Police in Baton Rouge say they have arrested three people who stole guns with the goal of killing police officers. They are still looking for a fourth suspect in the alleged plot, NPR's Greg Allen reports.

"Police say the thefts were at a Baton Rouge pawn shop early Saturday morning," Greg says. "One person was arrested at the scene. Since then, two others have been arrested and six of the eight stolen handguns have been recovered. Police are still looking for one other man."

A 13-year-old boy is among those arrested, Greg says.

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After an international tribunal invalidated Beijing's claims to the South China Sea, Chinese authorities have declared in no uncertain terms that they will be ignoring the ruling.

The Philippines brought the case to the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague, objecting to China's claims to maritime rights in the disputed waters. The tribunal agreed that China had no legal authority to claim the waters, and was infringing on the sovereign rights of the Philippines.

Donald Trump is firing back at Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg after she made disparaging comments about him in several media interviews. He tweeted late Tuesday that she "has embarrassed all" with her "very dumb" comments about the candidate. Trump ended his tweet with "Her mind is shot - resign!":

Donald Trump wrapped up his public tryout of potential vice presidential candidates in Indiana Tuesday night with Gov. Mike Pence giving the final audition.

The Indiana governor's stock as Trump's possible running mate is believed to be on the rise, with New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich also atop the list. Sources tell NPR the presumptive GOP presidential nominee is close to making a decision, which he's widely expected to announce by Friday.

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The unassuming hero of Jonas Karlsson's clever, Kafkaesque parable is the opposite of a malcontent. Despite scant education, a limited social life, and no prospects for success as it is usually defined, he's that rarity, a most happy fella with an amazing ability to content himself with very little. But one day, returning to his barebones flat from his dead-end, part-time job at a video store, he finds an astronomical bill from an entity called W.R.D. He assumes it's a scam. Actually, it is more sinister-- and it forces him to take a good hard look at his life and values.

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Donald Trump picked a military town — Virginia Beach, Va. — to give a speech Monday on how he would go about overhauling the Department of Veterans Affairs if elected.

He blamed the Obama administration for a string of scandals at the VA during the past two years, and claimed that his rival, Hillary Clinton, has downplayed the problems and won't fix them.

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Return Of Gray Wolves Renews Debate Over Hunting

Feb 10, 2012
Originally published on February 10, 2012 6:24 pm

Gray wolves were taken off the endangered species list in Idaho and Montana last year and put under state control. But they're still on the list in neighboring Wyoming. That's because Wyoming has been the most aggressive about wanting to kill wolves.

Wyoming has finally struck a deal with the federal government regarding how wolves will be treated once the state takes over. But environmentalists believe the agreement denies wolves an important refuge.

There weren't any wolves in Wyoming until the federal government reintroduced them in the 1990s. Now there are at least 329 in the state. But the state is eager to shrink the population because wolves kill livestock and game.

"My personal opinion is they need to be hunted wherever and whenever they occur, because wolves are extremely secretive creatures; they're extremely intelligent," says Joe Tilden, a county commissioner in Wyoming and the founder of a hunting advocacy group.

Under the new deal, wolves in the northwestern part of Wyoming could be managed as trophy animals unless they're in Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks.

But conservationists worry hunting will be allowed on a stretch of national parkland that connects Yellowstone to Grand Teton. It's called the John D. Rockefeller Parkway.

"Wolves use that area extensively traveling through the two parks, and it's a very wild area," says Sharon Mader, who represents the National Parks Conservation Association. She says this corridor is essential for maintaining viable populations. "Unique and iconic wildlife, such as wolves, that are just coming off the endangered species list deserve the ultimate protection that national parks offer."

She says it's especially important for the parks to provide this sanctuary for wolves in Wyoming because they will be hunted on other federal lands there. If they wander out of the state's northwest corner, they will be considered predators and could be shot on sight.

The National Park Service is against hunting wolves on the Rockefeller Parkway, too.

"Visitors come to Yellowstone, they come to Tetons, they come to the parkway just to see wolves, so we want to manage the park so that people can enjoy wildlife viewing," says Herbert Frost, an associate director of the Park Service. He says his agency has the authority to ban wolf hunts on parkland, but he's not picking that fight with the state ... yet.

"We haven't ceded anything. We're just working with the state so that we can work together, as opposed to working at odds with each other," he says.

Most national parks forbid hunting, but the legislation creating the Rockefeller Parkway allows for some hunting. Scott Talbott, who heads the Wyoming Game & Fish Department, says his agency manages hunts of other animals in the parkway, and it wants to keep its options open to hold wolf hunts there, too.

"As we move forward, it may be fairly important for the department to move forward with wolf hunting in the JDR [Parkway]," Talbott says.

For instance, if the population gets out of hand, hunters like Tilden may be needed.

"When you're hunting a predator, you're not only out to enjoy the sport, but you're out to control the number of predators," he says.

The wolf in Wyoming is expected to come off the endangered species list by early autumn. Conservationists hope there's a hunting ban in the Rockefeller Parkway by then.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel. Gray wolves have been taken off the endangered species list in several western states. That means their populations have recovered. But complications continue in Wyoming. Wolves there are still federally protected because the state has been aggressive about wanting to kill them. Now, Wyoming has finally struck a deal with the federal government for how wolves will be treated once they come off list. As NPR's Elizabeth Shogren reports, environmentalists say the deal agreement does not go far enough.

ELIZABETH SHOGREN, BYLINE: There weren't any wolves in Wyoming until the federal government reintroduced them in the 1990s. Now, there are at least 329. The state is eager to shrink the population because wolves kill livestock and game. Joe Tilden is a county commissioner in Wyoming and the founder of a hunting advocacy group.

JOE TILDEN: My personal opinion is that they need to be hunted wherever and whenever they occur because wolves are extremely secretive-type creatures. They're extremely intelligent.

SHOGREN: Under the new deal, wolves in the northwestern part of Wyoming could be managed as trophy animals, unless they're in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks. But conservationists worry hunting will be allowed on a stretch of national park that connects Yellowstone to Grand Teton. It's called the J.D. Rockefeller Parkway.

SHARON MADER: Wolves use that area extensively traveling between the two parks, and it's a very wild area.

SHOGREN: Sharon Mader represents the National Parks Conservation Association. She says this corridor is essential for maintaining viable populations.

MADER: Unique and iconic wildlife such as wolves that are just coming off the endangered species list deserve the ultimate protection that national parks offer.

SHOGREN: She says it's especially important for the parks to provide this sanctuary for wolves in Wyoming because they will be hunted on other federal lands there. If they wander out of the state's northwest corner, they will be considered predators and could be shot on sight. The National Park Service is against hunting wolves on the J.D. Rockefeller Parkway too.

HERBERT FROST: Visitors come to Yellowstone, they come to Tetons, they come to the parkway to see wolves, and so we want to manage the park so that people can enjoy wildlife viewing.

SHOGREN: Herbert Frost is an associate director of the Park Service. He says his agency has the authority to ban wolf hunts on park land, but he's not picking that fight with the state yet.

FROST: We haven't ceded anything. We're just working with the state so that we can work together as opposed to working at odds with each other.

SHOGREN: Most national parks forbid hunting. But the legislation creating the J.D. Rockefeller Parkway allows for some hunting. Scott Talbot heads the Wyoming Department of Game and Fish. His agency manages hunts of other animals on the J.D. Rockefeller Parkway, and Talbot wants to keep his options open to hold wolf hunts there too.

SCOTT TALBOTT: As we move forward, it may be fairly important for the department to move forward with wolf hunting in the JDR.

SHOGREN: For instance, if the population gets out of hand, hunters like Joe Tilden may be needed.

TILDEN: When you're hunting a predator, you're not only out to enjoy the sport, but you're also out to control a number of predators.

SHOGREN: The wolf in Wyoming is expected to come off the endangered species list by early autumn. Conservationists hope there's a hunting ban in the J.D. Rockefeller Parkway by then. Elizabeth Shogren, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.