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The Republican National Convention is in 4 days in Cleveland.

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NASA has released the first picture of Jupiter taken since the Juno spacecraft went into orbit around the planet on July 4.

The picture was taken on July 10. Juno was 2.7 million miles from Jupiter at the time. The color image shows some of the atmospheric features of the planet, including the giant red spot. You can also see three of Jupiter's moons in the picture: Io, Europa and Ganymede.

The Senate is set to approve a bill intended to change the way police and health care workers treat people struggling with opioid addictions.

My husband and I once took great pleasure in preparing meals from scratch. We made pizza dough and sauce. We baked bread. We churned ice cream.

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"O Canada," the national anthem of our neighbors up north, comes in two official versions — English and French. They share a melody, but differ in meaning.

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Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she disparaged him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb political statements" about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

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A Star At U.S. Open, NFL Opens, Paralympics To Close

Sep 8, 2012

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Time for sports.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

SIMON: (Singing) Ah, to remember the kind of September.... The seasons are flipping, and so Serena's poised to win again, not just today. NFL season opens in earnest, and the real Olympic spirit still lives on in London. NPR's Tom Goldman joins us.

Morning, Tom.

TOM GOLDMAN, BYLINE: Seasons are flipping, I fear you are too.

(LAUGHTER)

SIMON: Tom, I'll make the jokes here, please.

GOLDMAN: Thank you.

SIMON: We have a couple of hard news stories to get right into this morning. There's two men's semi-final matches and the woman's final still to go at the U.S. Open, but play's being delayed because of the weather. This being noted, is Serena Williams just in another dimension than any other player at this point?

GOLDMAN: Yeah, and she's going to have to be in another dimension tomorrow because the finals has been postponed because of the weather to Sunday. You know, yes, another dimension. Consider what Sara Errani said. She's the player Williams stumped in the semifinals in a little over an hour. Errani suggested maybe it's time for Serena Williams to try the men's draw, at least at lower levels. Since losing in the first round of the French Open in May, Williams is 25-1. She has won Wimbledon, an Olympic gold.

She plays the number one seed Victoria Azarenka in the final. Williams holds a 9-1 record in matches versus Azarenka; a really good chance for a tenth win tonight.

SIMON: And the other breaking story this morning is that Stephen Strasburg's season is over. The Washington Nationals' star, who helped pitch them to a multi-game lead of the National League East is going to be set down for the rest of the year, including the playoffs. It's his first season back after elbow surgery; what they call Tommy John surgery. And Davey Johnson, the manager, indicated that that was the day-to-day speculation alone that was causing some - on top of everything else - that was causing wear on Stephen Strasburg.

GOLDMAN: Yeah, and this follows a horrible outing by Strasburg last night, in which the Nats lost. Yeah, it wasn't the elbow. It was all the talk about the shutdown that was getting him down. He felt that he was letting his team down by not being available during the post-season, in this breakout season for the Nats. So, yes, manager Davey Johnson said let's just shut it down now.

SIMON: I want to contrast this with how Atlanta has treated Kris Medlen recovering from the same surgery. They brought him along in the bullpen. They didn't use him as a starter until July 31st. He's now the hottest pitcher in baseball. He hasn't given up a hit in five games. If Atlanta wins that wildcard spot in the National League East, Kris Medlen is going to be in the playoffs. Was that, with the advantage of hindsight, a wiser way of handling the pitcher coming back from this surgery?

GOLDMAN: Well, yes. You mentioned the ifs. If Atlanta gets to the post-season, if Atlanta wins the World Series and Medlen contributes, yes, it was a good way, the better way perhaps. If that doesn't happen, and if Washington wins the World Series without Strasburg, and Strasburg leads the Nats to multiple World Series over the next five to ten years, then no. The Nats were, you know, took the better path. We have to see how this plays out. Obviously, there is anger in Washington for shutting Strasburg down. Win now is the cry. But there are also lots of case studies of guys who pitched too much too soon after surgery and never were the same as they were before the injury. Do you risk blowing up Stephen Strasburg's career because of that need to win now? Fascinating dilemma.

SIMON: Yeah. Well, you mentioned the need to win now. I mean, the way baseball franchises trade and interact and the way - the New York Yankees aren't in the playoffs every year - this could be the Nationals one chance.

GOLDMAN: It could be. But I think their general manager is banking on the fact that this guy is a phenom, he's still in his early 20s. If you tend to him properly, he's going to give you more chances in the future.

SIMON: Payton Manning in a Denver Broncos' uniform. Is that enough to put them into the Super Bowl? Well, he's got to have some people to throw the ball to; to quote, you know, Gisele Bundchen, "quarterbacks can't throw and catch at the same time." But do you see Denver winding up there?

GOLDMAN: Still strange to see him in an orange jersey, that's for sure. You know, huge spotlight on Payton Manning, and the consensus is that he's still got magic left in that right arm, and in his head; a great strategist, of course, and there's talk even that he could lead the Broncos to the Super Bowl.

SIMON: Finally, Tom, the Olympic season ends tomorrow with the close of the Paralympics Games in London. However, not a lot of us living here in the United States may know that.

GOLDMAN: Yeah, because Americans will have gotten about five and a half hours of highlight shows. No live broadcast of events by the time this thing ends. Compare that to the host country, Great Britain, which will end up showing a reported 500 hours on several platforms. Obviously, our TV networks don't think viewers would be that interested. But consider how coverage done the right way might change that interest level. And here's an excerpt from the magazine City Journal.

(Reading) The Paralympics are an invitation to watch, ask and learn. As people have asked questions, the press and the athletes have obliged with answers. How is it that a person who can't walk can control a horse? How can a person propel herself in a pool using only her legs? With knowledge and familiarity come respect and admiration. Viewers watching women's swimmers on TV in a London bar last Thursday were marveling not at a freak show but at physical prowess.

SIMON: NPR's Tom Goldman. Thanks so much.

GOLDMAN: You're welcome. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.