention this goal of $100 billion in aid per year, starting in 2020. He thinks that's realistic. What does it look like from where you sit?

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5:53pm

Wed November 20, 2013
World

Poor Countries Push Rich Nations To Do More On Climate Change

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 6:57 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about climate change and a campaign being waged by some of the world's poorest countries. U.N. climate talks are underway in Warsaw right now. And there, a group of developing nations is demanding that wealthy countries accept responsibility for global warming, provide financial support and pay for losses due to climate change.

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12:31pm

Wed November 20, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

Why We (Should) All Love The Stars

Part of the ALMA array on the Chajnantor plateau of Chile points skyward to the Milky Way, our own galaxy. The center of our galaxy is visible as a yellowish bulge crossed by dark lanes, which are themselves huge clouds of interstellar dust.
José Francisco Salgado ESO

Millions of people read their horoscopes every day. They hope to find some kind of answer in those lines, as if the cosmos and its alignments had something to say directly to each one of us. Wouldn't it be wonderful if, indeed, the cosmos spoke to us this way?

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11:52am

Wed November 20, 2013
The Salt

Can A Fish Farm Be Organic? That's Up For Debate

Originally published on Wed November 20, 2013 2:34 pm

Employees at Pan Fish USA, a salmon fish farm, unload fish feed on Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Ron Wurzer Getty Images

This year, Americans are expected to buy more than $30 billion worth of organic grains, produce, coffee, wine and meats.

Some producers of farmed fish want the chance to get a cut of those profits, and retailers, who can charge a premium price for organic farmed fish, are with them. But an organic label for aquaculture is not coming easy.

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4:41pm

Tue November 19, 2013
The Two-Way

Researchers Find Ancient Seawater Had Twice The Salt

Originally published on Tue November 19, 2013 6:57 pm

A map showing the impact areas of a large asteroid or comet that struck the Chesapeake Bay some 35 million years ago.
U.S. Geological Survey

Scientists have discovered a pocket of ancient seawater that's been trapped underground near the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay since the time of the dinosaurs — strong evidence that the Atlantic Ocean was once much saltier than today.

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