Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

54 minutes ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

4 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

School Districts Struggle To Get Principals To Stay Put

Sep 9, 2013
Originally published on September 11, 2013 12:06 pm

At Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts on the south side of Milwaukee, kids are back in class and getting their bearings in the sprawling building. So is Lila Hillman, the school's brand-new principal. She has to figure out where everything is, who everyone is, how to run a school — and how to answer everyone's questions.

As Hillman walks through the halls, one teacher wants to know where to hang a cutout of a tree trunk. A few steps later, a janitor asks why all the lights went out in the school the night before.

Even though the job at Parkside, a kindergarten through eighth grade school, is demanding, Hillman says it feels right to her. The mother of two was a middle-school teacher for 10 years and an assistant principal for seven.

"I wanted to wait until I really felt I was ready for it, because it is a major responsibility," she says. "And until I felt that I could take all that on, I really didn't want to do it. I think I'm ready."

Across the country, schools are increasingly churning through principals — and the problem is worse in urban districts with dwindling resources. Nearly one-fifth of Milwaukee's public schools are breaking in new principals this year.

'An Impossible Job'

Julia D'Amato retired after 10 years leading a college-prep high school in Milwaukee. "It's an impossible job," she says. Principals, she says, are often overwhelmed by the mounting responsibilities of the job and by policies that can change at the whim of superintendents or politicians.

And D'Amato says principals, especially in high-poverty schools, always have problems they can't solve. "There were kids that had health concerns that weren't being addressed because their parents had no insurance," she says. "There were people who had mental concerns that nobody was addressing. We didn't have the resources."

Beyond social challenges, Gregory Thornton, superintendent of Milwaukee Public Schools, thinks a relentless focus on testing and accountability is making the job much less attractive. He ticks off a list of responsibilities for today's principals:

"I'm looking at test scores. I gotta be certain that kids are moving in the right direction. I'm looking at formative data assessments. Are kids making growth from the first time they took the assessment to the second time they took the assessment?

"And then the ultimate for us is, I'm looking at retention," he continues. "Are parents feeling comfortable enough to bring [their children] back?"

Maintaining Stability For Students

Then there's retention of principals, which can directly affect how those kids perform. Ed Fuller, associate director of the University Council for Educational Administration, says research shows that high principal turnover causes higher teacher turnover and smaller gains in academic achievement.

"Part of the reasoning behind that finding is that you need a principal there who knows the families, who knows the community, who knows the students and has time to build a strong, positive culture focused on learning," Fuller says. "And when you have high turnover, those things just don't play out very well."

Fuller, also an associate professor with the College of Education at Penn State, says that if you can't pay principals any more — and most school systems can't — then you have to build a better working environment. In Milwaukee, Hillman is getting help with her environment via the school district, which is providing mentor principals to guide her.

"For example, [with] the budget, or who to call if there's a problem with the lawn mower kind of thing," Hillman says. Just knowing that she's not being thrown into the job with no guidance "has been very helpful," she says.

Right now, Hillman says, she's trying not to focus too much on test scores and accountability. She wants to support her teachers, hoping that high student achievement follows.

Copyright 2013 Milwaukee Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.wuwm.com/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

A new school year often means a new principal. The stress of the job means that principals often leave, especially in urban school districts. Erin Toner of member station WUWM in Milwaukee reports that high turnover rates for principals can hurt student achievement.

ERIN TONER, BYLINE: Kids are back in class this week at Milwaukee Parkside School for the Arts, the K-8 program on the city's south side. This school has a brand new principal, Lila Hillman, who's still getting her bearings in the sprawling building.

LILA HILLMAN: It seems like there's a lot of interesting ways to get to places. I mean, it's three levels. But yeah. Do you want to go upstairs?

TONER: Sure. Sure.

HILLMAN: OK.

TONER: So she has to figure out where everything is, who everyone is, how to run a school and have answers to everyone's questions. As we walk through the halls, one teacher wants to know where to hang a cutout of a tree trunk.

HILLMAN: I think you're supposed to tape it from the outside of the room.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Outside of the room?

HILLMAN: Yeah.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: OK. Is there, like...

TONER: A few steps later, a janitor asks why all the lights went out in the school the night before.

HILLMAN: There was a little issue, but we're all good. We're all good.

TONER: Hillman says even though the job is demanding, it feels right to her. The mother of two was a middle school teacher for 10 years and an assistant principal for seven.

HILLMAN: I wanted to wait until I really felt I was ready for it because it is a major responsibility. And until I felt that I could take all that on, I really didn't want to do it. But I think I'm ready.

(LAUGHTER)

TONER: Across the country, schools are increasingly churning through principals, and the problem is worse in urban districts with dwindling resources. Nearly a fifth of Milwaukee's public schools are breaking in new principals this year.

JULIA D'AMATO: It's an impossible job.

TONER: Julia D'Amato retired after 10 years leading a college prep high school in Milwaukee. She says principals are often overwhelmed by the mounting responsibilities of the job and by policies that can change at the whim of superintendents or politicians. And D'Amato says especially in high-poverty schools, principals always have problems they can't solve.

D'AMATO: There were kids that had health concerns that weren't being addressed because their parents had no insurance. There were people who had mental concerns that nobody was addressing. We didn't have the resources.

TONER: Beyond social challenges, Milwaukee Superintendent Gregory Thornton thinks the relentless focus on testing and accountability is making the job much less attractive.

GREGORY THORNTON: I'm looking at test scores. And I've got to be certain that kids are moving in the right direction. I'm looking at formative data assessments. Are kids making growth from the first time they took the assessments and the second time they took the assessments? And then the ultimate for us is I'm looking at retention. I mean, are parents feeling comfortable enough to bring them back?

TONER: Retention of principals is also key and it can directly affect how kids perform. Ed Fuller is associate director of the University Council for Educational Administration. He says research shows high principal turnover causes higher teacher turnover and smaller gains in academic achievement.

ED FULLER: Part of the reasoning behind that finding is that you need a principal there who knows the families, who knows the community, who knows the students and has time to build a strong, positive culture focused on learning. And when you have high turnover, those things just don't play out very well.

TONER: Fuller and others say if you can't pay principals any more - and most school systems can't - then you have to build a better working environment. In Milwaukee, Lila Hillman is getting help with her environment. The district is providing mentor principals to guide her.

HILLMAN: For example, a budget or who to call if there's a problem with the lawnmower kind of thing. So they kind of - really, these are the people that you're going to need. And just knowing that I'm not, here you go, good luck, I think, has been very helpful.

TONER: Hillman says right now, she's trying not to focus too much on test scores and accountability. She wants to support her teachers, hoping that high student achievement follows. For NPR News, I'm Erin Toner in Milwaukee. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.