"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

Let the record show: neither version of those lyrics contains the phrase "all lives matter."

But at the 2016 All-Star Game, the song got an unexpected edit.

At Petco Park in San Diego, one member of the Canadian singing group The Tenors — by himself, according to the other members of the group — revised the anthem.

School's out, and a lot of parents are getting through the long summer days with extra helpings of digital devices.

How should we feel about that?

Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

A Timeless Story Takes A 'Brave' Female Twist

Jun 22, 2012
Originally published on June 22, 2012 7:17 am

After movies starring the likes of Buzz Lightyear, a little robot named Wall-E, a fish called Nemo and a car named Lightning McQueen, Pixar is releasing its first film with a female lead.

Brave is also Pixar's first fairy tale. It's set in a medieval kingdom in the highlands of Scotland, where a queen stages a competition. Suitors from rival clans vie for the chance to marry her daughter. Each clan puts forth its finest, but the feisty princess is unimpressed. And she takes matters into her own hands: Grabbing her bow and arrow, and flipping back her mane of wild red curls, she enters the competition herself.

Princess Merida is voiced by the Scottish actress Kelly Macdonald, who tells NPR's Linda Wertheimer that the film actually could have been set "anywhere, at any time."

"It's about that mother-daughter dynamic and the trouble teenage girls can find themselves in when they start battling their mother," she says. "I loved all that. I'm sort of nervous for my mother to see the film, to be honest, because I spend the whole film going, 'Mom!' I think she's going to be a nervous wreck."

Macdonald, known for her roles in movies like Trainspotting and the TV series Boardwalk Empire, took on a very different kind of character in Brave.

"I was really lucky. I think I fed a lot off of Mark Andrews, the director, who is the loudest, most exuberant man I've ever met," Macdonald says.

She says working on an animated film was a challenge, though.

"It's totally different from film and television acting," she says. "And I really loved it. It was really liberating."


Interview Highlights

NPR's Linda Wertheimer speaks with Brave producer Katherine Sarafian

On animating Princess Merida's hair, which required Pixar to create new software

"We'd really worked with the same suite of software since the earliest days. So it was definitely time for an upgrade, but adopting new software is highly traumatic for a team. Everything had to be reinvented. But, you know, it was worth it, because the story served up this challenge of this spirited, untamed wild child of a girl. And that hair was part of her design and part of her character."

On visiting the real scene to get the on-screen setting just right

"When we got there, what we discovered was that the land is just steeped in legend and storytelling. Every person we met told us some sort of story ... every tree and rock and blade of grass seemed to have its own story."

On having a team that included several women

"The industry is gradually changing and shifting, and I think we have more women coming into animation and story programs in schools than we ever had. Interestingly, a lot of our top animation folks who handled horse animation and the animal animation that's very tricky to do were female animators. I don't know if it's girls and their horses or what, but we really had a lot of great, knowledgeable horse folk on the film who were women as well."

On dedicating the film to Pixar co-founder Steve Jobs

"We lost Steve during production of this film, and our card at the end of the film says, 'Partner, mentor and friend.' And he was all those things and more to us. ... Much is said about Steve ... but I think there's nothing like working with him and knowing him directly, as we did. And he always used to tell us, 'Make it great. Make it insanely great.' He saw the movie — early versions of it — and I sure wish that he had been able to see it finished, because I want to believe he'd be really proud of us."

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.