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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to arbitration at the Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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The season for blueberries used to be short. You'd find fresh berries in the store just during a couple of months in the middle of summer.

Now, though, it's always blueberry season somewhere. Blueberry production is booming. The berries are grown in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, Michigan and the Pacific Northwest — not to mention the southern hemisphere.

But in any one location, the season is still short. And this means that workers follow the blueberry harvest, never staying in one place for long.

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Santorum's Support Builds Ahead Of Iowa Caucuses

Jan 2, 2012
Originally published on January 2, 2012 10:09 am

After concentrating on Iowa more than any other Republican presidential candidate, Rick Santorum is gaining on front-runners Mitt Romney and Ron Paul, a new Des Moines Register poll shows. Santorum is hoping to consolidate Iowa's Christian conservative vote — the strategy that won the state for former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee four years ago.

Jeanne Zyzda did not expect more than 100 people in her Sioux City coffee shop, the Daily Grind. Not all at once, and not on a holiday.

"Normally, we're not open on New Year's Day," Zyzda says. "Normally, we're not open on Sunday at all."

But Zyzda and her husband are Santorum supporters, so when they got a call from the campaign asking to hold a rally in the restaurant, they obliged. The big turnout was a change for the former Pennsylvania senator, too. He was the first to visit all 99 counties in Iowa. But sometimes he'd stop at places like this and get more suggestions than support.

"I do remember several people coming up to me and giving me pointers on how I could improve my presentation," Santorum chuckles. "Absolutely true, and I gotta tell you, I appreciated that."

Santorum is fond of saying he's a much better candidate thanks to the people of Iowa. Now, he's the candidate with momentum. But his core message is the same.

"Having that strong foundation of the faith and family allows America to be in a position where we can be more free," Santorum says. "We can be free because we are good decent moral people."

For Santorum that means cutting government regulation. Making Americans less dependent on government aid. Fewer people getting food stamps, Medicaid and other forms of federal assistance — especially one group.

"I don't want to make black people's lives better by giving them somebody else's money," Santorum begins. "I want to give them the opportunity to go out and earn the money and provide for themselves and their families."

Santorum did not elaborate on why he singled out blacks who rely on federal assistance. The voters here didn't seem to care.

Shelle Baldwin and her husband own a cattle feed lot near Sioux City. She is a longtime Santorum supporter, and she's thrilled he's finally getting the attention she thinks he deserves.

"We always were really hopeful that the country would see that we needed somebody like him, and that really there were people in this country that shared the same beliefs and values that he did," Baldwin says.

Others — like Elizabeth Lee and Lee Ehrhardt — still haven't decided which Christian conservative candidate to vote for.

"I'm leaning toward Santorum going into the caucus Tuesday," Lee says. "We're still kind of leaning toward Bachmann and there's also, is it Perry?"

"I like him, too — those three are about tied," Ehrhardt says.

For Santorum to win the Iowa caucuses or come close, he needs those potential Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry votes. He left Sioux City on Sunday hopeful he will get them.

"Please help us out," Santorum asked. "You will send a shock wave across this country."

Even a third-place finish for Santorum Tuesday would prove his long commitment to Iowa paid off.

Copyright 2012 National Public Radio. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION, from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

The winner of the Iowa caucuses does not always win his party's nomination. But a win, or even a strong showing, does bring attention, momentum and campaign money. And that's exactly what Rick Santorum is counting on for tomorrow.

The former Pennsylvania senator has spent many, many days in Iowa. Polls show him gaining on front-runners Mitt Romney and Ron Paul. Until recently, Santorum looked like a long-shot candidate, but he is relying on Christian conservatives, some of the same people who propelled Mike Huckabee to a win in 2008.

Here's NPR's Ted Robbins.

JEANNE ZYZDA: Thank you. Thanks for your help.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #1: Keep applying. Thank you. God bless.

TED ROBBINS, BYLINE: Jeanne Zyzda did not expect more than a hundred people in her Sioux City coffee shop, the Daily Grind - not all at once, and not on a holiday.

ZYZDA: Normally, we're not open on New Year's Day. Normally, we're not open on Sundays at all, but they...

ROBBINS: But Zyzda and her husband are Rick Santorum supporters. So when they got a call from the campaign asking them to hold a rally in the restaurant, they obliged. The big turnout was a change for the former Pennsylvania senator, too. He was the first to visit all 99 counties in Iowa. But sometimes, he'd stop at places like this and get more suggestions than support.

RICK SANTORUM: I do remember several people coming up to me, and giving me pointers on how I can improve my presentation.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

SANTORUM: And - no, I'm being - absolutely true. And I got to tell you, I appreciated that.

ROBBINS: Rick Santorum is fond of saying he's a much better candidate, thanks to the people of Iowa. Now, he's the candidate with momentum. But his core message? It's the same.

SANTORUM: Having that strong foundation of the faith and family allows America to be in a position where we can be more free. We can be free because we are good, decent, moral people.

ROBBINS: For Santorum, that means cutting government regulation, making Americans less dependent on government aid, fewer people getting food stamps, Medicaid and other forms of aid - especially one group.

SANTORUM: I don't want to make black people's lives better by giving them somebody else's money. I want to give them the opportunity to go out and earn the money.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN #2: Right.

SANTORUM: And provide for themselves and their families.

(SOUNDBITE OF APPLAUSE)

SANTORUM: And the best way to do that...

ROBBINS: Santorum did not elaborate on why he singled out blacks who rely on federal assistance. The voters here didn't seem to care.

Shelle Baldwin and her husband own a cattle-feed lot near Sioux City. She's a longtime Santorum supporter, and she is just thrilled that he's finally getting the attention she thinks he deserves.

SHELLE BALDWIN: We always were really hopeful that the country would see that we needed somebody like him and that really, there were people in this country that share the same beliefs and the values that he did.

ROBBINS: Others - like Elizabeth Lee and Lee Ehrhardt - still haven't decided which Christian conservative candidate to vote for.

ELIZABETH LEE: I'm leaning towards Santorum going into the caucus Tuesday but...

ROBBINS: Well, who else would it be for you?

LEE: We're still kind of leaning towards Bachmann, and then there's also - is it Perry?

LEE EHRHARDT: I like him, too.

LEE: There's three, yeah.

EHRHARDT: Those three are about tied.

ROBBINS: For Rick Santorum to win the Iowan caucuses, or come close, he needs those potential Michele Bachmann and Rick Perry votes. He left Sioux City yesterday hopeful he'll get them.

SANTORUM: Please help us out. You will send a shockwave across this country.

ROBBINS: Even a third-place finish for Santorum tomorrow would prove his long commitment to Iowa paid off.

Ted Robbins, NPR News, Sioux City, Iowa. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright National Public Radio.