Arts

6:36pm

Tue January 21, 2014
Fine Art

Which Artworks Should We Save? Cash-Strapped Italy Lets Citizens Vote

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 10:37 am

In a program called L'Arte Auita L'Arte (Art Helping Art) Italy's Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism posted works of art in need of restoration on Facebook. The public was asked to vote for the art it felt was most deserving of a fix-up.
Ministry of Heritage and Culture and Tourism via Facebook

When it comes to Italy's enormous art heritage, officials are often faced with an unbearable choice: Which pieces should be saved when the government can't afford to save them all? Now, thanks to an online vote, it's up to Italian citizens to answer that tough question. In the end, some art will get a new lease on life, but many works that epitomize Western civilization remain seriously in danger.

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2:05pm

Tue January 21, 2014
Monkey See

As NBC Prepares For A Late-Night Transition, Everyone Is On Message (So Far)

Producer Josh Lieb (L) and host Jimmy Fallon talk to critics on Sunday about what's to come.
Frederick M. Brown Getty Images

It felt like a rerun from a long-ago time, with a twist.

Once again, an NBC executive was facing a crowd of TV critic and reporters, saying nice things about Jay Leno just as he was leaving as host of The Tonight Show.

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1:11pm

Tue January 21, 2014
Movie Interviews

Phoenix To Self: 'Why Am I Talking About This? ... Joaquin, Shut Up'

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:56 pm

Joaquin Phoenix's Her character, Theodore, has a job writing intimate — and sometimes erotic — cards and letters on behalf of other people.
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Joaquin Phoenix started his acting career in 1982, when he was about 8, on an episode of the TV series Seven Brides For Seven Brothers. (His brother, the late River Phoenix, was a regular in the series.) He tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross that he still vividly remembers his first time on a set.

"I remember feeling like I was buzzing, like my whole body was vibrating, because it was just so exciting to experience this thing that wasn't real but at moments felt like it was real," he says. "It's basically the feeling that I've been chasing ever since."

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9:46am

Tue January 21, 2014
The Salt

Soba: More Than Just Noodles, It's A Cultural Heritage ... And An Art Form

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 12:10 pm

Genuine soba noodles are difficult to find in the U.S.
iStockphoto

Traditional Japanese cuisine, known as washoku, is now an intangible cultural heritage, according to the United Nations.

Tofu, mochi and miso are a few examples, but it's the buckwheat noodle, or soba, that many consider the humble jewel of Japanese cuisine. It's not easy to find in the U.S., but one Los Angeles woman is helping preserve the craft of making soba.

In a cooking classroom off a busy street in L.A., Sonoko Sakai is teaching about the simplicity of making buckwheat noodles.

"Basically, soba is only two things: flour and water," Sakai explains.

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7:15am

Tue January 21, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Billy Collins' Papers Sold To The University Of Texas

Poet Billy Collins is pictured in February 2013 in New York City.
Slaven Vlasic Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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7:02am

Tue January 21, 2014
Book Reviews

Here, Kitty, Kitty: Even Dog Lovers Should Read 'The Guest Cat'

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 11:06 am

The best novels are often the ones that change us. They speak to a void, sometimes quietly, other times loudly from the proverbial rooftop. When done right, they bring to the surface important questions and compel us to look inward. Over time, they stay with us — like small miracles.

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7:02am

Tue January 21, 2014
First Reads

Exclusive First Read (And Listen!): B.J. Novak's 'One More Thing'

Originally published on Tue January 21, 2014 12:23 pm

B.J. Novak is a writer and actor best known for his work on NBC's Emmy Award-winning comedy series The Office. One More Thing: Stories and Other Stories is his first collection.
Jennifer Rocholl

You may recognize the name B.J. Novak from the credit sequence of The Office — he was a writer and executive producer. He also played the entertainingly amoral Ryan Howard. Now, Novak is expanding his scope beyond the walls of Dunder Mifflin and taking on a range of human experience in this quirky new story collection, which ranges from linked vignettes to two-line miniplays about carrot cake.

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4:55pm

Mon January 20, 2014
Author Interviews

For World Superpowers, The Negotiating Table Often Had A Net

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 7:44 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

In the spring of 1971, two global antagonists found a diplomatic opening through an unlikely source, the game of ping-pong.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED NEWSCASTS)

UNIDENTIFIED MAN #1: Good evening. The bamboo curtain has been cracked by a ping-pong ball.

MIKE WALLACE: China lifted the bamboo curtain today, long enough to let in 15 American ping-pong players.

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4:55pm

Mon January 20, 2014
Book Reviews

Book Review: 'Starting Over,' By Elizabeth Spencer

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 7:44 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

The Mississippi-born novelist and storywriter Elizabeth Spencer turned 92 last summer. Best known for her novella turned musical drama "The Light in the Piazza," Spencer has just published her 15th work of fiction. It's a collection of stories set in the South called "Starting Over." And we have a review from Alan Cheuse.

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4:55pm

Mon January 20, 2014
Movie Interviews

'The Hunt' Turns 'Enormous Love' To Fear, Hate

Originally published on Mon January 20, 2014 7:44 pm

Mads Mikkelsen plays Lucas, a schoolteacher accused of sexual abuse, in Thomas Vinterberg's latest film, The Hunt.
Magnolia

Nominations are in for this year's Academy Awards, and among those up for Best Foreign Language film is The Hunt. It's the latest from Danish director Thomas Vinterberg, who made his reputation in 1998 with The Celebration, which won the Jury Prize at Cannes and went on to become an international success. Both that film and this more recent one depict the aftermath of allegations of sexual abuse.

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