Business

5:06pm

Thu December 11, 2014
The Salt

Why The White House Wants To Go After Seafood Pirates

Originally published on Sun December 14, 2014 10:02 pm

A crab pot full of snow crabs, fished out of the Bering Sea.
Josh Thomas Courtesy of WWF

Americans eat more seafood than just about anyone else. Most of it is imported from abroad. And a lot of it — perhaps 25 percent of wild-caught seafood imports, according to fisheries experts — is illegally caught.

The White House is now drafting recommendations on what to do about that. Fisheries experts say they hope the administration will devote more resources to fight seafood piracy.

Read more

4:38pm

Thu December 11, 2014
Movies

Hacked Sony Emails Pull The Curtain Back On Hollywood

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 6:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Read more

4:30pm

Thu December 11, 2014
Economy

Controversial Budget Bill Would Roll Back Dodd-Frank Provision

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 6:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:30pm

Thu December 11, 2014
Planet Money

Iceland Experiments With A Jubilee Of Debt Forgiveness

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 6:39 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Read more

4:18pm

Thu December 11, 2014
All Tech Considered

Weekly Innovation: A Smart Power Outlet That Can't Shock You

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 2:21 pm

Normal outlets are always live at 120 volts, but the Brio Safe uses embedded sensors to accurately identify a plug before delivering a current.
Brio

If you're a parent, you know the aggravation that comes with baby-proofing an entire house. Probably one of your biggest fears is that your child might stick her finger or a foreign object into an electrical outlet.

More than 30,000 non-fatal shock accidents occur annually, according to the Electrical Safety Foundation International, and each day, nearly seven children are treated in a hospital due to injuries from tampering with an outlet.

Read more

9:57am

Thu December 11, 2014
NPR Ed

Community College Programs Can Lead To Big Payoffs — In The Right Fields

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 8:54 pm

Dental students use practice dummies Aug. 27 in a newly renovated section of Grand Rapids Community College in Grand Rapids, Mich. Health care is one field for which a recent study found that a community college degree produced a strong financial return.
Zach Gibson MLive.com/Landov

When it comes to higher education, we've all heard the talking points: More people than ever are pursuing four-year degrees — despite skyrocketing tuition costs — because they don't have many other choices if they want to be competitive in the workforce.

Read more

5:15am

Thu December 11, 2014
Business

Should Homeowners With Solar Panels Pay To Maintain Electrical Grid?

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 12:14 pm

Solar energy panels on a roof in Marshfield, Mass.
Stephan Savoia AP

The costs of solar energy are plummeting, and now are about on par with the electricity generated at big power plants. This new reality intensifies a long-running business and regulatory battle, between the mainline electric utility companies and newer firms that provide solar systems for homeowners' rooftops. Sometimes the rivalry looks more like hardball politics than marketplace economics.

Read more

5:15am

Thu December 11, 2014
Religion

Problems With Your Boss? Try A Chat With The Office Chaplain.

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 8:13 am

Copyright 2014 KERA Unlimited. To see more, visit http://www.kera.org/.

3:54am

Thu December 11, 2014
Around the Nation

Here's Why Retailers Keep Sending You Catalogs

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 7:51 pm

The number of catalogs mailed in the U.S. peaked in 2007, according to the Direct Marketing Association. It's come down since then, but last year it reached 11.9 billion.
NPR

Many things made with paper have become relics because of computers and the Internet: the Rolodex, multivolume encyclopedias, even physical maps.

Now take a look in your mailbox or somewhere around your house. There's a good chance you'll see a shopping catalog, maybe a few of them now that it's the holiday season.

"I ignore them," says Rick Narad, a professor at California State University, Chico. "I get them in the mail sometimes, and they don't make it into the house. I walk past the recycling bin, and they go right in."

Read more

3:52am

Thu December 11, 2014
Parallels

'People Are Going To Rebel': Slow Pace Of Rebuilding Frustrates Gazans

Originally published on Thu December 11, 2014 12:31 pm

Men load bags of cement from a warehouse in Gaza. Under a complicated system meant to prevent militants from getting cement to use for tunnels, Palestinians must get approval from home inspectors to buy just one sack.
Emily Harris NPR

Angry men crowded outside the Beautiful Tower Co. for Trade and Contracting in Gaza City last week. They wanted to pay for cement, but the man at the door would let in only one person at a time.

Everyone pushing for a turn had been authorized through a complicated monitoring system endorsed by Israel, the Palestinian Authority and the United Nations to buy materials to fix war-damaged homes. The system is meant to stop militants from getting cement to use for tunnels and even requires Palestinians to get prior approval from home inspectors to buy a single sack of cement.

Read more

Pages