Business

7:07am

Mon March 10, 2014
Business

IBM Computer Creates Meals At South By SouthWest Festival

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

IBM brought a very special food truck to Austin. It is serving dishes developed by its famous supercomputer Watson. In addition to fruit, Baltic Apple Pie uses garlic, onion and pork.

5:03am

Mon March 10, 2014
Business

Identity Theft Tops Dirty Dozen List Compiled By IRS

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

The "Dirty Dozen" is not just the name of an action film from the 1960s. It's also the name of the list the IRS puts out each year documenting the most common tax scams. For the past two years, identity theft has topped the list. That's when thieves first steal someone's identity and then steal their tax refund by filing a fraudulent return.

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4:57am

Mon March 10, 2014
Economy

Signs Point To A Slowing U.S. Housing Market

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 9:59 am

After rising sharply in 2013, home prices in many areas are leveling off. An interesting and worrisome development for most Americans because their home is often their most valuable asset.

2:58am

Mon March 10, 2014
Business

Big Investors Boosting Home Prices, And Not Everyone's Pleased

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 10:20 am

ReBOUND Residential in Florida has bought multiple properties like this one, a formerly bank-owned home in Sunrise, Fla., as investment properties. The houses are now bringing steady returns as rentals.
Greg Allen NPR

It's taken several years, but in many parts of the country, home prices are nearly back to where they were at the peak. In places like Florida, where the housing recession hit hard, home prices rose last year by one-fifth or more.

A major factor in the price rise is hedge funds, private equity firms and other large investors. They've moved aggressively into the residential market over the past two years, buying tens of thousands of distressed properties, often at bargain prices.

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3:01pm

Sun March 9, 2014
The Two-Way

Detroit's William Clay Ford Dies At Age 88

William Clay Ford, seen here in 1995 on a 1903 Ford Model A, has died at age 88. He posed for a photo with Edsel Ford II (left) and his son, William Clay Ford Jr.
Ford Motor Co.

William Clay Ford, a descendant of auto industry pioneer Henry Ford and owner of the Detroit Lions, has died at age 88. He was the son of Edsel Ford.

Ford's death was confirmed by the automaker that bears his family's name Sunday. The company said Ford died at home after suffering from pneumonia. And it said that during his 57 years with the company, Ford led the Design Committee and helped develop cars such as the Continental Mark II, a sleek two-door built in the mid-1950s.

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2:36pm

Sun March 9, 2014
The Salt

A Theme Park For Foodies? Italians Say Bologna

Originally published on Tue March 11, 2014 1:53 pm

Customers dine at the original Eataly in Turin, Italy, which opened in 2007.
demoshelsinki/Flickr

Italy has more UNESCO world heritage sites than any other country in the world, and its art and cultural riches have drawn visitors for centuries.

It also prides itself on being a culinary mecca, where preparing, cooking and serving meals is a fine, even sacred, art. And now that the country is in the deepest and most protracted recession since World War II, why not cash in on its reputation as a paradise for visiting gourmets and gourmands?

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9:52am

Sun March 9, 2014
The Sunday Conversation

Rebuilding A Life And A City After Years On Detroit's Streets

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 12:00 pm

Isaac Lott has been working in deconstruction for four years. He's one of several Reclaim Detroit employees who have spent time in prison and are now starting a new life with the company.
Marvin Shaouni for NPR

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

After years of selling drugs and serving prison time in Detroit, 54-year-old Isaac Lott is now a site supervisor with the organization Reclaim Detroit. The group deconstructs abandoned homes to reclaim materials from them.

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6:40pm

Sat March 8, 2014
All Tech Considered

SXSW Diary: Aereo, The Supreme Court And TV's Future

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 12:16 am

Chet Kanojia is the founder and CEO of Aereo, which is fighting big broadcasters over its tiny antenna.
Elise Hu NPR

The crowds are so thick in Austin, Texas, that locals are using an Avoid Humans app to find some peace and quiet, and the warning at the convention center of South By Southwest Interactive goes something like this: "Only one person per escalator step OR YOU WILL BREAK IT!"

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10:16am

Sat March 8, 2014
Economy

What Germans Know Could Help Bridge U.S. Workers' Skill Gap

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

President Barack Obama promotes job training at General Electric's Waukesha, Wis., gas engine plant in January.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

Job training programs are failing to turn out enough skilled workers to fill job openings in the U.S., a phenomenon that puzzles some European companies that expand into the U.S.

President Obama freely admits that America needs to improve the way it trains workers. In a speech at a General Electric manufacturing plant in Wisconsin earlier this year, he said, "We gotta move away from what my labor secretary, Tom Perez, calls 'train and pray.' You train workers first and then you hope they get a job."

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5:20am

Sat March 8, 2014
Business

Don't Run Out For Caviar Yet, But Wages Are Heading Higher

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 12:40 pm

Construction companies added 15,000 jobs even though the weather was horrible in much of the country in February.
Sarah Glenn Getty Images
  • Freezing Weather Put A Chill On Economy, Housing Market?

Friday's monthly employment report was encouraging — but not just for job seekers. People who already have work could find something to celebrate too: Hourly wages rose at a decent pace.

That's a welcome change for employees who have seen only very, very modest raises in this economic recovery.

The Labor Department said average hourly wages rose by 9 cents an hour in February, up to $24.31. With that bump, workers are now making 2.2 percent more per hour than they were a year ago.

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