Arts

10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Happy Geek Colors

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 4:28 pm

Potter and designer Jonathan Adler takes to the puzzle podium for his Ask Me Another challenge.
Josh Rogosin NPR

Host Ophira Eisenberg puts designer Jonathan Adler in the puzzle hot seat for a quiz all about how certain colors got their name. Does the guy who coined the word "chambeige" know which color is named after a desert-dwelling animal that also gives its hair to make overcoats? Find out.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Homophones To Phone Home About

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 4:28 pm

What would you call a type of neck-wear worn while participating in a form of exercise founded by Billy Blanks? A "Tae Bo-bow tie"! In this game, host Ophira Eisenberg offers clues to phrases or compound words that change meaning when the words are reversed.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Wait, Wait...Don't Tell Me What To Do

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 4:28 pm

Unfortunately, you won't be able to duet with Carl Kasell in this game. But we encourage you to sing along and identify songs with the word "don't" in the title, as performed by house musician Jonathan Coulton. For starters, we're pretty sure that Andrew Lloyd Webber song is not called "Don't Drink That Blue Margarita."

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10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Random Questions With: Jonathan Adler

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 4:28 pm

Jonathan Adler in New York City.
Joshua McHugh

Designer Jonathan Adler's colorful, eye-popping pillows, rugs and vases adorn the interiors of many discerning homeowners, but his dream of creating a home furnishings empire was nearly deferred. Early in his career, discouragement from his pottery teacher at the Rhode Island School of Design and several unfulfilling jobs at talent agencies in New York City left Adler at his wit's end. But these events only fueled his fire to live out the pottery dream. Adler taught night classes at a pottery studio called Mud, Sweat & Tears (potter puns!) and eventually opened his own studio.

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10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Indigenous Diligence

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 4:28 pm

If Neapolitans are people from Naples, where do Sconnies come from? This game, led by house musician Jonathan Coulton, is all about demonyms — words that describe a person who hails from a particular geographic location.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

10:49am

Thu January 9, 2014
Ask Me Another

Brevity Is The Soul Of Wit

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 12:48 pm

In keeping with the title of this game, we'll keep this explanation short. All the answers in this game will be two-letter words. That's it!

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:06am

Thu January 9, 2014
The Two-Way

Book News: Cache Of Letters From 'Frankenstein' Author Found

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 7:40 am

An image of author Mary Shelley, circa 1830.
Hulton Archive/Getty Images

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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4:30am

Thu January 9, 2014
Author Interviews

A Former Child Soldier Imagines 'Tomorrow' In Sierra Leone

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:21 am

Orphaned by the civil war in Sierra Leone, Ishmael Beah told his own story in A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier. Radiance of Tomorrow is his first novel.
John Madere Sarah Crichton Books/Farrar, Straus and Giroux,

Ishmael Beah was just barely a teenager when his town became engulfed in Sierra Leone's civil war in the mid-1990s. In his 2007 memoir, A Long Way Gone, Beah describes how, after he lost his parents and brothers to the conflict, he wandered the countryside with a band of boys and was recruited as a child soldier by government forces. The memoir describes the hellish atrocities committed by child soldiers on both sides of the conflict.

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3:37am

Thu January 9, 2014
Europe

No Rain On His Parade: Parisian Preserves Art Of Umbrella Repair

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:21 am

An estimated 15 million umbrellas are thrown away in France each year. Thierry Millet is trying to change that, one umbrella repair at a time.
Lejeune Maxppp /Landov

When an umbrella breaks, most people just throw it away — and pick up another one, from a street vendor or maybe a drugstore.

But what if you got it repaired instead? Would you even be able to find someone who could do the work?

In Paris, it's still possible, but just barely. What was once a thriving profession has dwindled dramatically. These days, Thierry Millet, 58, says he is the city's last umbrella repairman.

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7:08pm

Wed January 8, 2014
Author Interviews

In An Age Of Slavery, Two Women Fight For Their 'Wings'

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 10:29 pm

iStockphoto

Sue Monk Kidd's new novel is a story told by two women whose lives are wrapped together — beginning, against their wills, when they're young girls. One is a slave; the other, her reluctant owner. One strives her whole life to be free; the other rebels against her slave-owning family and becomes a prominent abolitionist and early advocate for women's rights.

The book, The Invention of Wings, takes on both slavery and feminism — and it's inspired by the life of a real historical figure.

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