Arts

3:28am

Tue July 3, 2012
Books

Dog Memoirs Will Fetch, Sit And Stay On Your Shelf

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 2:13 pm

Gromit is the purebred Pembroke Welsh corgi belonging to NPR's Julie Rovner — who says she's hoping to eventually adopt a companion pooch named Wallace.
Julie Rovner

The Morning Edition mailboxes are always overflowing with books sent by publishers. And recently, a fair number have fallen into a category you might call "dog memoirs" — books about how dogs transform their owners' lives.

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3:20am

Tue July 3, 2012
Author Interviews

A Cautionary Tale About Transforming Afghanistan

Originally published on Tue July 3, 2012 1:05 pm

Scores of Americans engineers worked in southern Afghanistan from the late 1940s to the late 1970s to build two large dams and a canal network. The development project soon became a vast experiment in social engineering. New villages were constructed, with schools and health clinics. A new, modern society was to rise from the desert.
Courtesy of the U.S. National Archives via Foreign Policy

The plan in Afghanistan was ambitious. Americans would set up a base in one of the most remote parts of one of the world's most isolated countries. The project would last many years and cost large sums of money. And in the end, Afghanistan, or at least one small part of it, would be a new, modern country.

When Americans think of large-scale U.S. involvement in Afghanistan, most would point to the Sept. 11 attacks that prompted the American invasion of the country in 2001.

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12:39pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Book Reviews

'The Age Of Miracles' Considers Earth's Fragility

iStock

The Age of Miracles is literary fiction, but it spins out the same kind of "what if?" disaster plot that distinguishes many a classic sci-fi movie. Too bad the title The Day the Earth Stood Still was already taken, because it really would have been the perfect title for Thompson's novel.

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12:06pm

Mon July 2, 2012
Food

Wake Up Your Vegan Meals With Indian Fare

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:40 pm

Courtesy Anupy Singla

Anupy Singla wants to spice up your vegan diet with some Indian flare.

"If you look at Indian cuisine," the food writer tells NPR's Michel Martin, "it really is one of the only cuisines that highlights vegetarian food, so it's not a far stretch."

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11:55am

Mon July 2, 2012
Arts & Life

Has The Big Day Lost Its Appeal For New Brides?

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 3:40 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Coming up, that 4th of July feast is just around the corner and many of us are hoping to load our plates with meat, but one cook is saying, why not go vegan? Anupy Singla will share her cookbook, "Vegan Indian Cooking: 140 Simple and Healthy Vegan Recipes." That's in just a few minutes.

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7:03am

Mon July 2, 2012
Book Reviews

Unicorns And Witches And Wild Mood Swings, Oh My!

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 12:11 pm

Cover Detail

Petra Mayer is an associate editor at NPR Books.

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3:33am

Mon July 2, 2012
Crime In The City

Philly Author's 'Confession': I Lived These Stories

Originally published on Thu July 5, 2012 4:49 pm

Author Solomon Jones bases his work on his own experiences on the streets of Philadelphia.
Milton Perry

Philadelphia may be called the City of Brotherly Love, but author Solomon Jones sees the sadder, more complex side of the city.

Jones' books feature Philly police detective Mike Coletti. When we meet him in The Last Confession, he's on the verge of retirement, but before he can head off into the sunset, he's got to confront some demons from his past and catch a serial killer calling himself the Angel of Death.

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3:29am

Mon July 2, 2012
The Salt

Pie-Making 101: How I Overcame My Fear Of Crumbling Crust

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 11:27 am

CIA Instructor George Higgins checks the slices of pie made by students.
Allison Aubrey NPR

If you listen to my story on Morning Edition, you'll understand the generational divide that has led to my fear of making a pie crust.

So when I decided to overcome my fear, I did it the right way. I hopped on a train to the Culinary Institute of America, the nation's premier cooking school, in Hyde Park, N.Y. There I learned the foolproof pie crust formula that chef George Higgins teaches his students. "It starts with 3, 2, 1," he explains.

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4:03pm

Sun July 1, 2012
Author Interviews

The Complex 'Tapestry' of Michelle Obama's Ancestry

Originally published on Mon July 2, 2012 10:17 am

Fraser and Marian Shields Robinson raised their children, Craig and Michelle, in Chicago, but their family's ancestry can be traced back to pre-abolition Georgia.
Barack Obama Campaign

When Michelle Obama's great-great-great grandmother was 8 years old, her life underwent a dramatic change.

Melvinia Shields was a slave who grew up at a South Carolina estate with a relatively large community of slaves she knew well. But then she was moved to a small farm in northern Georgia where she was one of only three slaves; most white people in the area didn't own any.

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7:55am

Sun July 1, 2012
Movie Interviews

Lost In 'The City Dark': Documenting Missing Stars

Peabody-winning filmmaker Ian Cheney tackles a rather intangible subject in his latest film: light pollution. Host David Greene speaks with Cheney about The City Dark and what people lose when they can no longer see the stars.

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