Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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When Food Truck Horns Meet Wedding Bells

Feb 28, 2012
Originally published on February 28, 2012 2:02 pm

Owning a food truck may sound like fun – it's a free wheeling, superhip, and low-cost way to experiment with food service. But increasingly food truckers are finding that they're up against some unfriendly realities of city streets, namely a shortage of parking spots.

That's why many, like Nida Rodriguez, who steers the helm of The Slide Ride, a Chicago truck that dishes out gourmet mini sandwiches, are now focused on catering events from office parties to weddings.

Rodriguez says that from the start she was getting requests from brides-to-be to serve her Guinness burgers and reubens at their weddings — as late-night fare or to keep guests busy between the ceremony and reception. And she says The Slide Ride is booked for 10 weddings this summer. Catering makes up 20 percent of her total business.

Rodriguez isn't alone. Food truck owners around the country say catering is an increasingly appealing alternative to braving downtown streets at lunchtime. "If I offered any truck that they'd never have to be on the street again and they only had to do catering, every single one would do it," says Matt Geller, co-founder and CEO of the Southern California Mobile Food Vendors Association.

As food trucks have swarmed the streets of cities around the country, some city councils and brick-and-mortar restaurants have fought back, enacting regulations to make it harder for them to linger.

In Chicago, for example, the city mandates that food trucks cannot park within 200 feet of a restaurant—including convenience stores like 7-Eleven that serve food. So some trucks have resorted to "parking a car in the morning in a good location...when it comes closer to lunch they'll swap their car out for the truck," says Richard Myrick, editor-in-chief of Mobile Cuisine, an online magazine.

Roy Choi is a Los Angeles-area chef credited with pioneering the country's first gourmet food truck, a Korean barbeque taco operation called Kogi. Choi's story is perhaps the most legendary in the business: From his first truck, whose location was regularly broadcast on Twitter, he has been able to spin off five more. And now he also has 3 restaurants and a catering business in the Los Angeles area. (He also earned the no. 1 spot on Smithsonian's list of the 20 Best Food Trucks in the U.S.)

Catering accounts for about 30 percent of his business, says Choi; his trucks serve everything from office parties, birthdays, weddings, quinceñeras to bat mitzvahs.

One advantage of hiring a food truck for a wedding is the casual mood it projects, says Corina Beczner, founder and owner of Vibrant Events, a green event planning company in San Francisco.

But it won't be for everyone. "I do love food trucks but I think for the traditional wedding approach they don't work," particularly when guests expect seating and a set mealtime, she says. "This is all new and it's an experiment."

What may appeal to many betrothed couples is the price: The Slide Ride, for one, starts its catering packages at $10 a head.

And food trucks' drift into events is cultural as much as economic. The immigrants in Los Angeles who patronized some of the earliest food trucks were used to eating on the street, says Choi. Now lots of other Americans embrace that, too, even on one of the most important days of their lives — the wedding day.

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