Business

5:03pm

Mon September 17, 2012
All Tech Considered

Singapore's Rising Tech Industry Draws Expat Innovators And Investors

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 6:39 pm

Andrew Roth is co-founder of Perx, a Singapore-based firm that uses smartphones as virtual loyalty cards.
Anthony Kuhn NPR

For the past six years in a row, the World Bank has rated the Southeast Asian city-state of Singapore as the easiest place in the world to do business. Drawn in part by this reputation, money and talent are pouring into the island nation's growing technology sector.

One of Facebook's co-founders recently renounced his American citizenship and relocated to Singapore, where he has been investing in tech startups.

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4:02pm

Mon September 17, 2012
The Two-Way

Canada Stops Its Defense Of Asbestos, As Quebec's Mines Close For Good

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:45 am

A former Asbestos plant is seen February in Thetford Mines, Quebec. Canada has ended its refusal to allow chrysotile asbestos to be added to the U.N.'s Rotterdam Convention on hazardous materials.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Canada's leaders have ended their country's longstanding resistance to asbestos being called a dangerous material under United Nations guidelines, a decision that reflects a shift in the leadership of Quebec province, home of Canada's asbestos industry.

Quebec's incoming premier, Pauline Marois, promised late in her campaign that she would shut down the region's asbestos mines for good. She says that she will use money that would have gone to restart the mines to diversify the local economy.

As Dan Karpenchuk reports for NPR's Newscast unit:

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3:44pm

Mon September 17, 2012
The Salt

Shriveled Mich. Apple Harvest Means Fewer Jobs, Tough Year Ahead

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:42 pm

A lonely Michigan apple.
Noah Adams NPR

An apple a day might keep the doctor away, but what do you do when there are no apples? It's a question western Michigan's apple growers are dealing with this season after strange weather earlier in the year decimated the state's apple cultivation.

Michigan is the third-largest apple producer in the U.S. after New York and Washington, but the state's apples will soon be in short supply. Now in the middle of harvest season, growers are picking only 10 percent to 15 percent of their normal crop.

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1:45pm

Mon September 17, 2012
The Two-Way

Makers Of the DipJar Hope That Dipping To Tip Catches On

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 6:46 am

As Americans increasingly rely on cards, not cash, to pay for small items like coffee and snacks, it's not always easy to tip the baristas and counter folks who make those transactions run smoothly. A new device called the "Dip Jar" might fix that, by allowing customers to dip a card to give $1 to the staff.

That might come as welcome news to workers behind the counter, who've seen debit and credit cards take over from cash. As a result, there's less change from which to pull a tip for the traditional jar that's often seen on counters where coffee, beer, or sandwiches are sold.

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11:34am

Mon September 17, 2012
Economy

Is The 'Fiscal Cliff' As Bad As It Sounds?

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 12:29 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, last year the Occupy Wall Street movement dominated headlines for weeks and added terms like the 99 percent to our political vocabularies. But a year after the protests started we wanted to know where the movement stands now. We're going to call writer and activist Debra Dickerson about this. She's at the heart of the anniversary protest. That's later in the program.

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8:31am

Mon September 17, 2012
The Two-Way

White House Launching Trade Complaints Against China

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:10 pm

A worker inspects auto parts at a factory in Chengdu, China. (2005 file photo.)
China Photos Getty Images

"The White House Monday will demand through a world trade panel that China stop subsidizing auto parts made for export," reports Cleveland's Plain Dealer.

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5:01am

Mon September 17, 2012
Business

White House To Launch Trade Case Against China

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A trade dispute between the U.S. and China is at the top of NPR's business news.

The United States has filed a complaint against China with the World Trade Organization. Washington charges that China subsidizes its cars and auto parts, giving it an unfair trade advantage over U.S. automakers.

This move comes as President Obama campaigns in Ohio today. Ohio is a political swing state and a place where many jobs rely on the auto industry.

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5:01am

Mon September 17, 2012
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And our last word in business today is: kicking the crack berry habit. That's what BlackBerry users at Yahoo are being encouraged to do.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And take up other addictions instead. Over the weekend, Yahoo announced it will buy employees the smartphone of their choice so long as it is not a BlackBerry. The company will however, pick up the tab with a data plan for the brand new iPhone 5 and the yet-to-be-released Windows Phone 8.

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5:01am

Mon September 17, 2012
Law

'Bernie Madoff Of The Midwest' To Plead Guilty

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Another massive financial fraud case is going to federal court on this Monday. In Iowa, the founder and CEO of Peregrine Financial Group, or PFG, is expected to plead guilty to charges that he swindled customers out of at least $100 million. NPR's David Schaper reports.

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5:01am

Mon September 17, 2012
Business

Gasoline Prices Expected To Start Dropping

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And gas prices are on the rise again - speaking of autos. Since the beginning of July, the average price for regular gasoline in the U.S. has gone up more than 50 cents, which makes the national average just under $3.90 a gallon.

Though NPR's Jeff Brady has some good news, prices are likely to go down soon.

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