Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

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Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

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Editor's note: This report contains accounts of rape, violence and other disturbing events.

Sex trafficking wasn't a major concern in the early 1980s, when Beth Jacobs was a teenager. If you were a prostitute, the thinking went, it was your choice.

Jacobs thought that too, right up until she came to, on the lot of a dark truck stop one night. She says she had asked a friendly-seeming man for a ride home that afternoon.

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Retired Gen. David Petraeus Heads To Wall Street

May 30, 2013
Originally published on May 30, 2013 6:32 pm

Retired Gen. David Petraeus is headed to Wall Street where he will join Kohlberg Kravis Roberts, a firm that invests globally in everything from real estate to coffee to biotech.

Over nearly four decades in the military, Petraeus traveled the world on diplomatic and intelligence missions. Even then, he says in a video posted Thursday on KKR's website, he occasionally viewed these trips through an investor's lens.

"[I] would occasionally wonder: Why aren't there U.S. investors here?" he says.

Petraeus is a West Point graduate with a doctoral degree in international relations from Princeton. Before joining the CIA, he was commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan, which culminated more than 37 years in the Army.

He says he decided to join KKR because the company takes what he calls an "intellectual" approach to business. The company invests in many different industry sectors and in more than 80 companies ranging from U.S. medical-device makers to dairy farms in China and a coffee chain in India.

"I think there are enormous trends that are developing around the world in energy, manufacturing, life sciences and IT revolutions that are having far-reaching effects, and we're just beginning to see what those effects will be long term," Petraeus says in the video.

Petraeus will head the newly created KKR Global Institute, a kind of advisory arm for clients. The company says he will also advise KKR itself on international investments, an area where Petraeus has impressive contacts. Speaking in the video, KKR co-founder Henry Kravis tells Petraeus: "By bringing you on to chair the global institute, what it will give us is a real advantage from an investor standpoint."

In joining a big name Wall Street firm, Petraeus is following a well-worn path tread by many former top government officials.

Petraeus resigned last November as CIA director after an investigation unrelated to him revealed an extramarital affair he had with his biographer. In the months following the disclosure of his affair and his resignation, he had kept out of the public eye, working on helping veterans find employment. Finally, in late March, he broke his silence. Speaking to an audience of veterans at the University of Southern California, he acknowledged he's still working to rebuild the public's faith in him.

"I join you keenly aware that I am regarded in a different light than I was a year ago," he said at the time, apologizing for causing pain to his family and supporters.

Petraeus is perhaps best known for championing a counterinsurgency strategy in Iraq that involved winning "hearts and minds." When he retired from the military three years ago, he had this advice: "We don't always get to fight the wars for which we're most prepared, or most inclined." In other words, the best-laid plans sometimes lead to unexpected places, so one must adapt.

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