Business

6:26am

Tue February 5, 2013
Business

FCC Proposes Public WiFi Network

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 1:47 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

The federal government has proposed an ambitious plan to build public WiFi networks throughout the country. The idea is to boost innovation and make the Internet cheaper and more accessible.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The Federal Communications Commission wants to do this by acquiring wireless spectrum from television broadcasters, including certain airwaves and set them aside for public use.

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3:22am

Tue February 5, 2013
U.S.

One-Way Tickets To Florida: Puerto Ricans Escape Island Woes

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 6:09 pm

Miguel Fontanez Sr., the owner and founder of Pioco's Chicken in Kissimmee, Fla., serves customers at his restaurant. He opened the restaurant 11 years ago, and it has become a hub for the area's large Puerto Rican community.
John W. Poole NPR

Puerto Rico's population is dropping. Faced with a deteriorating economy, increased poverty and a swelling crime rate, many citizens are fleeing the island for the U.S. mainland. In a four-part series, Morning Edition explores this phenomenon, and how Puerto Rico's troubles are affecting its people and other Americans in unexpected ways.

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5:55pm

Mon February 4, 2013
Business

How One Company Reinvented The Hand Dryer

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 4:52 pm

Craig McCarl dips Xlerator covers two at a time into a chrome bath. He has worked for Excel Dryer in East Longmeadow, Mass., for 31 years.
Andrea Hsu NPR

There's a lot of talk in politics about the desirability of American manufacturing and "green" jobs. President Obama talks about both often, especially wind turbines and long-lasting batteries that are made on U.S. soil.

Robert Siegel, host of All Things Considered, recently visited a Massachusetts factory that makes a product that hits those same parameters. It's arguably a force for sustainability, nearly 40 Americans assemble it, and it's an interesting case study in innovation: the high-speed hand dryer.

'We Had A Product People Hated To Use'

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2:54pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Reports: U.S. Plans To Sue S&P Over Mortgage Bonds Ratings

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 3:01 pm

A sign for Standard & Poor's rating agency stands in front of the company headquarters in New York.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

The United States and some states are planning to sue Standard & Poor's Ratings Services over what they say were the faulty ratings of mortgage bonds leading up to the 2008 financial collapse.

The Wall Street Journal broke the news citing "people familiar with the matter," and The New York York Times is pinning its reporting on S&P, which tells the newspaper it is expecting a lawsuit.

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2:36pm

Mon February 4, 2013
Planet Money

Health Care Spending In America, In Two Graphs

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Spending on health care has, of course, been rising in the U.S. for decades. Health care now accounts for 18 cents of every dollar Americans spend, up from 7 cents in 1970.

But where, exactly, is all that money going? And, for that matter, where is the money coming from to pay for all that health care? We found answers to both of these questions in this data set.

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1:46pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

'Meaningful' Ads Stood Out As Super Bowl Favorites

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 4:55 pm

Budweiser's Super Bowl spot won top favorite among many.
Budweiser YouTube

The Super Bowl XLVII TV ads told viewers they love animals, laughs and America.

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12:53pm

Mon February 4, 2013
The Two-Way

Canada Bids Its Penny Goodbye; Should The U.S.?

Canadian pennies. They're not going to be put into circulation anymore.
Fred Greenslade Reuters /Landov

Canada is changing its change.

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11:43am

Mon February 4, 2013
Planet Money

A Union Vote For Chinese Workers Who Assemble iPhones

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:12 pm

Workers at a Foxconn plant in Shenzhen, China, in 2010.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The Chinese workers who assemble iPhones, iPads and tons of other electronic devices may soon be able to elect their own union representatives, the FT reports.

Labor unions technically do exist in Chinese factories, but they're typically controlled by management and the government. So a union run by democratic vote of the workers would be a huge shift.

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11:27am

Mon February 4, 2013
The Salt

Small Farmers Aren't Cashing In With Wal-Mart

Originally published on Tue February 5, 2013 8:21 am

Wal-Mart claims that 11 percent of the produce in its stores now comes from local farms.
Abbie Fentress Swanson Harvest Public Media

When Wal-Mart calls, Herman Farris always finds whatever the retailer wants, even if it's yucca root in the dead of winter. Farris is a produce broker in Columbia, Mo., who has been buying for Wal-Mart from auctions and farms since the company began carrying fruits and vegetables in the early 1990s.

During the summer and fall, nearly everything Farris delivers is grown in Missouri. That's Wal-Mart's definition of "local" — produce grown and sold in the same state. In winter, it's a bit tougher to source locally.

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7:19am

Mon February 4, 2013
Business

Canadian Government Retires Its Penny

Originally published on Mon February 4, 2013 12:09 pm

The Canadian mint stops distributing pennies on Monday. Canada stopped making one-cent coins last year to cut costs, since each penny cost 1.6 cents to make. Most stores will round out change to the nearest five cents.

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