Arts

5:21am

Sun July 19, 2015
Book Reviews

Savor The Quiet Sweetness Of 'The Blue Girl'

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 8:09 pm

In her debut novel Ex Utero, Laurie Foos tells the story of a woman who misplaces her uterus at a shopping mall, "somewhere between the shoe store and the lingerie counter." After her womb goes missing her husband feels utterly lost, and others are quick to deem her careless. While fantastical on the surface, it's also a striking commentary on the nature of feminism, desire and society's obsession with presumed gender roles.

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5:15am

Sun July 19, 2015
Around the Nation

Big News: Tiny Parks Coming Soon To A Parking Spot Near You

The parklet on K Street Northwest in Washington, D.C., opened officially on July 14. It's the first parklet of its kind in the city.
Lydia Thompson NPR

Walking down K Street Northwest in Washington, D.C., almost everything is a shade of gray — light gray buildings, darker gray sidewalks, even the windows on the gray high-rises reflect their gray surroundings.

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5:48pm

Sat July 18, 2015
Environment

Birds, Bees And The Power Of Sex Appeal: The Ribald Lives Of Flowers

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 6:33 pm

Stephen Buchmann Scribner

Flowers, bugs and bees: Stephen Buchmann wanted to study them all when he was a kid.

"I never grew out of my bug-and-dinosaur phase," he tells NPR's Arun Rath. "You know, since about the third grade, I decided I wanted to chase insects, especially bees."

These days, he's living that dream. As a pollination ecologist, he's now taking a particular interest in how flowers attract insects. In his new book, The Reason for Flowers, he looks at more than just the biology of flowers — he dives into the ways they've laid down roots in human history and culture, too.

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5:10pm

Sat July 18, 2015
My Big Break

Amid Devastation, Tig Notaro Searched For A Sense Of Humor

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 11:41 pm

As part of a series called My Big Break, All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Like all great comedians, Tig Notaro started out small: at open mic nights in coffee shops and one-nighters in Holiday Inn lounges.

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10:03am

Sat July 18, 2015
Book Reviews

The Waters Of 'Lagoon' Are Choppy But Enthralling

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 2:38 pm

Courtesy of Saga Press

A singer, a soldier, and a scientist walk onto Bar Beach.

In many ways, Bar Beach was a perfect sample of Nigerian society. It was a place of mixing. The ocean mixed with the land and the wealthy mixed with the poor. Bar Beach attracted drug dealers, squatters, various accents and languages, seagulls, garbage, biting flies, tourists, all kinds of religious zealots, hawkers, prostitutes, johns, water-loving children and their careless parents.

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8:01am

Sat July 18, 2015
Book News & Features

In Monroeville, Ala., The Shock And Disillusion Of 'Watchman'

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:33 am

Copyright 2015 Troy State Public Radio. To see more, visit www.troypublicradio.org.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:44am

Sat July 18, 2015
Author Interviews

Contriving Characters From Celebrity Culture For 'Lizzie Pepper'

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:33 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:44am

Sat July 18, 2015
Arts & Life

Jesus In A Lowrider: El Rito's Santero Carves Saints In Modern Clothing

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 12:30 pm

Nicholas Herrera sits in his studio, surrounded by his carvings. (Photos are courtesy of David Michael Kennedy, another El Rito artist, who was featured on NPR in 2011.)
Courtesy of David Michael Kennedy

There are two things that have put El Rito on the map. In the little village in northern New Mexico, there's a tiny cafe that serves the best red-chile Frito pie in the world. And then there's the santeroNicholas Herrera.

"This is where I live," says Herrera. "This is my studio."

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7:44am

Sat July 18, 2015
The Salt

A Battle Royale To Keep McDonald's Out Of Historic Food Hub In Paris

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:33 am

The Arc de Triomphe is visible behind a McDonald's restaurant on the Champs Elysees in Paris, France. The nation is now McDonald's second-biggest market, but one historic neighborhood known as "the belly of Paris" has pledged to keep it out.
Alastair Miller Bloomberg via Getty Images

The U.S. and Europe are in the midst of negotiating a historic trade deal that will create the world's largest consumer market: some 800 million people. Despite promises that the agreement will create thousands of new jobs, there's fierce resistance to it in Europe, especially when it comes to food.

Many Europeans say they want to preserve a way of life and eating that they say America's industrial farming and multinational corporations threaten. A smaller version of that battle is being fought in one Paris neighborhood known as "the belly of Paris."

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4:39pm

Fri July 17, 2015
Movie Reviews

Sleuthing With Offbeat Variations In 'Irrational Man' And 'Mr. Holmes'

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 10:03 pm

Irrational Man is a Hitchcock-style mystery wrapped in a Woody Allen romance.
Sabrina Lantos Courtesy of Sony Pictures Classics

I'm gonna guess that in pitch meetings, and maybe even in script form, Woody Allen's Irrational Man and Bill Condon's Mr. Holmes looked a lot like police procedurals.

Happily their directors didn't leave them on the page, so they've warped into something a little different: A mystery of memory and the aging mind in the case of Mr. Holmes, a romance in the Hitchcock tradition for Irrational Man.

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