Arts

5:03pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Movie Reviews

Building A Home For A Client Who Can't Live In It

Artist Jackie Sumell set out to build a dream home for bank robber Herman Wallace, whose additional conviction for killing a prison guard is the subject of a long-running dispute.
First Run Features

The off-screen protagonist of Herman's House, Herman Wallace, already has a dwelling for his body: a 6-foot-by-8-foot cell at the Louisiana State Penitentiary, aka Angola. But the documentary's on-screen protagonist, Jackie Sumell, wants him also to have a place for his soul: a dream house for a man who desperately needs dreams.

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2:41pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Education

In D.C., Art Program Turns Boys' Lives Into 'Masterpieces'

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 10:26 pm

Life Pieces to Masterpieces is an arts program that serves the neighborhood of Ward 7 in Washington, D.C. Boys work with mentors to create works of art.
Lizzie Chen NPR

This is the third in a three-part series about the intersection of education and the arts.

Life Pieces to Masterpieces is an arts program that's not entirely about the art. It's an after-school program based in a struggling neighborhood in Washington, D.C., that teaches black boys and young men what they call "the four C's": "Connect, create, contribute, celebrate." From ages 3-25, they learn to express themselves by conceiving their paintings together. And those paintings will often reflect what's going on in their lives.

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12:57pm

Thu April 18, 2013
Monkey See

Missed Sundance? Can't Do Cannes? Try Tribeca

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 1:33 pm

Richard Linklater's Before Midnight is one of many high-profile films set to be shown at this week's Tribeca Film Festival in New York City. (Pictured: Ethan Hawke as Jesse and Julie Delpy as Celine)
Sony Pictures Classics

This week, the Tribeca Film Festival kicks off its 12th year. With a shorter history than Sundance or Cannes — the two major festivals that flank it on the calendar — Tribeca has grown in fits and starts since its 2002 launch as an effort to revitalize Lower Manhattan in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 attacks.

Today, Tribeca has carved out an identity as an international festival supporting both established and first-time filmmakers — and, not coincidentally, showcasing New York as a filmmaking hub.

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11:52am

Thu April 18, 2013
Arts & Life

Tell Me More Wants Your Poetry!

Listeners are invited to submit short poems on Twitter to celebrate National Poetry Month. Curator and poet Holly Bass gives an update on recent tweets about tragedy in Boston, and other topics.

11:52am

Thu April 18, 2013
Around the Nation

Angela Davis Film Explores The 'Terrorist' And Scholar

Angela Davis was once on the FBI's most wanted list. But decades after her brush with the law as a political activist, she remains a hero to some, and a villain to others. Host Michel Martin talks with Shola Lynch, the director of the new documentary Free Angela and All Political Prisoners.

11:52am

Thu April 18, 2013
Arts & Life

'Portrait Of Jason': '60s Counterculture Restored

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 12:03 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we want to tell you about a remarkable film, one that the renowned director Ingmar Bergman called extraordinary. But it's a film that most people have never seen because, for decades, it was believed to have been lost.

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11:51am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Salt

From Vine To Pen: There's More Than One Way Wine Fuels Writing

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 3:20 pm

Ernest Hemingway once said, "A man does not exist until he is drunk."
AP

Sure, we all know alcohol has fueled plenty a writing session. William Faulkner — who once said, "civilization begins with distillation" — was known to have kept a bottle by his side while he typed away throughout his writing career.

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11:47am

Thu April 18, 2013
Movie Interviews

Sebastian Junger: 'Which Way' To Turn After Hetherington's Death

Originally published on Thu April 18, 2013 11:53 am

Photographer Tim Hetherington during an assignment for Vanity Fair Magazine at the Restrepo outpost.
Tim A. Hetherington

War photographer Tim Hetherington said he thought war was wired into young men. And he risked, and ultimately gave, his life to capture these young men in photographs and video — in Liberia, Sierra Leone, Afghanistan and other war zones. Hetherington was killed by shrapnel from a mortar round while taking pictures in Libya in 2011, during the uprising against President Moammar Gadhafi.

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9:37am

Thu April 18, 2013
Monkey See

Entirely Real Photos: Our Creepy Wax Museum Series Continues With One Direction

Fans pose for pictures with waxwork models of English-Irish boy band 'One Direction' at Madame Tussauds in London this week.
Carl Court AFP/Getty Images

I can't really explain why I think wax museum pictures are so funny, but clearly, I do. And I do again.

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7:19am

Thu April 18, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Vast 'Digital Public Library Of America' Opens Today

Encyclopedia Britannica editions are seen at the New York Public Library on March 14, 2012 in New York City.
Mario Tama Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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