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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town, Virginia Beach, Va., to give a speech Tuesday on how he would go about reforming the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Teenage Girls Will Still Need A Prescription For 'Plan B'

Dec 7, 2011

In a surprising twist, the Obama administration has overruled the Food and Drug Administration and will not allow teenage girls to buy the emergency contraceptive Plan B One-Step without a prescription.

The decision punctuates one of the longest-running public health sagas in recent memory. The FDA had decided that a version of the morning-after emergency contraceptive pill could be sold without a prescription regardless of the age of the buyer.

As FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg said in a statement Wednesday:

"I reviewed and thoughtfully considered the data, clinical information, and analysis provided by [FDA's Center For Drug Evaluation and Research], and I agree with the Center that there is adequate and reasonable, well-supported, and science-based evidence that Plan B One-Step is safe and effective and should be approved for nonprescription use for all females of child-bearing potential."

But Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius (Hamburg's boss) disagreed with the FDA's assessment in this memo. Sebelius wrote:

"Based on my review, I have concluded that the data submitted for this product do not establish that prescription dispensing requirements should be eliminated for all ages."

Sebelius told the FDA to tell the maker of the drug that its marketing application is "inadequate to support approval." In other words, its bid to sell Plan B to teens without a prescription has been officially rejected.

The present product, Plan B One-Step, didn't even exist when the FDA's advisory committees on over-the-counter medicines and reproductive health drugs voted 23-4 to recommend that the original, two-pill product, be made available without prescription to all age groups. The single-pill version was approved in 2009.

Both the original Plan B and Plan B One-Step contain the same ingredients as regular birth control pills, but in higher doses. They are highly effective at preventing pregnancy if taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex, but will not interrupt an already established pregnancy. They aren't the same as the abortion pill mifepristone.

The FDA, however, which normally follows the advice of its advisory committees, did not in the case of Plan B. As the months dragged on with no decision, women's health groups and Democratic women lawmakers on Capitol Hill accused the George W. Bush administration of playing politics with the issue.

Finally, in 2006, the FDA issued a split decision of sorts. It said Plan B could be sold to those over the age of 18 without a prescription, but younger women would need a doctor's permission first.

The FDA in 2009 ordered that age lowered to 17 to comply with a federal judge's order. And that's where it will remain.

Update 2:18 p.m.: Teva Pharmaceuticals, the maker of Plan B, commended FDA for recommending an easing of restrictions on over-the-counter access to the drug. "We are disappointed that at this late date, the Department of Health and Human Services has come to a different conclusion," Teva said in a statement. The company said it will determine its "next steps" after receiving the official letter from FDA on the decision.

Copyright 2011 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.