The Boston Citgo sign, all 3,600 square LED feet of which has served as the backdrop to Red Sox games since 1965, is now officially a "pending landmark."

Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí spent much of the 1940s in the U.S., avoiding World War II and its aftermath. He was a well-known fixture on the art scene in Monterey, Calif. — and that's where the largest collection of Dalí's work on the West Coast is now open to the public.

Copyright 2016 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.

The middle of summer is when the surprises in publishing turn up. I'm talking about those quietly commanding books that publishers tend to put out now, because fall and winter are focused on big books by established authors. Which brings us to The Dream Life of Astronauts, by Patrick Ryan, a very funny and touching collection of nine short stories that take place in the 1960s and '70s around Cape Canaveral, Fla.

When the United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union last month, the seaside town of Port Talbot in Wales eagerly went along with the move. Brexit was approved by some 57 percent of the town's residents.

Now some of them are wondering if they made the wrong decision.

The June 23 Brexit vote has raised questions about the fate of the troubled Port Talbot Works, Britain's largest surviving steel plant — a huge, steam-belching facility that has long been the town's biggest employer.

Solar Impulse 2 has landed in Cairo, completing the penultimate leg of its attempt to circumnavigate the globe using only the power of the sun.

The trip over the Mediterranean included a breathtaking flyover of the Pyramids. Check it out:

President Obama is challenging Americans to have an honest and open-hearted conversation about race and law enforcement. But even as he sits down at the White House with police and civil rights activists, Obama is mindful of the limits of that approach.

"I've seen how inadequate words can be in bringing about lasting change," the president said Tuesday at a memorial service for five law officers killed last week in Dallas. "I've seen how inadequate my own words have been."

Mice watching Orson Welles movies may help scientists explain human consciousness.

At least that's one premise of the Allen Brain Observatory, which launched Wednesday and lets anyone with an Internet connection study a mouse brain as it responds to visual information.

The FBI says it is giving up on the D.B. Cooper investigation, 45 years after the mysterious hijacker parachuted into the night with $200,000 in a briefcase, becoming an instant folk figure.

"Following one of the longest and most exhaustive investigations in our history," the FBI's Ayn Dietrich-Williams said in a statement, "the FBI redirected resources allocated to the D.B. Cooper case in order to focus on other investigative priorities."

This is the first in a series of essays concerning our collective future. The goal is to bring forth some of the main issues humanity faces today, as we move forward to uncertain times. In an effort to be as thorough as possible, we will consider two kinds of threats: those due to natural disasters and those that are man-made. The idea is to expose some of the dangers and possible mechanisms that have been proposed to deal with these issues. My intention is not to offer a detailed analysis for each threat — but to invite reflection and, hopefully, action.

Pages

Penn State Officials Take Booze Out Of 'State Patty's Day' Mix

Feb 22, 2013
Originally published on February 22, 2013 6:47 pm

St. Patrick's Day is more than three weeks away, but this weekend near Pennsylvania State University in State College, a similar celebration — called "State Patty's Day" — is happening.

While it has some of the trappings of the Irish holiday, for most it's just an excuse to get drunk and party.

This year, university and local officials hope to discourage participation in State Patty's Day: They're paying downtown stores and bars not to sell booze.

State Patty's Day started in 2007 when the official holiday landed during Penn State's spring break. Students organized an alternative that has grown into an annual tradition.

State College Police Chief Tom King says the unofficial celebration attracts college students from all over the region — and that has become a problem.

"It's our busiest 36 hours of the year," says King. "It's busy with the fights, physical assaults, sexual assaults, drunk driving, vandalism, people throwing up and urinating in people's yards."

So Damon Sims, vice president for student affairs at Penn State, came up with a solution. Working through a formal anti-drinking partnership with the town of State College, they approached local bars.

"We asked if they might agree to an arrangement which would allow for an alcohol-free experience on State Patty's Day," says Sims. More than three dozen downtown businesses said yes.

In exchange, Sims says they'll get a check from the town and the university.

"The Partnership Against Dangerous Drinking is making $5,000 payments to each of those establishments," says Sims.

That's about $190,000 in payments. The bulk of the money comes from parking revenue earned from previous State Patty's Days. But $5,000 doesn't cover the profits some bars would earn. Backers argue this is about more than profit.

"What I was excited about was everybody was able to put their individual needs and views aside to benefit State College and Penn State," says Jennifer Zangrilli, the director of operations at Dante's Restaurants and president of the Tavern Association of State College.

Not everyone was happy about signing on, though.

"None of us in our company agree with the policy," says Tom Baron, president of Big Burrito Restaurant Group, which owns a Mad Mex restaurant and bar in downtown State College.

As more businesses signed on, Baron says he felt pressure to do the same.

"We knew that we'd make enemies with the township and with the university, and we didn't want to be that way," he says.

Baron says his employees are trained to handle rowdy guests, and he worries that partyers will take their State Patty's Day celebrations somewhere less safe. Local police say they're ready for that and will have extra patrols at apartment complexes and other places where parties may relocate. And, as always, they'll be on the lookout for underage drinkers.

"It just seems like they're really trying to control us too much," says Penn State freshman Kevin Fischer. "I'm still going to go out."

It's not just current students upset by plans to rein in State Patty's Day. Justin Eleazer, a 2006 Penn State graduate, lives in State College and says this is more about the university's image than safety. "And since [university officials] gave themselves several black eyes in the last year, they're trying to clean up this," says Eleazer.

Still reeling from the Jerry Sandusky scandal, Penn State has launched a campaign to burnish its image. But school officials say they were concerned about State Patty's Day well before the Sandusky issue came along.

The big question now is whether paying bars and stores not to sell alcohol on State Patty's Day will work. If it does, in future years the university and borough hope to turn State Patty's Day into an official celebration — one that is about more than just getting drunk.

Copyright 2013 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

St. Patrick's Day is three weeks away but tomorrow, near the campus of Penn State, there's a similar celebration. It's called State Patty's Day. For many students, it's just an excuse to get drunk and party. Well, this year, the university and town officials are trying to discourage participation, so they're paying stores and bars not to sell alcohol. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

JEFF BRADY BYLINE: State Patty's Day started in 2007 when the official holiday landed during Penn State's spring break. Students organized an alternative that has grown into an annual tradition. There's even a State Patty's Day rap.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG)

RAPPER: Saturday night, I'm totally wasted, my friends from out of town are being arrested, trouble bustin' in from out of state and I can't even get me a Shamrock Shake.

BYLINE: State College Police Chief Tom King says State Patty's Day attracts college students from all over the region and that has become a problem.

TOM KING: It's our busiest 36 hours of the year, busier than football games, busier than the arts festival, busier than any other time. And it's busy with the fights, physical assaults, sexual assaults, drunk driving, vandalism, people throwing up and urinating in people's yards.

BYLINE: The vice president for student affairs at Penn State, Damon Sims, came up with a solution. Working through a formal anti-drinking partnership with the town of State College they approached local bars.

DAMON SIMS: We asked if they might agree to an arrangement which would allow for an alcohol-free experience on State Patty's Day or at least a 24-hour period that includes State Patty's Day.

JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: More than three dozen downtown businesses said yes. In exchange, Sims says they'll get a check from the town and the university.

SIMS: The Partnership Against Dangerous Drinking is making $5,000 payments to each of those establishments.

BRADY: That's about $190,000 in payments. The bulk of the money comes from parking revenue earned from previous State Patty's Days. $5,000 doesn't cover the profits some bars would earn, though. Jennifer Zangrilli heads the Tavern Association of State College. She says this is about more than profit.

JENNIFER ZANGRILLI: What I was excited about was everybody was able to put their kind of individual needs and views aside to benefit State College and Penn State. Not for the short term, but I think for the long term.

BRADY: Not everyone was happy about signing on, though.

TOM BARON: I will say that none of us in our company agree with the policy.

BRADY: Tom Baron is president of a chain that includes the Mad Mex restaurant and bar in downtown State College. As more businesses signed on, he felt pressure to do the same.

BARON: We knew that we'd make enemies with the township and with the university, and we didn't want to be that way. As a matter of fact, just talking to you and probably being on the air will cause conflict.

BRADY: Baron says his employees are trained to handle rowdy guests and he worries partyers will take their State Patty's Day celebrations somewhere less safe. Local police say they're ready for that and will have extra patrols at apartment complexes and other places where parties may move to. And, as always, they'll be on the lookout for underage drinkers.

KEVIN FISCHER: It just seems like they're really trying to control us too much.

BRADY: Kevin Fischer is a freshman at Penn State.

FISCHER: My plans I had, they don't get cancelled. I'm still going to go out. Obviously, I'm going to limit myself more. There's no chance of me getting not good enough to be able to walk home from downtown 'cause you don't want to risk getting caught by cops.

BRADY: It's not just current students upset by plans to rein in State Patty's Day. Justin Eleazer is a Penn State alumnus who lives in State College.

JUSTIN ELEAZER: The university doesn't like the image that it gives. And since they gave themselves several black eyes in the last year, they're trying to clean up this.

BRADY: Still reeling from the Jerry Sandusky scandal, Penn State has launched a campaign to burnish its image. But school and town officials say they were concerned about State Patty's Day well before the Sandusky issue came along. In future years, they hope to turn State Patty's Day into an official celebration, one that is about more than just getting drunk. Jeff Brady, NPR News. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.