Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Where Eye Care Is A Luxury, Technology Offers Access

Feb 6, 2012
Originally published on February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

For millions of people in the developing world, one thing stands between them and a job or an education: a good pair of glasses. Quality eye care is often a luxury in areas where health services are scarce. So researchers and entrepreneurs are looking for breakthrough technologies to bring the cost of glasses and eye exams way down.

One group thinks that smartphones could help provide needed access to vision health care. Researchers at EyeNetra, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology spinoff company, are working on a device that would turn the phones into eye exam machines.

"Our goal, really, is to empower millions and millions around the world by bringing eye care to people's homes in a way that was never possible before," says EyeNetra's David Schafran.

EyeNetra has developed a $2 scope that health care workers can clip onto a smartphone. The patient stares through the eyepiece and follows colored lines that appear on the screen. Software installed on the phone translates responses into a measurement of "refractive error," which optometrists need to make a pair of glasses.

Schafran says it's just a question of leveraging the power of the smartphone.

"The phone is actually doing everything," he says. "It's projecting the images, and it's also doing the calculations — that's where all the smarts are."

EyeNetra is testing these devices in clinics all over the world. The hope is they will be accurate enough to change optometry both in developing countries and maybe even in more affluent areas.

'Science Helps,' But It's No Doctor

There is skepticism. The classic eye exam starts with an automated reading by an expensive machine, which EyeNetra aims to replace. Next, your doctor follows up with a series of questions like, "Which lens helps you see better: No. 1 or No. 2?" Kuldev Singh, an ophthalmologist at Stanford University, says for the patient to be happy, that second, subjective test is crucial.

"Science helps, but I don't think there's a substitute for actually checking to see if the patient is satisfied with the refraction that any automated device will find," Singh says.

EyeNetra says relying on the automated exam can be just as accurate — and makes the exam cheaper and more accessible.

Liquid Lenses

But once patients get their prescriptions, they still have to get the glasses made. EyeNetra's developers envision a network of providers that would use the prescription to provide the patient with glasses.

But in some places, patients are actually building their own eyewear. The Centre for Vision in the Developing World is collaborating with Dow Corning to make cheap glasses with lenses made of liquid silicon. Dow Corning's James Stephenson says the glasses are equipped with a little pump that can adjust the shape of this liquid lens.

"The user basically looks through the glasses," he says. "They cover up one eye, and they literally turn the pump until the object comes into very clear vision."

The biggest downside with these glasses — initially called Adspecs — is that they're pretty clunky looking. The developers are working on a sleeker, more stylish version.

Nothing Beats A Complete Eye Exam

According to their creators, these are promising technologies. But those who work in the developing world caution that many patients don't even know that they could see better, so they don't ask for help. And Singh says that when it comes to eye care, it's also important to go beyond the need for glasses.

According to Singh, these new technologies are "not a substitute for a complete exam that checks the eyes for potentially blinding diseases, like glaucoma and macular degeneration."

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

For millions of people in the developing world, one thing stands between them and school or a job, and that is a good pair of glasses. Eye care is often a luxury in areas where health services are scarce. So, researchers and entrepreneurs are looking for breakthrough technologies to bring down the cost of glasses and eye exams.

NPR's Larry Abramson reports that one idea starts with a smartphone.

LARRY ABRAMSON, BYLINE: While glasses may be hard to come by in some places, smartphones are becoming more and more common. So, a group of researchers is trying to turn those phones into eye exam machines.

David Schafran is with Eyenetra, an MIT spinoff company developing a connection between eyes and cell phones.

DAVID SCHAFRAN: And our goal really is to empower millions and millions around the world, by bringing eye care to people's homes in a way that was never possible before.

ABRAMSON: Eyenetra has developed a $2 scope that health care workers can clip onto a smartphone. The patient stares through the eyepiece and follows colored lines that appear on the screen. Software installed on the phone translates your responses into a measurement of your refractive error - that's what an optometrist needs to make you a pair of glasses. .

Schafran says, it's just a question of leveraging the power of the smartphone.

SCHAFRAN: Well, the phone is actually doing everything. It's projecting the images, and it's also doing the calculations - that's where all the smarts are.

ABRAMSON: Eyenetra is testing these devices in clinics all over the world. The hope is that they will be accurate enough to change optometry, both in developing countries and maybe even in more affluent areas.

But there is skepticism. The classic eye exam starts with an automated reading by an expensive machine, which Eyenetra aims to replace. Next, your doctor follows up with a series of questions: Which lens helps you see better, number one or number two?

Kuldev Singh, a professor at Stanford University, says for the consumer to be happy, that second subjective test is crucial.

KULDEV SINGH: Science helps, but I don't think there's a substitute for actually checking to see if the patient is satisfied with the refraction that any automated device will find.

Eyenetra says relying on the automated exam can be just as accurate, and it makes the process cheaper and more accessible. But once you get your prescription, you still have to get the glasses made. Eyenetra's developers envision a network of providers that would lead from prescription to eyewear.

ABRAMSON: But in some places, patients are already building their own glasses. The Center for Vision in the Developing World is collaborating with Dow Corning on cheap glasses with lenses made of liquid silicon. Dow's James Stephenson says, initially, the glasses are equipped with a little pump that can adjust the shape of this liquid lens.

JAMES STEPHENSON: And the user basically looks through the glasses. They cover up one eye, and they literally turn the pump until the object comes into very clear vision.

ABRAMSON: The biggest downside with these glasses, initially called Adspecs, is that they're pretty clunky looking. The developers are working on a sleeker, more stylish version.

These are promising technologies. But those who work in the developing world caution that many patients don't know that they could see better, so they don't ask for help. And Stanford's Kuldev Singh says once you get a patient to come to a clinic, it's important to go beyond glasses.

SINGH: Certainly it's not a substitute for a complete exam that checks the eyes for potentially blinding diseases like glaucoma and macular degeneration.

ABRAMSON: At the same time, a little health care is better than none at all, especially when the ability to see well can mean so much to a child trying to see a blackboard in school.

Larry Abramson, NPR News.

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