Arts

12:40pm

Thu November 8, 2012
Monkey See

The Love You Save: Lessons On Water And Stuff

This is the poster from my mom. As you can see, I was very into writing about reality shows.
Linda Holmes

On Monday morning at about 5:30 (I'm an early riser), I woke up, swung my legs out of bed, and stepped into water.

I live in a basement apartment where I've been for four years, and almost exactly a week after I was blessedly lucky to avoid the superstorm — and at a time when some of my New York and New Jersey friends were still in the dark — a freaky plumbing/heating mishap wound up filling my entire apartment with about an inch of water.

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7:03am

Thu November 8, 2012
Book Reviews

Going 'Marbles': From Manic Highs To Oceanic Lows

Gotham

Marbles, cartoonist Ellen Forney's excellent graphic memoir about being bipolar, opens with her in the middle of a 5 1/2-hour session in a tattoo parlor. Every time the needle traces a line, Forney writes, she can "see the sensation — a bright white light, an electrical charge." Those opening words are a perfect description of her book. From the very first page, Forney allows us to see sensation — to inhabit, as closely as possible, her bipolar world, from its manic, exhilarating highs to its oceanic, debilitating lows.

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3:04pm

Wed November 7, 2012
Author Interviews

Ornstein: Could A Second Term Mean More Gridlock?

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 1:00 pm

Basic Books

President Obama has been re-elected. Democrats and Republicans have maintained their respective majorities in the Senate and in the House. So does this mean there will be more partisan gridlock?

Norm Ornstein, a writer for Roll Call and a resident scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that it's a mixed message.

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1:37pm

Wed November 7, 2012
The Salt

Meet 4 African Women Who Are Changing The Face Of Coffee

Originally published on Thu November 15, 2012 3:39 pm

Fatima Aziz Faraji is one of four women who is at the forefront of empowering women in the coffee sector.
Karen Castillo Farfán NPR

If you're a coffee drinker, chances are the cup of java you drank this morning was made from beans that were produced or harvested by women. Women's handprints can be found at every point in coffee production.

In fact, on family-owned coffee farms in Africa, about 70 percent of maintenance and harvesting work is done by women, according to an analysis by the International Trade Centre, but only rarely do women own the land or have financial control.

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7:03am

Wed November 7, 2012
PG-13: Risky Reads

Reading 'Dune,' My Junior-High Survival Guide

Originally published on Wed November 21, 2012 12:10 pm

cover promo

Leigh Bardugo is the author of Shadow and Bone.

Frank Herbert's Dune was the first coming-of-age story that resonated with me: drugs, destiny, messiah complexes — it had everything. But what really shook me was its scale. At age 12, my life was the tiny, miserable cycle of home, school and the mall. Dune cracked it all open. There was a hell of a good universe next door, several in fact, and that made my little world a lot more bearable.

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1:25pm

Tue November 6, 2012
Author Interviews

Oliver Sacks, Exploring How Hallucinations Happen

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 12:58 pm

Oliver Sacks is a physician, author and professor of neurology at NYU School of Medicine. He also frequently contributes to The New Yorker.
Elena Seibert Knopf

In Oliver Sacks' book The Mind's Eye, the neurologist included an interesting footnote in a chapter about losing vision in one eye because of cancer that said: "In the '60s, during a period of experimenting with large doses of amphetamines, I experienced a different sort of vivid mental imagery."

He expands on this footnote in his new book, Hallucinations, where he writes about various types of hallucinations — visions triggered by grief, brain injury, migraines, medications and neurological disorders.

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7:03am

Tue November 6, 2012
Book Reviews

'Flight Behavior' Weds Issues To A Butterfly Narrative

Luis Acosta AFP/Getty Images

Barbara Kingsolver's commitment to literature promoting social justice runs so deep that in 1998 she established the Bellwether Prize (now the PEN/Bellwether Prize for Socially Engaged Fiction) to encourage it.

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4:36pm

Mon November 5, 2012
Movies

Lincoln's Screen Legacy, Decidedly Larger Than Life

Originally published on Mon November 5, 2012 5:49 pm

Lincoln's life has been adapted for the screen so often that there's room for the artistic liberties of films like Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter.
Twentieth Century Fox

He's a statue in many a monument, a profile on the penny, a face on the $5 bill, and an animatronic robot at Disneyland. He's even carved into a mountain in South Dakota. So, of course, Abe Lincoln has been a character in the movies — more than 300 of them, in fact.

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3:17pm

Mon November 5, 2012
The Salt

Sandwich Monday: The Angry Whopper

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 3:26 pm

Angry Whopper, Angry Peter.
NPR

Burger King's Angry Whopper is a burger with bacon, jalapenos and something called Angry Onions, topped with something called Angry Sauce. It's got the best name of the three new items on the BK menu now appearing "for a limited time" to celebrate the Whopper's 55th Anniversary.

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3:11pm

Mon November 5, 2012
Author Interviews

An 'Oddly Normal' Outcome For A Singular Child

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 12:59 pm

Courtesy of Gotham

John Schwartz and Jeanne Mixon first suspected that their son, Joe, was gay when he was 3 years old — and they wanted to be as supportive and helpful as they could.

"As parents you love kids," Schwartz tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "As parents, you want your kid to be happy."

Schwartz and Mixon drew on the experiences they had raising their other two children and by asking their gay friends about the best way to talk to Joe about his sexuality.

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