Politics

4:22am

Tue January 15, 2013
Politics

Obama Urges Congress To Raise Debt Ceiling

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

In a looming battle over the federal debt ceiling, Republicans in Congress insist they hold the cards. They do have the power to stop federal borrowing, withhold payment of federal debts and cause unknown damage to the world economy. Some want to use that power to force President Obama to reduce federal spending in the way they want.

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6:54pm

Mon January 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Poll Says Gun Rights Supporters Fund Their Cause; Opponents Don't

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 7:20 pm

Rifles are displayed at a gun show in Marietta, Ga., on Dec. 22, 2012. A new poll shows overwhelming and bipartisan support for requiring criminal background checks before the sale of firearms at gun shows, as is already required before store sales.
Mike Stewart AP

A Pew Research Center survey on gun laws shows overwhelming support among Americans on a few issues, like closing the so-called gun show loophole; a wide partisan split on more contentious measures, like banning assault weapons; and a glimpse into why the nation's gun lobby may be so successful.

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5:58pm

Mon January 14, 2013
It's All Politics

Obama's Woman Problem Is A Problem Of His Own Making

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 2:45 pm

President Obama holds a news conference Monday in the East Room of the White House.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Does President Obama have a problem with women?

On the level of appearances, he certainly does. Which is why at his Monday news conference, he found himself responding to criticisms about the lack of diversity in his picks so far for his second-term Cabinet — State, Treasury, Defense and CIA — who have all been white men.

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4:56pm

Mon January 14, 2013
'Radio Diaries'

'Segregation Forever': A Fiery Pledge Forgiven, But Not Forgotten

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 8:17 pm

During his inaugural address on Jan. 14, 1963, newly elected Alabama Gov. George C. Wallace vowed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever."
Bettmann Corbis

It was just a single line in a speech given 50 years ago today. But that one phrase, "segregation now, segregation tomorrow and segregation forever," is remembered as one of the most vehement rallying cries against racial equality in American history.

The year was 1963. Civil rights activists were fighting for equal access to schools and the voting booth, and the federal government was preparing to intervene in many Southern states.

And on Jan. 14, in Montgomery, Ala., newly elected Gov. George Wallace, a Democrat, stepped up to a podium to deliver his inaugural address.

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4:55pm

Mon January 14, 2013
Politics

Dear Mr. President: What Do You Want Obama To Remember?

Becky Lettenberger NPR

President Obama will soon be sworn into office, and whether you voted for him or not, he's everybody's president. What do you want him to remember in his second term?

Share your thoughts at http://inauguration2013.tumblr.com/

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

1:54pm

Mon January 14, 2013
The Two-Way

Elder President Bush Released From Hospital

Former President George H.W. Bush in June.
Michael Loccisano Getty Images for HBO

After nearly two months in a Houston hospital, where he spent some of the time in intensive care for treatment of complications related to bronchitis, an infection and a stubborn fever, former President George H.W. Bush was sent home today.

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1:51pm

Mon January 14, 2013
Politics

The Accomplishments, Shortcomings Of Obama's First Term

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 3:00 pm

Transcript

CELESTE HEADLEE, HOST:

This is TALK OF THE NATION. I'm Celeste Headlee in Washington. Neal Conan is away. This Sunday, Barack Obama will be officially sworn in for his second term as the 44th president of the United States. But today as Washington gears up for four more years, we wanted to look back at the first term, from health care to gay marriage to Afghanistan and Guantanamo Bay.

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1:16pm

Mon January 14, 2013
Author Interviews

Retired Bishop Gene Robinson On Being Gay And Loving God

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 2:25 pm

Gene Robinson, the first openly gay bishop in the Episcopal Church, has retired. He'll start working with the Center for American Progress, a progressive research and policy organization, on issues of faith and gay rights.
BProud Photography Knopf

For many years, it didn't occur to Bishop Gene Robinson — the first openly gay bishop in the Episcopal Church — that he might retire before age 72, the mandatory retirement age for Episcopal bishops. But then, in 2010, Mary Glasspool, who is also openly gay, was elected bishop suffragan in the Diocese of Los Angeles and, for the first time, Robinson reconsidered his retirement plans.

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12:26pm

Mon January 14, 2013
U.S.

In News Conference, Obama Calls For Raising Debt Ceiling

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 3:27 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

I'm David Greene. We'll begin NPR's business news with a warning from President Obama.

(SOUNDBITE OF PRESS CONFERENCE)

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12:14pm

Mon January 14, 2013
Latin America

Guantanamo Bay Still Unresolved

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 4:56 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin.

Coming up, we'll talk about why the Peace Corps is stepping up its efforts to recruit doctors and nurses to its ranks of people serving in developing countries. That's ahead.

But first, President Barack Obama is just about a week away from being sworn into his second term in office. So we have been looking at some of the unresolved issues from his first four years. Last week, we talk about housing, particularly the foreclosure crisis.

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