Science

2:28pm

Tue December 3, 2013
The Two-Way

Man Killed In Shark Attack Off Maui

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 3:35 pm

Yet another shark attack in Hawaii, this time leading to the death of a man off Maui. It comes just three days after a woman survived a harrowing shark attack on the same side of the island.

The Associated Press reports that a shark bit the dangling foot of Patrick Briney, 57, of Stevenson, Wash., as he fished from a kayak between Maui and Molokini, a small island that is a popular diving and snorkeling spot.

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9:54am

Tue December 3, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Man Who Knew Comets

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 2:14 pm

In 1986, the European spacecraft Giotto looked into the heart of Halley's Comet as it approached the sun. Data from Giotto's camera were used to generate this enhanced image of the comet's potato-shaped nucleus, measuring roughly 15 kilometers across.
Halley Multicolor Camera Team/Giotto Project/ESA NASA

Imagine stepping into an elevator and bumping into Lou Reed or Maya Angelou or Paul Newman. What would you do? What would you say? And what if the legend you bumped into on your ride up the 32nd floor was none other than the father of the comet (kind of)?

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8:33am

Tue December 3, 2013
Krulwich Wonders...

How To Keep The Dust Off Your White Pants With 7 Desk Fans

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 4:53 pm

Copyright Heirs of Rube Goldberg

Once upon a time, you could crack open a radio, a telephone, a lawnmower, even a car, take it apart and figure out how it worked. No more. Pretty much everything we use these days comes with computer chips, which you can't really take apart. (I mean, you can, but all you'll find inside are a bunch of 1's and 0's with no obvious logic.) So car mechanics can snap a new chip into an engine, wait till it whirs and watch the gears come to life, but do they know what's going on in there? For most of us, chips are "black boxes." They work, but we don't know why.

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3:17pm

Mon December 2, 2013
Shots - Health News

Alleged Perils Of Left-Handedness Don't Always Hold Up

Lefties don't necessarily do everything with their left hand, and the ones who do might not use the right side of their brain for language.
iStockphoto

I recently stumbled upon a description of research out of Yale that suggested there was a link between left-handedness and psychotic disorders like schizophrenia.

Forty percent of those with psychotic disorders are lefties, one of the researchers said. That startled me. Only about 10 percent of people in the general population are left-handed. I'm one of them.

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2:25pm

Mon December 2, 2013
13.7: Cosmos And Culture

The Truth About The Left Brain / Right Brain Relationship

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 3:38 pm

It's time to rethink whatever you thought you knew about how the right and left hemispheres of the brain work together.
iStockphoto

Sometimes ideas that originate in science seep out into the broader culture and take on a life of their own. It's still common to hear people referred to as "anal," a Freudian idea that no longer has much currency in contemporary psychology. Ideas like black holes and quantum leaps play a metaphorical role that's only loosely tethered to their original scientific meanings.

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1:14pm

Mon December 2, 2013
The Two-Way

Comet ISON Is No More, NASA Says

Originally published on Tue December 3, 2013 6:02 pm

NASA took a series of images to create this "timelapse" view of comet ISON's trip around the sun.
NASA

Comet ISON, a "shining green candle in the solar wind," is no longer with us, NASA declared Monday morning in a tribute to what many hoped would be the "comet of the century."

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1:04pm

Mon December 2, 2013
The Salt

I'm Not Just Gaming, Ma! I'm Helping The World's Farmers

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 3:05 pm

Cropland Capture's developers hope players will find where crops are grown amid Earth's natural vegetation in satellite images to shine a light on where humanity grows its food.
Courtesy of the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis

There's no easy way to track all of the world's crops. What's missing, among other things, is an accurate map showing where they are.

But the people behind Geo-Wiki are hoping to fix that, with a game called Cropland Capture. They're turning people like you and me into data gatherers, or citizen scientists, to help identify cropland.

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8:24am

Sun December 1, 2013
Humans

Why You Can't Tickle Yourself

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Now, let's talk about something deeply philosophical - tickling. More specifically, why you can tickle someone else but you can't tickle yourself.

JAKOB HOHWY: It's a very basic kind of phenomenon that every child knows.

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5:21am

Sun December 1, 2013
Animals

Saving The Native Prairie — One Black-Footed Ferret At A Time

Originally published on Sun December 1, 2013 2:25 pm

Biologist Travis Livieri checks a briefly sedated ferret's health status inside an improvised trailer clinic.
Elizabeth Shogren NPR

American pioneers saw the endless stretches of grassland of the Great Plains as a place to produce grain and beef for a growing country. But one casualty was the native prairie ecosystem and animals that thrived only there.

Some biologists are trying to save the prairies and they've picked a hero to help them: the black-footed ferret. In trying to save this long skinny predator with a raccoon-like mask, the biologists believe they have a chance to right a wrong that nearly wiped a species off the planet.

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5:08pm

Sat November 30, 2013
Science

Putting A Price On 'Dueling Dinosaur' Fossils

What would you pay for a fossil of two complete dinosaurs locked in what seems to be a fight to the death? An auction house put that question to the test with the dinosaurs, discovered in 2006 in the Hell Creek formation of Montana. It got an unexpected answer.

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