"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Will French Election Mark A Reversal Of Austerity?

May 3, 2012
Originally published on May 9, 2012 10:43 am

The possibility that French President Nicolas Sarkozy may lose the presidential election Sunday is making waves across Europe. Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel are the architects of Europe's new fiscal austerity pact.

But the man likely to replace Sarkozy has other ideas.

Socialist candidate Francois Hollande — who is favored in opinion polls by several percentage points — says Europe cannot emerge from the crisis based on austerity alone.

Hollande is calling for a rethink, to foster growth strategies. And many across Europe welcome the change a new French president might bring.

This year's presidential campaign spawned a huge anti-capitalist backlash. On May Day, the traditional workers holiday, tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Paris to denounce the world of finance — the bankers, traders and profit-seekers who they say have ruined regular, hard-working people.

In a catchy phrase that rhymes in French, protesters chanted, "There's plenty of money for the people, you'll find it in the CEOs' pockets."

Proposing A New Direction

This mood was reflected across Europe in similar demonstrations.

Many Europeans are also angry about austerity measures squeezing the working class from Athens to Lisbon. After months of painful cuts with nothing to show, many say they feel the path set out by Merkel and Sarkozy, often referred to as Merkozy, is the wrong one.

Gwenael Braz, 30, carried a Greek flag during the Paris march. On his T-shirt the word Merkozy had a giant X through it. Braz says the people of Greece and other countries have suffered from their austerity, and French voters will change that on Sunday.

"When you vote as a French, you have more power within Europe than when you vote as a Greek," he says. "We have to change the Merkozy things. We can put Sarkozy out, a Greek cannot."

In a contentious presidential debate Wednesday night, Hollande accused Sarkozy of selling out French interests to German demands for austerity. Hollande said he will push to re-negotiate the austerity pact to include proposals to boost growth and job creation.

"My obligation, if I become president, is to give another direction to Europe than the one that is being forced upon us today," he said.

Hollande went on to say that he has noticed a change of mindset in Europe since he began talking about growth. Even though Spain, the Netherlands and Italy have conservative governments, they're all talking about a different approach now, Hollande said.

Weighing A Europe-Wide Growth Strategy

Analysts say opposition to the Merkozy austerity plan is growing across Europe, and many now view a possible Hollande election as a way to shift the dynamics.

"It's something that in Italy is felt very, very deeply," says Beppe Severgnini, a financial columnist with the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera. "Someone who thinks that growth is more important than austerity and can join forces to tell Merkel that it's not enough to say cut, cut, cut, and we really need to grow."

Matthieu Pigasse, chief executive of Lazard Financial Advisory in France, says the change is not just political.

"As the political discourse changes in Europe, we are also seeing the perception of the financial markets evolve. The markets now want to see a growth-based strategy adopted," says Pigasse, who is also advising the Greek government on how to tackle its financial woes.

But Tomasz Michalski, a professor at HEC, one of France's top business schools, says he doesn't believe a Europe-wide growth strategy can work.

"The reasons for the current malaise in different countries are completely different. So it's not clear that having a growth pact will address all the problems of all the countries at the same time," he says. "And basically a lot of countries want these growth policies to avoid painful reforms."

The austerity pact pushed through by Merkozy still has to be ratified by parliaments in many countries, including Germany and France. Sunday's French presidential runoff may determine which course Europe will follow.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Now to France which holds its presidential election runoff this Sunday. The possibility that President Nicolas Sarkozy may lose is making waves across Europe. Sarkozy and German Chancellor Angela Merkel are the architects of Europe's fiscal austerity pact. And the man who may win the French election has been campaigning against austerity. Socialist candidate Francois Hollande says Europe cannot emerge from its crisis on a dose of austerity alone.

NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris on the many people who have rallied to his message.

ELEANOR BEARDSLEY, BYLINE: This year's French presidential campaign spawned a huge anti-capitalist backlash. On May Day, the traditional workers holiday, tens of thousands of people took to the streets of Paris to denounce the greedy world of finance - the bankers, traders and profit seekers who they say have ruined regular, hardworking people.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTERS)

BEARDSLEY: In a catchy phrase that rhymes in French, protesters chanted, there's plenty of money for the people, you'll find it in the CEO's pockets.

(SOUNDBITE OF SINGING PROTESTERS)

BEARDSLEY: This mood was reflected across Europe in similar May Day demonstrations. Many Europeans are also angry about austerity measures squeezing the working-class, from Athens to Lisbon. After months of painful cuts with nothing to show for it, they say they feel the path set out by Merkel and Sarkozy, often referred to as Merkozy, is the wrong one.

In Paris, 30-year-old protester Gwenael Braz carries a Greek flag. On his T-shirt the word Merkozy has a giant X through it. Braz says the people of Greece and other countries have suffered, and French voters will change that on Sunday.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHANTING PROTESTERS)

GWENAEL BRAZ: When you vote as a French, you have more power within Europe than when you vote as a Greek. We have to change the Merkozy things. We can put Sarkozy out. A Greek cannot.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW)

BEARDSLEY: In a contentious presidential debate last night, Hollande accused Sarkozy of selling out French interests to German demands for austerity. Hollande says he will push to renegotiate the austerity pact to include proposals to boost growth and job creation.

FRANCOIS HOLLANDE: (Through Translator) My obligation, if I become president, is to give another direction to Europe than the one that is being forced upon us today.

BEARDSLEY: Hollande went on to say, that he has noticed a change of mindset in Europe since he began talking about growth. Spain, the Netherlands, Italy, even though they're conservative governments, they're all talking about a different approach now, he said.

Analysts say opposition to the Merkozy austerity dictate is growing across Europe, and many now view a possible Hollande election as a way to shift the dynamics. Beppe Severgnini is a financial columnist with Italian newspaper Crreire dela Sera.

BEPPE SEVERGNINI: It's something that in Italy is felt very, very deeply. Someone who thinks that growth is more important than austerity, and can sort of join forces to tell Markel that it's not enough to say cut, cut, cut. And we really need to grow.

BEARDSLEY: Mathieu Pigasse, with financial advisory firm Lazard, says the change is not just political.

MATTHIEU PIGASSE: (Through Translator) As the political discourse changes in Europe, we're also seeing the perception of the financial markets evolve. The markets now want to see a growth-based strategy adopted.

BEARDSLEY: But Tomasz Michalski, a professor at HEC, one of France's top business schools, says he doesn't believe a Europe-wide growth strategy can work.

TOMASZ MICHALSKI: The reasons for the malaise, the current malaise in different countries are completely different. So it's not clear that having a growth pact will address all the problems of all countries at the same time. And basically, a lot of countries, they want these growth policies exactly to avoid painful reforms.

BEARDSLEY: The austerity pact pushed through by Merkozy still has to be ratified by parliaments in many countries, including Germany and France. Sunday's French presidential runoff may determine which course Europe is to follow.

Eleanor Beardsley, NPR news, Paris. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.