Business

6:13am

Wed February 12, 2014
Business

U.S. To Ban Commercial Trade Of Elephant Ivory

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We heard elsewhere in our program that conservation experts are meeting in London this week to try to crack down on the trade in illegal wildlife. Here in Washington, the White House announced yesterday new restrictions on the import and sale of African elephant ivory.

NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports.

ELIZABETH SHOGREN, BYLINE: Elephant ivory goes for $1,500 a pound. Rhino horn is worth its weight in gold - $45,000 a pound. Dan Ashe heads the Federal Fish and Wildlife Service.

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6:07am

Wed February 12, 2014
Business

CVS Stock Rises Ahead Of Lost Tobacco Sales

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 7:57 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Less than a week after CVS announced its decision to stop selling tobacco products, the company's stock is on the rise. Share prices were up 2.3 percent yesterday, after posting higher-than-expected quarterly profits.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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3:39am

Wed February 12, 2014
Art & Design

At Last, New York Fashion Week Brings 'Good News For Real People'

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:27 am

Needleman says The Row has created an oversized sweater and sweater-skirt "that looks like if you were to lay down, you could just wrap it over yourself like a blanket and go to sleep."
Arno Frugier The Row Fall 2014 Collection

This year, the models on the runway at New York Fashion Week look downright comfortable — and Deborah Needleman, editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, says that's "good news for real people."

In the semi-annual event, fashion editors and store buyers attend elaborate runway shows staged in tents at Lincoln Center and other locations around New York City. Designers present clothes to them that consumers may see in stores in the fall.

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9:15pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Two-Way

NBC's Tom Brokaw Announces He Has Cancer, Says He's 'Optimistic'

Tom Brokaw, seen here at an event in Silver Spring, Md., last year, was diagnosed with a form of cancer last August.
Kris Connor Getty Images

Tom Brokaw, the NBC News correspondent who for years was one of America's favorite news anchors, has been diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a cancer that affects blood cells in bone marrow, the network says.

Saying that Brokaw "and his physicians are very encouraged with the progress he is making" as he undergoes treatment, NBC released a statement on Brokaw's behalf. Here it is:

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7:38pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Two-Way

European Union Moves To Approve U.S. Genetically Modified Corn

Despite efforts by two-thirds of its 28 member states to block the move, the European Union took a large step toward approving a new genetically modified corn Tuesday. It opponents say the corn, a DuPont Pioneer product called TC1507, has harmful qualities. They also predict the decision will prove to be controversial in Europe.

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6:41pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Around the Nation

Going To College May Cost You, But So Will Skipping It

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 8:00 pm

A new study shows that the income gap between young adults who go to college and those who don't only continues to grow.
iStockphoto

In America, total student loan debt tops $1 trillion and a four-year college degree can cost as much as a house — leaving many families wondering if college is really worth the cost.

Yes, a new study of young people finds. The study, released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center, looks at income and unemployment among young adults. Paul Taylor, executive vice president of special projects at Pew, says it's pretty much case closed when it comes to the benefits of going to college.

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5:34pm

Tue February 11, 2014
U.S.

Nonprofits Pull In Investors To Tackle Housing Affordability

Originally published on Thu February 27, 2014 12:56 pm

Melissa Conklin, 23, stands in the kitchen of her two-bedroom apartment at Woodmere Trace in Norfolk, Va. She earns about $30,000 a year at a nearby car dealership, and says these apartments are not only convenient, but affordable. She pays about $900 a month here, far less than other apartments in the area.
Pam Fessler NPR

One of the biggest problems facing low-income families in the U.S. today is a lack of affordable housing.

According to a recent report by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard, more than 7 million low-income households now spend more than half of their income for rent, which leaves little money for anything else. And the situation is expected to get worse.

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5:30pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Two-Way

House Votes To Extend Debt Limit To March 2015

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 5:48 pm

The House of Representatives has voted to extend the federal debt limit, after the Republican majority abandoned its hopes to tie other provisions to the measure. By a 221-201 vote, the House voted to extend the debt limit to March 15, 2015.

Update at 5:35 p.m. ET: Ryan Reportedly Voted 'No'

In the end, 28 Republicans joined with 193 Democrats to approve the move.

On Twitter, several congressional reporters quickly noted that House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, R-Wis., was one of many Republicans who voted against the legislation.

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3:55pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Salt

After 23 Years, Your Waiter Is Ready For A Raise

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 4:21 pm

A Denny's waitress delivers breakfast to customers in Emeryville, Calif. The tipped minimum wage has been stuck at $2.13 since 1991.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

When Woody Harrelson's character got hired as a bartender on Cheers, he was so excited, he insisted on working for no more than the minimum wage. "I'd work like a slave," he said, "and, of course, I'd wash your car."

Most bar and restaurant workers would prefer to bring home a little more cash. They may be in luck.

As part of his plan to raise the minimum wage, President Obama has called for substantially increasing the base wage paid to tipped workers for the first time in decades.

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10:54am

Tue February 11, 2014
The Salt

N.Y. Immigrants Find They Can Earn Bread And Butter From Baking

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 11:31 am

Hot Bread Almacen, the retail shop of Hot Bread Kitchen, is located in the historic La Marqueta building in East Harlem, New York.
Daniel Krieger for Hot Bread Kitchen

In the heart of New York City's Spanish Harlem, women from Morocco to Mexico arrive before dawn to crank up the ovens at Hot Bread Kitchen.

Despite their different cultures and languages, this non-profit training bakery says most of its participants have one thing in common: they all grew up learning how to bake traditional breads.

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