Presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton was in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday where she sought to use the symbolism of a historic landmark to draw parallels to a present-day America that is in need of repairing deepening racial and cultural divides.

The Old State Capitol — where Abraham Lincoln delivered his famous "A house divided" speech in 1858 warning against the ills of slavery and where Barack Obama launched his presidential bid in 2007 — served as the backdrop for Clinton as she spoke of how "America's long struggle with race is far from finished."

Episode 711: Hooked on Heroin

1 hour ago

When we meet the heroin dealer called Bone, he has just shot up. He has a lot to say anyway. He tells us about his career--it pretty much tracks the evolution of drug use in America these past ten years or so. He tells us about his rough past. And he tells us about how he died a week ago. He overdosed on his own supply and his friend took his body to the emergency room, then left.

New British Prime Minister Theresa May announced six members of her Cabinet Wednesday.

Amid a sweeping crackdown on dissent in Egypt, security forces have forcibly disappeared hundreds of people since the beginning of 2015, according to a new report from Amnesty International.

It's an "unprecedented spike," the group says, with an average of three or four people disappeared every day.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Many public figures who took to Twitter and Facebook following the murder of five police officers in Dallas have faced public blowback and, in some cases, found their employers less than forgiving about inflammatory and sometimes hateful online comments.

As Venezuela unravels — with shortages of food and medicine, as well as runaway inflation — President Nicolas Maduro is increasingly unpopular. But he's still holding onto power.

"The truth in Venezuela is there is real hunger. We are hungry," says a man who has invited me into his house in the northwestern city of Maracaibo, but doesn't want his name used for fear of reprisals by the government.

The wiry man paces angrily as he speaks. It wasn't always this way, he says, showing how loose his pants are now.

Ask a typical teenage girl about the latest slang and girl crushes and you might get answers like "spilling the tea" and Taylor Swift. But at the Girl Up Leadership Summit in Washington, D.C., the answers were "intersectional feminism" — the idea that there's no one-size-fits-all definition of feminism — and U.N. climate chief Christiana Figueres.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Arizona Hispanics Poised To Swing State Blue

4 hours ago
Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Pages

Remote Antarctic Trek Reveals A Glacier Melting From Below

Sep 15, 2013
Originally published on September 18, 2013 8:50 am

Scientists watching Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier from space have noticed with some alarm that it has been surging toward the sea.

If it were to melt entirely, global sea levels would rise by several feet.

The glacier is really, really remote. It's 1,800 miles from McMurdo, the U.S. base station in Antarctica, so just getting there is a challenge. Scientists have rarely been able to get out to the glacier to make direct measurements.

"This was a granddaddy of a problem," says Tim Stanton, oceanography research professor at the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, Calif.

Stanton not only wanted to get to it, he wanted to get to it with 20,000 pounds of gear, so they could drill into it.

Stanton and about a dozen colleagues spent several years planning this mission, which involved multiple aircraft and remote support camps. In fact, they took four trips to Antarctica before they finally succeeded.

It wasn't just getting there that was hard. Bill Shaw, a colleague of Stanton's, says Antarctica has its own way of serving up trouble.

"You're in your tent sleeping, and you start to hear things flapping and then you wake up to find that all your neatly piled batches of gear are now covered in several feet of snow," Shaw says. "You're going to spend the next several days digging it out and getting going again."

That happened more than once during their seven weeks out on this remote piece of ice. They chose this spot because the glacier here is actually being undercut by ocean water, which flows below it.

The team's challenge was to drill down through the ice sheet, which is twice as thick as the Golden Gate Bridge is tall. Melting those holes involved heating up a metal rod and circulating hot fluid through hoses to the rod, as it gradually ate its way down through the ice.

"Everybody was shlepping hose," Stanton says. "They needed lots of support, so that's what we did during the drilling phase. As soon as the hole was through, we immediately started deploying instruments."

In particular, Stanton wanted to measure the currents flowing right under the ice sheet. He wanted to test how salty the water was, and to find out how quickly the ice was being eaten away by the comparatively warm seawater. They also grabbed a sample of the mud from the seafloor below.

"To see what's down there is quite remarkable, because I can assure you, nobody else on this planet's ever touched the mud before us, underneath an ice shelf like that," he says.

Their instruments showed that meltwater from the glacier was flowing rapidly toward the open ocean, and cutting into the ice above as it went.

"I was surprised by how much like a river this was. It's a river, but instead of eroding a channel, it's melting a channel," Shaw says.

And it turns out that channel is melting very fast. As they report in Science magazine, the ice in that channel was disappearing at the rate of 2 inches a day. Stanton said their measurement is consistent with what scientists had inferred from satellite measurements.

"Don't forget, this happens day in and day out," he says. "We saw no changes over the 35 days that we were reporting on in this paper. It's a phenomenally high melt rate compared to what we observe in the Arctic, for example."

At the moment, it's contributing a tiny amount to rising sea levels. But the melting has been accelerating in recent years, and if it keeps accelerating, in the very long run, the Pine Island Glacier could add several feet to global sea levels.

The results are sobering, but Stanton says when the drilling system finally punched through the ice and he was able to position his instruments, he felt he'd conquered this grandaddy of a problem.

"That was remarkably satisfying," he says. "It really had been a long, long road."

With luck, those instruments will continue to run for another two or three years — and send their data back via satellite to Stanton and his colleagues, in the cozy confines of their labs.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Something alarming has been happening on Antarctica's Pine Island Glacier. It's been surging toward the sea. If the glacier melted entirely, that would raise global sea level by several feet. Scientists have watched the glacier from space but have rarely been able to get out to this very remote glacier. Now some scientists are setting out on a mission to drill through that glacier.

NPR's Richard Harris reports.

RICHARD HARRIS, BYLINE: Pine Island Glacier is really, really remote. It's 1800 miles from McMurdo, the U.S. base-station in Antarctica. So just getting there is a challenge. Tim Stanton, from the Naval Postgraduate School in Monterey, not only wanted to get to it but he wanted to get to it with 20,000 pounds of gear, so they could drill into it.

TIM STANTON: This was a granddaddy of a problem.

HARRIS: Stanton and about a dozen colleagues spent several years planning this mission, which involved multiple aircraft and remote support camps. In fact, they took four trips to Antarctica before they finally succeeded. And it wasn't just getting there that was hard. Bill Shaw, a colleague of Stanton's, says Antarctica has its own way of serving up trouble.

BILL SHAW: You're in your tent sleeping and you start to hear things flapping. And then you wake up and you find that all your neatly piled batches of gear are now covered in several feet of snow, and you're going to spend the next several days digging it all out and getting going again.

HARRIS: That happened more than once during their seven weeks out on this remote piece of ice. They chose this spot because the glacier here is actually being undercut by ocean water, which flows below it. The team's challenge was to drill through the ice sheet, which here was twice as thick as the Golden Gate Bridge is tall. Melting those holes involved heating up a metal rod and circulating hot fluid through hoses to the rod, as it gradually ate its way down through the ice.

STANTON: Everybody was schlepping hose. You know, they needed a lot of support, so that's what we did during the drilling phase. And as soon as the hole was through, we immediately started deploying instruments.

HARRIS: In particular, Stanton wanted to measure the currents flowing right under the ice sheet. He wanted to test how salty the water was. And he wanted to find out how quickly the ice was being eaten away by the comparatively warm seawater. They also grabbed a sample of the mud from the seafloor below.

STANTON: To sort of see what's down there is quite remarkable, 'cause I can assure you nobody else on this planet has ever touched the mud before us underneath an ice shelf like that.

HARRIS: Their instruments showed that melt water from the glacier was flowing rapidly toward the open ocean, and cutting into the ice above as it went.

Again, Bill Shaw.

SHAW: I was surprised by how much like a river this was. It's a river. But instead of eroding a channel, it's melting a channel.

HARRIS: And it turns out that channel is melting very fast. As they report in Science magazine, ice in that channel was disappearing at the rate of two inches a day. Stanton said their measurement is consistent with what scientists had inferred from satellite measurements.

STANTON: And don't forget, this happens day in and day out. We saw no changes over the 35 days that we were reporting on in this paper. And it's a phenomenally high melt rate compared to what we observe in the Arctic, for example.

HARRIS: At the moment, it's contributing a tiny amount to rising sea levels. But the melting has been accelerating in recent years. And if it keeps accelerating, in the very long run, the Pine Island Glacier could add several feet to global sea level. These are sobering results. But Stanton says when the drilling team finally punched through the ice and he was able to position his instruments, he felt he'd conquered this granddaddy of a problem.

STANTON: That was remarkably satisfying and it really had been a long, long road.

HARRIS: With luck, those instruments will continue to run for another two or three years, and send their data back via satellite to Stanton and his colleagues, in the cozy confines of their labs.

Richard Harris, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.