Arts

7:30am

Thu September 5, 2013
The Two-Way

Book News: Did A Missing Testicle Make J.D. Salinger A Recluse?

A photo of J.D. Salinger taken in September 1961.
AP

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:03am

Thu September 5, 2013
Author Interviews

We're All Completely Alone: A Chat With Novelist Kevin Maher

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 3:15 pm

iStockphoto.com

A father's illness, a girlfriend's mental breakdown and abuse by a priest, all set against a background of class conflict and nationalist tensions: Jim, the 14-year-old protagonist of The Fields, faces catastrophe after catastrophe. But Kevin Maher's debut novel is hardly dour. Instead, the jokes — simultaneously funny and brave — never stop coming.

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3:25am

Thu September 5, 2013
Author Interviews

'Winter's Bone' Author Revisits A Tragedy In His Ozarks Hometown

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 6:42 pm

Daniel Woodrell's novel Winter's Bone -- a dark family saga set in the Ozarks — was adapted into a film in 2010. Woodrell returned to his hometown of West Plains, Mo., about 20 years ago and has been writing there ever since.
Alexander Klein AFP/Getty Images

The Ozarks mountain town of West Plains, Mo., is the kind of town where a person can stand in his front yard and have a comfortable view of his past.

"My mom was actually born about 150 or 200 feet that way, and my grandfather's house is I guess 200 yards that way," says Daniel Woodrell, author of Winter's Bone, and most recently, The Maid's Version.

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3:25am

Thu September 5, 2013
Around the Nation

Forget Twitter. In St. Louis, Bare Your Soul Via Typewriter

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 8:10 pm

Goldkamp also keeps an index card file of choice words to integrate into his poem when he has trouble finding the right words.
Erin Williams STL Public Radio

Typically, 21st century writers fall into two technical categories: Mac or PC. But poet Henry Goldkamp would much rather use a typewriter. He's the sole owner of a mobile poetry business, and for the past three years, he's spent his weekends traveling St. Louis, banging out short poems, on the spot, for anyone who stops by his table.

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5:05pm

Wed September 4, 2013
The Salt

A Farm-To-Table Delicacy From Spain: Roasted Baby Pig

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 6:52 pm

Roel Basalm Alim, a cook at Restaurante Botín, displays a plate of cochinillo asado, or roast suckling pig.
Lauren Frayer/NPR

On the windswept plateau where Madrid is perched, it's too dry to raise cattle and most crops. So pork has long been a mainstay, from jamón ibérico and charcuterie tapas to stews of pigs' ears and entrails.

But when locals want a really special treat, they go for an entire piglet roasted whole — head, hooves and all — on an oak wood fire.

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4:49pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Ask Me Another

Mind In The Guttural

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:25 am

Get ready to give your mind and your mouth a workout. In this game led by host Ophira Eisenberg, all the answers have a guttural "ch" sound in them. For instance, the painter that had an eye for sunflowers but cut off his left earlobe is Vincent Van Gogh.

Plus, Jonathan Coulton concludes the game with a version of The Beatles' "Help!" that is also quite guttural.

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4:49pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Ask Me Another

All In The Cards

Originally published on Sun May 4, 2014 10:24 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

We've got our next two contestants - Melissa Kawlanaski and Lisa Richter.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Melissa, what is your card game of choice?

MELISSA KALWANASKI: Poker, I guess.

EISENBERG: Poker is a good one. Yeah, I like that. You play a little poker?

KALWANASKI: I won a small tournament once.

EISENBERG: Really? How small?

KALWANASKI: Like 20 people.

EISENBERG: What did you win?

KALWANASKI: Two hundred dollars.

EISENBERG: That's real money.

KALWANASKI: Yeah.

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4:49pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Ask Me Another

Mister-y Men

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:25 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Now we're going to crown this week's grand champion. Let's bring back from Mind in the Gutteral Scott Bergeron; from All in the Cards, Melissa Kalwanaski; from Charming Old Moviehouse Justin Sheen; from I Am Not the Walrus, Jonathan Firestone; and from Down With O.P.P, Stacey Molski.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: I'm going to ask our puzzle guru Art Chung to take us out.

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4:49pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Ask Me Another

Down With 'O.P.P.'

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 10:25 am

Transcript

OPHIRA EISENBERG, HOST:

Up next are contestants Stacey Molski and Dan Welch.

(APPLAUSE)

EISENBERG: Well, hello, Dan, Stacey. Dan, are you a trivia player?

DAN WELCH: Occasionally. Yes.

EISENBERG: Do you have a specialty?

WELCH: A little bit of everything, I hope.

EISENBERG: A little bit of everything. OK. That's good. That's going to help you. Stacey?

STACEY MOLSKI: Same.

EISENBERG: Little bit of everything?

MOLSKI: Yeah, a little bit of everything.

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1:30pm

Wed September 4, 2013
Book Reviews

From McDermott, An Extraordinary Story Of An Ordinary 'Someone'

Originally published on Wed September 4, 2013 3:27 pm

The main character of Alice McDermott's Someone grew up in 1920s and '30s New York.
Hulton Archive Getty Images

Endurance, going the distance, sucking up the solitude and the brine: I'm not talking about the glorious Diana Nyad and her instantly historic swim from Cuba to Key West, but of the ordinary heroine whose life is the subject of Alice McDermott's latest novel, Someone. "Ordinary" is a word that's used a lot to describe McDermott's characters, mostly Irish and working class, mostly un-heroic in any splashy way.

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