Politics

6:14am

Thu June 13, 2013
National Security

NSA Head Tells Senate His Agency Didn't Do Anything Wrong

NSA Director Keith Alexander told a Senate panel that his agency's program did indeed protect American's privacy while gathering data on terrorist activity. Alexander told lawmakers he wants to declassify more details to reassure everyone the programs are legal and effective.

6:55pm

Wed June 12, 2013
It's All Politics

Mass. Senate Race May Be Feeling Washington Scandal Fallout

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 8:12 pm

Recent polls suggest Massachusetts Republican Gabriel Gomez (left) is within striking distance of Rep. Ed Markey (right) in a contest for a U.S. Senate seat.
AP

With two weeks until the Massachusetts special Senate election, the obvious question is: Can Republicans pull off another stunning upset like they did three years ago?

Back then, in the very blue Bay State, Republican Scott Brown won the seat left vacant by Ted Kennedy's death by riding a Tea Party and anti-Obamacare wave amplified by voter distress over a sour economy.

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3:06pm

Wed June 12, 2013
All Tech Considered

A Guide To Tech Terms In The NSA Story

Peter Hoffman for NPR

2:11pm

Wed June 12, 2013
Politics

The Legacy Of Watergate And The Semantics Of Scandals

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:34 pm

Forty years after the Senate committee hearings on the Watergate scandal, Political Junkie Ken Rudin talks with Lowell Weicker, who served on the Senate Watergate committee. Former White House speechwriters Paul Glastris and Peter Robinson talk about writing speeches amid scandal.

10:58am

Wed June 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Public's Opinion Of George W. Bush Is Turning Positive

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:24 am

Former President George W. Bush and his successor, President Obama, at the April 25 dedication of Bush's library on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas.
Larry W. Smith EPA /LANDOV

For the first time since 2005, when George W. Bush was in the Oval Office, the public's opinion of the former president is "more positive than negative," the pollsters at Gallup say.

Gallup says its latest polling shows:

-- 49 percent of those surveyed have a favorable opinion of the former president.

-- 46 percent have an unfavorable opinion of Bush.

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4:41am

Wed June 12, 2013
National Security

Surveillance Revelations Spark Lackluster Public Discord

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

When a former IT contractor at the National Security Agency gave The Guardian U.S. government surveillance information, he told the paper that his only motivation was to spark a public debate about government surveillance.

"This is something that's not our place to decide," Edward Snowden said. "The public needs to decide whether these programs and policies are right or wrong."

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4:41am

Wed June 12, 2013
Politics

Obama Urges Congress Not To 'Block' Immigration Bill

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 5:53 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. The U.S. Senate has opened debate on a sweeping immigration bill. And President Obama says it's the best chance in years to fix what he calls a broken immigration system. The measure took a step forward yesterday when a big, bipartisan majority of senators voted to take up the bill. But it still faces serious obstacles, as NPR's Scott Horsley reports.

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7:15pm

Tue June 11, 2013
Law

Privacy In Retreat, A Timeline

President Bush signs the Patriot Act Bill during a ceremony in the White House East Room on Oct. 26, 2001.
Doug Mills AP

Viewed out of context, recent Washington revelations paint a disturbing portrait of the vast amount of electronic data the nation's spy agencies are collecting. But the blockbuster news stories belie a simple truth: Personal privacy rights have been under sustained assault since well before the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. And it's not just government that's vacuuming up information.

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5:58pm

Tue June 11, 2013
It's All Politics

What Did Congress Really Know About NSA Tracking?

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, is among the lawmakers who say they were never briefed about the government's surveillance programs.
T.J. Kirkpatrick Getty Images

If you're a member of Congress and you didn't know about the National Security Agency's phone records program before it was disclosed last week, President Obama has this to say to you: Where have you been?

"When it comes to telephone calls, every member of Congress has been briefed on this program," Obama said to reporters last Friday.

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5:08pm

Tue June 11, 2013
Shots - Health News

Administration's Plan For Morning-After Pill Pleases No One

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 6:20 pm

Plan B One-Step might be the only emergency contraceptive available to all ages without a prescription.
ASSOCIATED PRESS

Reaction was swift to the Obama administration's announcement Monday night that it was dropping a long-running legal battle to keep age restrictions on one type of the morning-after birth control pill.

But like just about everything else in this decade-long controversy, the latest decision has pleased just about no one.

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