Politics

7:52pm

Thu June 27, 2013
It's All Politics

Senate's Immigration Joy Could Turn To Ashes In House

The Senate's "Gang of Eight" on the immigration overhaul legislation became a gang of 68 when all was said and done Thursday.

And that number is important, especially to the senators. Supporters of the immigration bill in the Democratic-controlled Senate have said a strong bipartisan Senate vote for the legislation would put enough pressure on the House to force it to take up comprehensive legislation.

If the Senate couldn't get to 70 votes, the thinking went, nearing that mark could give an immigration overhaul unstoppable momentum in Congress.

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6:40pm

Thu June 27, 2013
It's All Politics

Rick Perry Co-Stars In Texas Political Drama

The fight over restrictive abortion legislation in Texas has given Gov. Rick Perry a chance to underscore his conservative credentials.
Tony Gutierrez AP

An irony of the recent Texas political theater: Democratic state Sen. Wendy Davis' filibuster aimed at stopping anti-abortion legislation raised not only her profile but that of Republican Gov. Rick Perry.

Shortly after Davis' talkathon ran out the clock on a bill that would potentially have made abortions much harder for women in Texas to obtain after 20 weeks of pregnancy, Perry put himself back in the national headlines.

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6:18pm

Thu June 27, 2013
It's All Politics

Inspector General Changes Tune On IRS Scandal

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 1:10 pm

Outgoing acting Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Steve Miller (right) and Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration J. Russell George are sworn in before a full House Ways and Means Committee hearing in May.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

Changing its story. Walking it back. Clarifying.

Whatever you call it, the IRS inspector general now has a different account of what investigators knew about the ideologies of the groups that underwent extra scrutiny as they sought tax-exempt status.

Inspector General J. Russell George explained in a letter released Thursday morning that investigators knew all along "progressives" were listed in documents used by IRS agents to screen applications.

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5:44pm

Thu June 27, 2013
Africa

Equality, Human Rights The Themes Of Obama's Africa Tour

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. In Senegal today, President Obama had a full schedule: a visit to the presidential palace, a news conference, meetings with Supreme Court justices from around Africa, and a tour of a slave port. Through it all, the president kept returning to themes of equality and human rights, as NPR's Ari Shapiro reports from Dakar.

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5:00pm

Thu June 27, 2013
Shots - Health News

Maine Once Again Allows Mail-Order Canadian Drugs To Cut Costs

Originally published on Fri June 28, 2013 12:03 pm

They're back: Cheaper mail-order medications from Canada and other foreign lands.
iStockphoto.com

It's deja vu all over again in Maine.

For the first time in years, a state has acted to allow its citizens to purchase prescription drugs by mail from other countries. The idea is to take advantage of those nations' lower prices, which can be half the cost of those at American pharmacies.

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4:28pm

Thu June 27, 2013
The Two-Way

Senate Approves Sweeping Immigration Overhaul, In Final Vote

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:19 pm

The Senate has passed a sweeping immigration bill, widely seen as the product of the "Gang of 8," a group that includes Sens. John McCain, R-Ariz. (left), and Sen. Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. The two shook hands before Thursday's final vote.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The Senate approved a sweeping immigration bill Thursday, endorsing a bill that would put millions of immigrants who illegally entered the United States on a path to citizenship. The final vote tally on the bill was 68 in favor, with 32 opposed.

The bill also includes measures that would punish employers who take advantage of immigrant workers, as well as providing billions in spending to employ fences and high-tech tools to help secure the border between the U.S. and Mexico.

All 52 Democratic senators voted for the bill, along with 14 Republicans and two independents.

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4:04am

Thu June 27, 2013
Business

Agriculture's Waning Influence In Washington Hinders Farmers

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. Good morning, I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne.

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7:05pm

Wed June 26, 2013
The Two-Way

Texas Legislators Called Back For Special Session On Abortion Bill

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 7:33 pm

Members of the gallery in the Capitol in Austin played a role in a vote on an abortion bill taking place after an official deadline. "We will not allow the breakdown of decorum and decency to prevent us from doing what the people of this state hired us to do," Gov. Rick Perry said Wednesday, in calling for a special session.
Eric Gay AP

After a vote on a controversial bill to restrict abortion in Texas was deemed to have fallen outside of the state's legislative session, Gov. Rick Perry has called for a special session to take up the issue, along with other topics. The session is scheduled to begin July 1 at 2 p.m., ET.

As our colleague Elise Hu reported, the proposed abortion law inspired a filibuster attempt from state Sen. Wendy Davis, a Democrat from Fort Worth:

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6:19pm

Wed June 26, 2013
It's All Politics

The Wendy Davis Rocket Ride

Originally published on Wed June 26, 2013 8:49 pm

State Sen. Wendy Davis talks with fellow senators before her 11-hour filibuster attempt on Tuesday.
Eric Gay AP

Overnight, Texas state Sen. Wendy Davis became a national political name and a hero to abortion-rights supporters around the country.

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6:02pm

Wed June 26, 2013
U.S.

Being Postmaster General Isn't What It Used To Be

Originally published on Thu June 27, 2013 5:34 am

Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe, in 2011, appears before a Senate committee looking into the Postal Service's economic troubles.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

The job of postmaster general was once one of the country's most politically powerful. It is also one of the oldest; a version of the position existed before the Declaration of Independence.

But today, Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe finds himself continually caught in the political crossfire. Donahoe is tangling with unions and members of Congress over how to manage the Postal Service's future — as it faces huge losses, dwindling mail volume and ballooning costs.

It may seem strange now, but Donahoe was originally drawn to postal work by the money.

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