Arts

3:39am

Wed February 12, 2014
Art & Design

At Last, New York Fashion Week Brings 'Good News For Real People'

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 9:27 am

Needleman says The Row has created an oversized sweater and sweater-skirt "that looks like if you were to lay down, you could just wrap it over yourself like a blanket and go to sleep."
Arno Frugier The Row Fall 2014 Collection

This year, the models on the runway at New York Fashion Week look downright comfortable — and Deborah Needleman, editor in chief of T: The New York Times Style Magazine, says that's "good news for real people."

In the semi-annual event, fashion editors and store buyers attend elaborate runway shows staged in tents at Lincoln Center and other locations around New York City. Designers present clothes to them that consumers may see in stores in the fall.

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3:36am

Wed February 12, 2014
The Picture Show

In Photos: Moroccan Motorcycle Mashup

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 10:00 am

"Kesh Angels"
Hassan Hajjaj Courtesy of Taymour Grahne Gallery, New York

In the 1990s, Hassan Hajjaj assisted on a magazine photo shoot in Marrakesh when he had a realization: All the models, the photographer and even the clothes were from another country. Morocco, the country he grew up in, was simply the backdrop.

"From then I said it'd be great to present my people in their environment in their kind of way of dressing," he says in an interview on NPR's Morning Edition, "and play with it in that fashion way."

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7:11pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Salt

Thank You, Shirley Temple, For The Original 'Mocktail'

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 8:38 pm

A Classic Shirley Temple
iStockphoto

Generations of little girls have watched the ebullient Shirley Temple light up Depression-era black and white films, her glossy curls bouncing and her voice chirping. Generations, too, developed a taste for the Shirley Temple drink — traditionally, ginger ale with a dash of grenadine, maraschino cherry and lemon for garnish.

The drink, it seems, has a shelf life as long as her movies.

That's because the saccharine beverage in a girly pinkish hue has long embodied glamour in a glass for tweens and the younger set.

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3:55pm

Tue February 11, 2014
The Salt

After 23 Years, Your Waiter Is Ready For A Raise

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 4:21 pm

A Denny's waitress delivers breakfast to customers in Emeryville, Calif. The tipped minimum wage has been stuck at $2.13 since 1991.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

When Woody Harrelson's character got hired as a bartender on Cheers, he was so excited, he insisted on working for no more than the minimum wage. "I'd work like a slave," he said, "and, of course, I'd wash your car."

Most bar and restaurant workers would prefer to bring home a little more cash. They may be in luck.

As part of his plan to raise the minimum wage, President Obama has called for substantially increasing the base wage paid to tipped workers for the first time in decades.

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2:41pm

Tue February 11, 2014
Author Interviews

Practicing 'Extreme Medicine,' From Deep Sea To Outer Space

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 12:39 pm

Most of us have never been submerged under more than a few feet underwater. But just a few meters down, the water compresses the tissues of your body so that you become more dense. At that point, "You're more likely to sink than float," says Dr. Kevin Fong.
iStockphoto.com

Dr. Kevin Fong works on "the edges" of medicine — researching how humans survive extremes of heat, cold, trauma, outer space and deep sea. "We're still exploring the human body and what medicine can do in the same way that the great explorers of the 20th century and every age before them explored the world," he tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross.

In his book Extreme Medicine, Fong describes how avant garde medicine is challenging our understanding of how our bodies work and the boundary between life and death.

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11:57am

Tue February 11, 2014
Music

Nigerian-American Writer Teju Cole Shares His Personal Playlist

Originally published on Wed February 26, 2014 2:45 pm

Courtesy of Teju Cole

Nigerian-American writer Teju Cole's fans and followers — especially on Twitter — are scattered across the globe.

For Tell Me More's "In Your Ear" series, he shares the music that's a part of his world.

"Lately I've been listening a lot to Nigerian dance music," he says about Naeto C's 5 & 6. "Nigerian pop music is very, very big in Lagos right now."

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10:03am

Tue February 11, 2014
Monkey See

Bob And Linda Read Internet Movie Reviews, Part 3: 'Wolf Of Wall Street'

Originally published on Tue February 25, 2014 5:37 pm

8:34am

Tue February 11, 2014
The Salt

How Caffeinated Are Our Kids? Coffee Consumption Jumps

According to the pediatrics study, about three-fourths of children in the U.S. consume caffeine on a given day.
iStockphoto

Energy drinks tend to get a bad rap. The Food and Drug Administration has investigated reports of deaths and sicknesses linked to them. Hospitals have reported increased ER visits.

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7:03am

Tue February 11, 2014
Book Reviews

'One More Thing' Has A Few Too Many Things, But It's Still Funny

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 11:25 am

Dimitrios Kambouris Getty Images

How entertaining is B.J. Novak? With One More Thing, the standup comic, scriptwriter and actor (best known for his work on The Office), takes his talents to the page in 64 fresh, short, offbeat and often hilarious stories, many of which involve updating classics for satirical effect — whether with a rematch between the tortoise and the hare, or by replacing detective Encyclopedia Brown from children's literature with Wikipedia Brown, who is hopelessly distracted by tangential subjects.

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7:03am

Tue February 11, 2014
First Reads

Exclusive First Read: 'Young Money' By Kevin Roose

Originally published on Tue February 11, 2014 2:21 pm

Most people who follow the headlines are aware of the lifestyles of Wall Street's titans — and the vast bonuses that fund those lives of luxury. Kevin Roose's new Young Money looks at the bottom of that ladder: the college kids who arrived on Wall Street after the economic crash of 2008, prepared to put their noses to the grindstone in the hopes of making it big — or just making a decent living.

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