Jazz

4:50pm

Tue November 18, 2014
Jazz Night In America: Wednesday Night Webcasts

Revive Big Band At Berklee

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 2:16 am

Igmar Thomas leads the Revive Big Band in concert.
Denika Peniston Courtesy of Revive Music Group

3:18pm

Tue November 18, 2014
World Cafe

'Heathens From The Bayous': Cajun And Creole Culture In Lafayette

Michael Doucet.
John Vettese XPN

On today's installment of World Cafe's Sense Of Place visit to Lafayette, La., we speak with Michael Doucet, who plays Cajun, Creole, zydeco and other traditional music as a founding member and fiddler of Lafayette band BeauSoleil.

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5:52pm

Sat November 15, 2014
Music Interviews

When The Lights Go Down, Who Will Hear 'The Last Transmission'?

Originally published on Sat November 15, 2014 9:35 pm

Filmmaker and musician Melvin Van Peebles' new album with the London band The Heliocentrics is titled The Last Transmission.
Courtesy of the artist

A lot of popular musicians in the 1960s and '70s showed a passionate interest in getting extremely high — higher than any human had ever been.

We're talking, of course, about space exploration. David Bowie, Pink Floyd, Sun Ra, Funkadelic; all contributed to our shared space mythology. That doesn't happen so much these days.

But a new record from London band The Heliocentrics is a welcome, and trippy, exception.

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1:42am

Thu November 13, 2014
Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program

Very Very Henry Threadgill

Originally published on Mon December 1, 2014 11:35 am

Henry Threadgill conducts the Society Situation Dance Band at the Very Very Threadgill festival.
Shahar Azran Courtesy of Harlem Stage

Henry Threadgill's music has always pushed boundaries. Two tubas with two guitars, a "sextett" with seven members, a free-improvising trio with an instrument made of hubcaps, a dance orchestra: Nothing is off the table.

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12:34pm

Fri November 7, 2014
Marian McPartland's Piano Jazz

Pete Jolly On Piano Jazz

Pete Jolly on the cover of Herb Alpert Presents.
Courtesy of the artist

A vital force on the West Coast jazz scene, Pete Jolly was a pianist and accordionist known for his movie soundtracks and television themes, including Get Smart, Dallas and M*A*S*H.

On this episode of Piano Jazz from 1986, Jolly showcases his swinging piano style with a solo in "You, The Night And The Music"; then, host Marian McPartland joins in for a performance of "Barbados." McPartland solos in "Close Enough For Love," and the two performers create a rousing finale as they play a two-person version of "Oleo."

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2:08pm

Thu November 6, 2014
All Songs Considered

Viking's Choice: Kid Millions & Jim Sauter, 'Game Jump'

Jim Sauter (left) and Kid Millions, blowin' your ears out.
Lisa Corson Courtesy of the artist

In the noise-improv trio Borbetomagus, Jim Sauter hooks bells with Don Dietrich to obliterate any notion you have of the saxophone (sorry, birthday boy Adolphe Sax). In Oneida and Man Forever, Kid Millions is a psychedelic shaman of the drums. In "Game Jump," Sauter issues a brief warning that sounds something like a zombie-infested cruise ship bellowing its final notes before it plummets into a blood-freezing ocean. Then it's on.

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11:53am

Thu November 6, 2014
Jazz Night In America Videos

Jon Batiste Leads A Private Street Parade Atop A Fort

Originally published on Fri November 7, 2014 10:25 am

Mito Habe-Evans NPR

Jon Batiste is from New Orleans, where a street parade might assemble around the corner on any given day. Evidently, he likes a good walkabout: He's liable to lead his band at a guerrilla concert in the New York City subway, or out of a venue, or — as he did at the Newport Jazz Festival — off stage and into the audience.

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11:04am

Thu November 6, 2014
All Songs Considered

Sax Ed: The NPR Music Saxophone Quiz

Adolphe Sax's invention has found its way into many styles of music. Here, Clarence Clemons plays the tenor sax with Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band in Lexington, Ky., in 1984.
Lexington Herald-Leader Getty Images

In November 1814, Col. Andrew Jackson marched on Pensacola, taking the Florida city away from Britain and Spain, while the Congress of Vienna was busy drawing new boundaries after the Napoleonic Wars. And 200 years ago today, in a little 10th-century town south of Brussels, Adolphe Sax was born.

Sax learned instrument-building from his father and soon was inventing new instruments of his own, including the one that bears his name. He patented the saxophone in 1846.

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2:28am

Thu November 6, 2014
Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program

Identities Are Changeable

Originally published on Wed November 19, 2014 11:46 pm

Miguel Zenón performs from Identities Are Changeable at the Newport Jazz Festival.
Adam Kissick for NPR

Miguel Zenón, the prolific alto saxophonist and composer, has just released a new album called Identities Are Changeable. Based on his interviews with fellow Puerto Ricans living in New York, he's arranged a new book of music to reflect their varying experiences.

Jazz Night in America recorded this unique work live from the 2014 Newport Jazz Festival, and accompanies Zenón to his old stomping grounds in the Bronx.

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2:11am

Thu November 6, 2014
Jazz Night In America: The Radio Program

A Night At The Museum

Originally published on Thu November 13, 2014 12:10 am

Emmet Cohen performs at the Rubin Museum of Art.
NPR

Jazz musicians find inspiration in many things. Himalayan art is not typically one of them.

Jazz Night in America visits the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City to hear interviews and live performances from each of the five finalists for the American Pianists Association's Cole Porter Fellow In Jazz: Kris Bowers, Emmet Cohen, Sullivan Fortner, Zach Lapidus and Christian Sands. Hear what visually inspires some of the most promising young jazz talent, from mandalas to fish.

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