Arts

7:25am

Sun April 12, 2015
Around the Nation

On Steel Horses They Ride — To Honor 19th-Century Cavalries

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

Reverend Jeff Moore blesses a biker at the Buffalo Soldiers Motorcycle Club rally in San Jose, Calif.
Leila Day KALW

In the mid- and late 1800s, the Buffalo Soldiers were all-black cavalries and regiments deployed to patrol and protect what would eventually become America's national parks.

Their moniker was said to have been given to the cavalries by Native Americans who thought the soldiers' hair resembled the woolly texture of a buffalo.

It's a name that carries a lot of pride — and one that lives on today. But instead of horses, today's Buffalo Soldiers ride bikes.

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5:37am

Sun April 12, 2015
Television

'Nurse Jackie' Ends As TV's Most Honest Depiction Of Addiction

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 4:46 pm

Edie Falco stars in Showtime's "Nurse Jackie."
David M. Russell Showtime

Even after an accident with a carload full of pills gets her arrested, Nurse Jackie Peyton can't be honest about her addictions. Especially not while explaining her sudden absence to her ex-husband Kevin.

"Where were you this past week?" Kevin asks, tensely.

"Really, you want to know where I was?" Jackie responds. "I went to a detox program."

"Is that what you call jail?" he shoots back. "I was notified of the accident. The car's still in my name."

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5:27am

Sun April 12, 2015
The Salt

Adventures In Vietnam — Street Food, Love And Taking Chances

Originally published on Sun April 12, 2015 11:01 am

Courtesy of Ecco Publishing

When English journalist Graham Holliday got tired of his office job in the U.K., he knew he wanted a change — a big one.

So he packed up and moved to Asia, first to Korea to teach English and ultimately, to the place that would be his home for nine years: Vietnam. As soon as he arrived, he was determined to immerse himself in Vietnamese culture — and for him, that meant food.

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6:09pm

Sat April 11, 2015
Television

'American Odyssey': Three Ordinary People, One Thrill-Filled Plot

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:47 pm

In American Odyssey, Anna Friel plays Sgt. Odelle Ballard, who is stationed in Mali. After her team is killed, she finds herself running for her life — which includes disguising herself as a man.
Keith Bernstein NBC

Action, espionage and secrets fill the new NBC show American Odyssey.

But Peter Horton, the show's co-creator and executive producer, says it's easiest to describe the show by saying what it's not. "It's not a police show, it's not an FBI show, it's not a CIA show," he tell's NPR's Arun Rath. "It's a modern-day thriller told in three story bubbles, basically, about three very ordinary people."

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6:09pm

Sat April 11, 2015
Author Interviews

A Dark, Funny — And Vietnamese — Look At The Vietnam War

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 9:04 pm

The Captain, a Communist sympathizer who's risen through the ranks of the South Vietnamese Army, has a confession:

I am a spy, a sleeper, a spook, a man of two faces. Perhaps not surprisingly, I am also a man of two minds. I am not some misunderstood mutant from a comic book or a horror movie, although some have treated me as such. I am simply able to see any issue from both sides.

So begins Viet Thanh Nguyen's new novel, The Sympathizer.

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3:48pm

Sat April 11, 2015
All Tech Considered

How Iconic: A Word Is Worth Thousands Of Pictures

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 10:37 am

The Noun Project uses crowdsourcing to gather an army of people to define words using icons. This is just a small selection of the huge icon dictionary.
Creative Stall via Noun Project

Picture a dictionary that doesn't need words to get the point across.

It started after Edward Boatman read the book The Professor and the Madman by Simon Winchester. The book is about Professor James Murray, the man who compiled the first Oxford English Dictionary. But Murray didn't do it alone. He had an army of people ready to help define every word in the English language.

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7:46am

Sat April 11, 2015
Author Interviews

How Jim Grimsley Shed His 'Racist' Skin

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 12:33 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

TAMARA KEITH, HOST:

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7:43am

Sat April 11, 2015
Arts & Life

Inside The Wild (And Hand-Drawn) World Of Bill Plympton

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 10:54 am

Jake and Ella meet cute on the bumper cars in Cheatin', but their perfect romance goes wrong after another woman starts scheming to drive them apart.
Plymptoons

Bill Plympton has come to be known as the king of indie animation — he's made seven animated features, all carefully hand-drawn. The latest has just been released — it's called Cheatin', and it's a wild tale of love, betrayal and bumper cars. Like many of Plympton's films, it has no dialogue.

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7:43am

Sat April 11, 2015
Movie Interviews

For Fans Of 'Super Troopers,' Meow They're Getting A Sequel

Originally published on Sat April 11, 2015 2:38 pm

Super Troopers director and actor Jay Chandrasekhar (left), along with other castmates from the cult comedy film, solicit investment for a sequel in a screengrab from their IndieGogo campaign.
Broken Lizard/IndieGogo

Vermont's fictional and utterly zany state troopers are headed to Canada in Super Troopers 2, the planned sequel to the 2001 cult comedy film.

At least, that's what the film's director and co-star Jay Chandrasekhar seemed to unintentionally reveal in an interview with NPR's Tamara Keith on Weekend Edition.

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7:03am

Sat April 11, 2015
Book Reviews

Autobiographical 'Indian' Probes A Painful Past

"How are you meant to behave?" asks Jón Gnarr in his autobiographical novel The Indian. "What are these invisible rules that I don't know? What is 'normal'?" It's possible that Gnarr, the punk rocker turned comedian turned mayor of Reykjavík has never known what normal is, and thank goodness for that.

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