Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Into The Wild Science Of Sourdough Bread-Making

Mar 21, 2012
Originally published on March 21, 2012 4:50 pm

My sister is no science writer, and I'm no baker, but recently our worlds melded in a surprising way.

Here's what happened: Last October, I attended a workshop on artisanal bread and cheese-making at Salt Water Farms in Lincolnville, Maine. Farm manager Ladleah Dunn introduced us to the concept of making sourdough bread with levain, or starter, instead of packaged yeast.

I have to confess that I thought sourdough didn't have any yeast. Wrong. It can be made with a commercial yeast strain or "wild" yeast, harvested right from the air.

To make a wild yeast starter, you mix flour and water together, and wait for bubbles. Those bubbles are filled with carbon dioxide, and tell you the wild yeast has stumbled on the flour and water, and is digesting it.

Later, when you bake the leavened bread, the air bubbles expand in the intense heat, so your loaf isn't a solid brick but a chewy delight. It may even be denser and chewier that yeast bread, almost like a bagel.

I told my sister Margaret, owner and operator of Margaret Palca Bakes in Brooklyn, N.Y., about this, and she said, "I want to try this."

So Margaret made a starter from honest-to-goodness Brooklyn yeast, and then started to make loaves with it.

But she had a problem. She called to tell me that the bread made with this wild Brooklyn yeast was sourer than she'd like. Was there any way to wrestle it back from its acrid extremes?

I'll get to the bottom of this, I assured her. After all, I'm a science correspondent.

First step: find out what's causing the sour taste. I wrote to Robert Wolke, professor emeritus of chemistry at the University of Pittsburgh and author of What Einstein Told His Cook.

"The sour flavors come from lactic and acetic acids produced by inevitable environmental bacteria, which are working on the flour's sugars along with the yeast," he responded in an email. "Different bacteria make different sour flavors; San Francisco is awash in local bacteria species that makes its sourdough bread famous. So sourness per se in some ryes and many other breads is quite desirable."

OK, but how do you get rid of it if you don't like it? Wolke wasn't sure.

Next step: call Shirley Corriher, a food scientist and author of BakeWise: The Hows and Whys of Successful Baking. She said the trick to keeping the starter sweet was to slow down the metabolic rate of those Brooklyn bacteria. That way they won't produce as much acid. To do that, Corriher said Margaret should keep her starter chilled. Either that or feed it with fresh flour every two hours.

Margaret tried both – at least she refrigerated the starter and fed it three times a day instead of once a day. But it turned out that her customers had grown fond of the sourness. "I was the only one who wanted it less sour," she says.

But she's not finished with her experiment. "There are so many variables – the temperature of the water, how often you feed it, the flour, the kind of oven."

One thing Margaret would like to add, if you're going to try this at home, is that your best bet with leavened bread is to use a dutch oven, or a pot with a lid, if you want your bread to get a nice-looking crust. "You need to give it heat and steam all around; otherwise your bread will be ugly," she says.

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