Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

1 hour ago
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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Swell Of Goodwill For First Medicare Chief Confirmed Since 2004

May 16, 2013

When the Senate voted Tuesday to make Marilyn Tavenner the official administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, it was the first time the world's greatest deliberative body had approved someone to head the huge health agency since 2004.

That's right, you have to go way back to the Bush administration to find Dr. Mark McClellan, the last person to be officially put in the post.

Tavenner, who has been running the agency in an acting capacity since late 2011, has a big job. CMS oversees Medicare, Medicaid, and the Children's Health Insurance Plan, which together serve north of 100 million Americans and have a combined budget larger than the Defense Department's.

CMS is also playing a major role in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act. The agency is in charge of the Medicare changes in the law, the creation of health exchanges and a significant expansion in Medicaid.

She comes to the agency with a reservoir of good will that eluded two previous nominees for the job, Obama appointee Donald Berwick and Bush appointee Kerry Weems.

Tavenner, a nurse, hospital executive, and one-time Virginia health secretary won the backing of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, which made it safe for many Senate Republicans to support her.

She also benefited from auspicious timing. Weems' nomination got caught up in the politics of the Children's Health Insurance Program renewal; Berwick's in the furious fight over the Affordable Care Act. Even McClellan's nomination was held up briefly because then Sen. Byron Dorgan, D-N.D., was irritated because McClellan, in his previous position as commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration, had opposed Dorgan's legislation allowing easier importation of cheaper prescription drugs from Canada and other industrialized nations.

Tavenner also takes over just as the agency is getting some good news from the Congressional Budget Office.

It seems that CBO is among the agencies now predicting a slowdown in health spending. The latest 10-year spending estimates for Medicare and Medicaid, according to CBO, are down some $225 billion ($138 billion for Medicare and $89 for Medicaid) from where they were in March 2010.

Finally, of course, Tavenner takes the reins officially with a groundswell of goodwill from those whose economic future she now controls. Within moments of her confirmation, reporters' inboxes were flooded with congratulations and praise.

"Her leadership, extensive experience and strong knowledge of the healthcare system are huge assets in tackling our nation's healthcare challenges moving forward," said Scott Serota, president and CEO of the Blue Cross/Blue Shield Association.

Agreed Rich Umbdenstock, president and CEO of the American Hospital Association, "As acting administrator, Marilyn has demonstrated her willingness to listen to, learn from and work in partnership with the nation's health care providers."

She better enjoy it now. It only gets harder from here.

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