Arts

6:32am

Sun October 21, 2012
Music Interviews

From Elgar To Beatles: Abbey Road Blazed A Trail

Originally published on Tue October 23, 2012 12:01 pm

The iconic cover of The Beatles' Abbey Road.
Album cover

In 1969, four moppy-haired musicians named John, Paul, George and Ringo walked single file on a London crosswalk and made one of the most iconic album covers of all time. Today, a steady stream of Beatles fans and London tourists are still eager to walk in the footsteps of the Fab Four on that famous stretch of asphalt.

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6:32am

Sun October 21, 2012
Theater

A Celebration Of Janis Joplin And All Her Swagger

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

Mary Bridget Davies as Janis Joplin and Sabrina Elayne Carten as Blues Singer in the Cleveland Play House production of One Night with Janis Joplin.
Janet Macoska Arena Stage

The countercultural revolution of the 1960s may have been all about sex drugs and rock 'n' roll, but for one young Texas singer it was all about the blues. No one sang the blues quite like Janis Joplin.

Joplin was part of a legendary line-up of musicians at Woodstock in 1969: Jimi Hendrix, The Grateful Dead, Joan Baez. She wasn't on the music scene long, though. Joplin died in 1970 of a drug overdose. She was only 27 years old, but in that short time her bluesy rasp helped define the music of a generation.

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6:32am

Sun October 21, 2012
Movie Interviews

In McElwee Doc, 'Memory' Fails And Family Clashes

Originally published on Sun November 18, 2012 7:04 am

In an attempt to remember what it was like to have most of his life ahead of him, filmmaker Ross McElwee turns the camera on his son, Adrian, seen above.
Fred Wasser

Filmmaker Ross McElwee is a one-man crew: soundman, cameraman, narrator. He reached a wide audience with his sweet documentary Sherman's March, which chronicled his journey through the South searching for love. The film won the Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival in 1987. He's made five documentary features since then.

McElwee's latest film is Photographic Memory — and it presents a different side of the director.

Early in Photographic Memory, we see McElwee in a small town in Brittany, France, in a state of digital disorientation.

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1:59am

Sun October 21, 2012
Sunday Puzzle

'Poked' And 'Tummy' Become 'Poker' And 'Rummy'

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 8:03 am

NPR Graphic

On-air challenge: You will be given two words. Change one letter in each of them to make two new words that name things that are in the same category. (Hint: In each pair, the letter that you change to — that is, the new letter — is the same in each pair.) For example, given the words "poked" and "tummy," the answer would be "poker" and "rummy."

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5:00pm

Sat October 20, 2012
From Our Listeners

Three-Minute Fiction: Check-In With The Judge

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

RAZ: For the past few weeks, we've been reading close to 4,000 stories about fictional and real presidents - stories that were submitted by you to our writing contest, Three-Minute Fiction, here on WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. That was the challenge by our judge this round, the thriller writer Brad Meltzer. Your story had to revolve around a U.S. president who could be fictional or real.

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5:00pm

Sat October 20, 2012
Movies I've Seen A Million Times

The Movie Susan Sarandon Has 'Seen A Million Times'

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 10:12 am

Actors (from left) Dorris Bowdon, Jane Darwell and Henry Fonda in a still from the 1940 film The Grapes of Wrath, directed by John Ford.
20th Century Fox Getty Images

The weekends on All Things Considered series Movies I've Seen A Million Times features filmmakers, actors, writers and directors talking about the movies that they never get tired of watching.

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7:03am

Sat October 20, 2012
Essays

Anxiety Ahoy: Amazon Now Ranks Author Popularity

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 3:10 pm

Toby Talbot AP

What is the point of the best-seller list? Depends who you are. If you're a reader, it's a guide to what's popular — what's new, what your neighbors are buying, and what you might like to read next. If you're a publisher, it's a source of feedback and a sales tool: It tells you how your books compete, and gives you triumphs to crow about on paperback covers.

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6:37am

Sat October 20, 2012
Author Interviews

'John Lennon Letters' Reveal A Life As It Happened

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 4:21 pm

John Lennon signs autographs during the filming of The Magical Mystery Tour.
Jim Gray Hulton Archive/Getty Images

John Lennon loved word play; he wrote songs that have not only become standards, but also milestones, like "Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds" and "Strawberry Fields," which he wrote with the Beatles, and "Imagine" and "Give Peace a Chance," which he wrote on his own. For most of his life, he also composed letters to friends and family; then lovers, as he grew up; and strangers, as he grew famous. His notes, letters and postcards often contained small, funny drawings and self portraits.

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6:37am

Sat October 20, 2012
Movies

A Look At 'The Girl' Who Caught Hitchcock's Eye

Originally published on Thu October 25, 2012 9:24 am

Tippi Hedren (played by Sienna Millier) starred in two of Alfred Hitchcock's (Toby Jones) films: Marnie and The Birds.
Kelly Walsh HBO

6:37am

Sat October 20, 2012
Arts & Life

Examining The Economy Of Art Thieves

Originally published on Mon October 22, 2012 4:21 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

There was a huge art heist this week. Paintings by Gauguin, Matisse, Picasso, Monet and other artists were stolen from an exhibition hall in Rotterdam. Picasso's "Harlequin Head" and Monet's "Waterloo Bridge" were among the purloined works. And their loss is estimated to be worth tens of millions of dollars.

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