Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

4 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

William Daley Has Left The Arena

Sep 17, 2013
Originally published on September 17, 2013 6:45 pm

When William M. Daley — son and brother of famous Chicago mayors, former Obama White House chief of staff and all-around Democratic pooh-bah — was President Clinton's commerce secretary, he kept in his office a framed passage from Theodore Roosevelt's "Citizenship in a Republic" speech.

"It's not the critic who counts. ... The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena."

Daley apparently has decided he doesn't want to be that man in the arena, at least if the arena is the Illinois governor's race.

He unexpectedly dropped his bid for Illinois governor on Monday, telling the Chicago Tribune: "This isn't the best thing for me."

Youngest child of Richard J. Daley — Da Mayor of Mayors who from the 1950s to 1970s was the very model of the big city political boss — the younger Daley shocked many with his campaign exit.

Being as close to big-time politics as long as he has, how could he not have known what he was getting into when he entered the governor's race? How could he not have made his peace with all that it entails long before now? How could he have done this after just hiring a campaign manager?

Daley told my old Chicago Tribune colleague, political writer Rick Pearson, he essentially didn't know the nitty-gritty of a political candidacy wasn't for him until he actually got involved in the current race. (Daley had considered running for governor several years ago, but decided not to enter that race.)

Again, that will seem strange, especially to people primed by Chicago political history to think there must be more to Daley's decision than meets the eye.

But there's no reason not to take him at his word. Daley, who has made bountiful sums in the opaque world of investment banking, has long seemed to me most in his comfort zone as the backroom wheeler-dealer who advises the boss, the guy behind The Guy who stood for election. That's who he was as Al Gore's campaign chairman in the 2000 presidential race, or Obama's White House chief of staff.

Back during the Clinton administration, when I would see Daley often, I asked him if he would ever run for elected office. "I wouldn't cross it off," he said. "I would never say never."

That didn't sound like a man itching to place his name before the voters. Instead, it sounded more like someone who enjoyed toying with the idea of keeping the family franchise alive, like his father and then his brother, former Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley. Another brother, John, has been a longtime local political player as Chicago's 11th Ward committeeman and a commissioner on the Cook County Board.

Just one member of the next generation of Daleys, Richard J. Daley's grandson, currently holds elected office. Patrick Daley Thompson won a seat on the Chicago Metropolitan Water Reclamation District last year.

Following Thompson's election, Bill Daley predicted to the Chicago Sun-Times last December that more of his younger family members would follow suit and eventually seek public office.

They can have it, Daley seems to be saying now. He has left the arena.

(Adam Wollner contributed.)

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.