Arts

4:31pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Reporter's Notebook

For Liberian Youth, A Creative Outlet In Krumping

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 6:39 pm

Franklyn Dunbar, 17, practices krumping with his crew at his mother's house in Paynesville, a suburb of Monrovia, Liberia. Dunbar was born in New York, but moved to his home country of Liberia seven years ago.
Tamasin Ford NPR

2:08pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Books

How Obama, Roberts Interpret Laws In 'The Oath'

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 12:25 pm

Barack Obama is sworn in as the 44th president of the United States on Jan. 20, 2009, in Washington.
Tim Sloan Getty Images

During his 2008 presidential campaign, Barack Obama ran on the platform of "change we can believe in" — but he has a different approach to the Supreme Court's interpretation of constitutional law.

"Obama is a great believer in stability — in the absence of change — when it comes to the work of the Supreme Court," Jeffrey Toobin, author and senior legal analyst for CNN, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "He is the one trying to hold onto the older decisions, and [Chief Justice John] Roberts is the one who wants to move the court in a dramatically new direction."

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12:13pm

Mon September 17, 2012
Monkey See

The 25 Magic Words Of American Television

iStockphoto.com

Tonight, two new fall shows premiere: Mob Doctor, which is about a doctor who works for the mob, and Revolution, which is about a devastating global power outage and — more than that — a revolution.

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11:34am

Mon September 17, 2012
Food

Are You A Sellout If You Cook For Your Man?

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 12:03 pm

For generations women have been told, if you want a man, learn to cook. That's exactly why feminist writer Shayla Pierce stayed out of the kitchen. But now she finds herself with a boyfriend, learning to cook, and wondering if that makes her a sellout. She speaks with host Michel Martin about her article and her change of heart.

7:03am

Mon September 17, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Books Behaving Badly: A Tale Of Real Life In Ink

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 1:28 pm

Shani Boianjiu is the author of The People of Forever Are Not Afraid.

When I was 11, I found a book that did not know it was a book. It was a yellowing Hebrew translation of Tarjei Vesaas' Norwegian novel The Ice Palace. I found it on the shelf in my room that belonged to my parents' old books. Usually, these books were too long for me.

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3:38am

Mon September 17, 2012
Movies

Toronto Looks East With Asian Film Summit

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 9:52 am

Luminaries including Mira Nair, Guneet Monga, Shailja Gupta, Nina Lath Gupta and Dibakar Banerjee attended TIFF's Asian Film Summit Banquet to discuss the growth of a new, realist South Asian cinema.
Peter Bregg Getty Images

On Sunday, the annual Toronto International Film Festival came to a close after 11 days of screenings, meetings and, of course, parties. It's become an important place to kick off the fall film season. But this year, the festival wasn't only looking west to Hollywood — it was also sharpening its focus on the East, and the rise of new cinema from India, in particular.

One of the films at this year's Toronto festival was called Shanghai; it comes from Mumbai, and was directed by Dibakar Banerjee.

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4:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
Arts & Life

A Reminder, Three-Minute Fiction Round 9 Is Open

Originally published on Mon September 17, 2012 9:50 am

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Just a reminder now that Round 9 of our Three-Minute Fiction Contest is open. It's where we ask you to write an original short story that can be read in about three minutes, so no more than 600 words. In each round, we have a judge with a new challenge. And this time, it's novelist Brad Meltzer, and he's come up with this.

BRAD MELTZER: Your story must revolve around a U.S. president who can be fictional or real.

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4:43pm

Sun September 16, 2012
The Salt

Nordic Cuisine: Moving Beyond The Meatballs And Pickled Fish

Originally published on Tue September 18, 2012 2:42 pm

The Nordic Food Lab experiments with garum, a form of fish sauce familiar to the ancient Romans.
courtesy Nordic Food Lab

For many people, the phrase "Scandinavian food" probably doesn't bring much to mind beyond the Ikea food court. For those who do have a connection with these Northern European countries, the mental image is probably smothered in gravy with a side of potatoes. But if you're coming to Copenhagen's noma restaurant expecting the same old meatballs and pickled fish, think again.

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6:24am

Sun September 16, 2012
Books

In 'Victory Lab,' A Concoction Crafted To Move Voters

Originally published on Sun October 28, 2012 2:24 pm

iStockphoto.com

Campaigns today are collecting information that goes way beyond demographics. Data points as disparate as the catalogs you peruse or the car you drive all make up a picture that campaigns use to find common ground with their candidates — and get you to the voting booth.

Journalist Sasha Issenberg describes this data-driven world in his new book, The Victory Lab. There were two "major innovations" that spurred the modern approach to voter outreach, he tells Weekend Edition guest host Linda Wertheimer.

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6:24am

Sun September 16, 2012
Author Interviews

Doomed Love And Psychic Powers In 'Raven Boys'

Originally published on Sun September 16, 2012 9:20 am

Courtesy of Scholastic

Maggie Stiefvater is a young-adult author with a passionate fan base — she describes her subject matter as everything from "homicidal faeries" to "werewolf nookie."

She wrote the best-selling Shiver trilogy and the novel The Scorpio Races. Her most-recent book, The Raven Boys, is the first in a series of four that will follow Blue Sargent, daughter of the Henrietta, Va., town psychic, as she becomes involved with the lives of four students at the local private school who call themselves the Raven Boys.

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